Seat pole

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Brendo, Jan 27, 2007.

  1. Brendo

    Brendo Guest

    I recently got 'fitted' for my bike, and in the process, aquired
    a new seat post. It is chromed, and there seems to be a small
    amount of 'milling' around the circumference of the post.
    However, over the last two or three rides, the post slips down
    inside the tube. It's not a great dea;, 10-15mm, but it's noticeable.

    Is this due to
    a) the chromed finish
    b) a film of grease between the post and the clamp
    c) me being 110kg
    0r d) all of the above.

    Any suggestions on how to make it non-slip?
     
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  2. neon

    neon New Member

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    Clean the grease of the post, try using chalk. It work for me on the MTB.
     
  3. Dave

    Dave Guest

    On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 11:32:45 +0900, Brendo wrote:

    > Is this due to
    > a) the chromed finish
    > b) a film of grease between the post and the clamp
    > c) me being 110kg
    > 0r d) all of the above.
    >
    > Any suggestions on how to make it non-slip?


    You want a *very* thin film of grease so that the seatpost doesn't become
    permanently attached. I know it sounds obvious, but have you tried
    tightening the clamp just a touch? Otherwise it's possible that the
    seatpost is slightly undersized. If there's too much grease try wiping it
    off around where it should be clamped, leaving a super thin smear.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    Careful. We don't want to learn from this. -- Calvin
     
  4. Brendo

    Brendo Guest

    Dave wrote:
    > On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 11:32:45 +0900, Brendo wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Is this due to
    >> a) the chromed finish
    >> b) a film of grease between the post and the clamp
    >> c) me being 110kg
    >>0r d) all of the above.
    >>
    >>Any suggestions on how to make it non-slip?

    >
    >
    > You want a *very* thin film of grease so that the seatpost doesn't become
    > permanently attached. I know it sounds obvious, but have you tried
    > tightening the clamp just a touch? Otherwise it's possible that the
    > seatpost is slightly undersized. If there's too much grease try wiping it
    > off around where it should be clamped, leaving a super thin smear.
    >

    That's essentially what I have done. I cleaned the grease off the
    post, cleaned around the inside of the seat tube to around 1inch
    from the top, then replaced the post, and tightened. Fingers
    crossed that i will have fixed it. We shall see...
     
  5. Joel Mayes

    Joel Mayes Guest

    On 2007-01-28, Brendo <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Dave wrote:


    >>>Any suggestions on how to make it non-slip?

    >>
    >>
    >> You want a *very* thin film of grease so that the seatpost doesn't become


    <SNIP>

    > That's essentially what I have done. I cleaned the grease off the
    > post, cleaned around the inside of the seat tube to around 1inch
    > from the top, then replaced the post, and tightened. Fingers
    > crossed that i will have fixed it. We shall see...



    If that doesn't work try a shim made out of an old aluminium can.

    Cheers

    Joel
     
  6. Resound

    Resound Guest

    "Joel Mayes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2007-01-28, Brendo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Dave wrote:

    >
    >>>>Any suggestions on how to make it non-slip?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> You want a *very* thin film of grease so that the seatpost doesn't
    >>> become

    >
    > <SNIP>
    >
    >> That's essentially what I have done. I cleaned the grease off the
    >> post, cleaned around the inside of the seat tube to around 1inch
    >> from the top, then replaced the post, and tightened. Fingers
    >> crossed that i will have fixed it. We shall see...

    >
    >
    > If that doesn't work try a shim made out of an old aluminium can.
    >


    The only thing to be wary of with that is when you have a steel frame and
    steel seatpost. Putting a thin layer of aluminium between the two sets you
    up for all manner of dissimilar metals corrosion that would not otherwise
    have been an issue. I'm prepared to be corrected by anyone with a background
    in metallurgy or course.
     
  7. SomeGuy

    SomeGuy New Member

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    How many people use steel seatposts though?
     
  8. Joel Mayes

    Joel Mayes Guest

    On 2007-01-28, Resound <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > "Joel Mayes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>
    >> If that doesn't work try a shim made out of an old aluminium can.
    >>

    >
    > The only thing to be wary of with that is when you have a steel frame and
    > steel seatpost. Putting a thin layer of aluminium between the two sets you
    > up for all manner of dissimilar metals corrosion that would not otherwise
    > have been an issue. I'm prepared to be corrected by anyone with a background
    > in metallurgy or course.


    I've never seen this happen, whether this is 'cause of grease use or the
    thin layer of plastic which is on the inside of alu cans I can't say.

    Cheers

    Joel
     
  9. mikeg

    mikeg New Member

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    I had touble with seat post slipping (similar weight), until I replaced the quick release seat post clamp with a fixed (non-quick release) seat post clamp

    Mike
     
  10. Brendo

    Brendo Guest

    mikeg wrote:
    > I had touble with seat post slipping (similar weight), until I replaced
    > the quick release seat post clamp with a fixed (non-quick release) seat
    > post clamp
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >

    My post clamp is a fixed one. I'm tightening it as much as I can
    (I'm a little worried about stripping it if I go much tighter!!).

    Maybe the solution is another seat post, one that grips better!!
     
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