seatpost rack & bag combo query

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Dilbert Firestorm, May 26, 2004.

  1. anyone have any recommendation on a good seatpost rack & bag to go with
    it????
     
    Tags:


  2. Iguana

    Iguana Guest

    Dilbert Firestorm wrote:
    > anyone have any recommendation on a good seatpost rack & bag to go
    > with it????


    Check out Topeak, they have very decent seatpost racks with Quick Release,
    bags that snap onto the rack, pannier supports that attach solely to the
    rack, and the bags have folded panniers.

    Good prices too.

    I picked up the MTX variety rack, bag, and pannier supports for my MTB when
    I'm out doing 160km+ rides on fireroads/rail trails. Installs in 30 seconds,
    comes off even faster!
     
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    In article <[email protected]>,
    Dilbert Firestorm <scanb*nospam*[email protected]*i-55*nospam*.com> wrote:
    >anyone have any recommendation on a good seatpost rack & bag to go with
    >it????
    >


    _ Depending on how much volume you want you might look at these
    bags

    http://www.detours.us/site/gear_frames.html

    _ They're very well made and have some nice features.
    REI carries them so you can stop by and have a look.

    _ Booker C. Bense

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  4. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Iguana" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Dilbert Firestorm wrote:
    > > anyone have any recommendation on a good seatpost rack & bag to go
    > > with it????

    >
    > Check out Topeak, they have very decent seatpost racks with Quick Release,
    > bags that snap onto the rack, pannier supports that attach solely to the
    > rack, and the bags have folded panniers.
    >

    I second the Topeak recommendation. The QR rack and trunks that snap on are
    very handy. I use it on both my town bike MTB and my road bike commuter.
    Highly recommended. Performance often runs a combo deal, also.
     
  5. Gooserider wrote:

    >"Iguana" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    >>Dilbert Firestorm wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>anyone have any recommendation on a good seatpost rack & bag to go
    >>>with it????
    >>>
    >>>

    >>Check out Topeak, they have very decent seatpost racks with Quick Release,
    >>bags that snap onto the rack, pannier supports that attach solely to the
    >>rack, and the bags have folded panniers.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >I second the Topeak recommendation. The QR rack and trunks that snap on are
    >very handy. I use it on both my town bike MTB and my road bike commuter.
    >Highly recommended. Performance often runs a combo deal, also.
    >
    >
    >
    >

    what's the rule of thumb on the size of bags?


    I'm planning on getting into a daily commute ride. I figure the bag to
    be carrying carrying my work clothes, shoes, some food, tools, air-pump,
    and spare tubes and a place to store the cell phone in, just in case it
    rains.

    is that too much stuff to be carrying?
     
  6. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Fri, 28 May 2004 20:47:29 -0400, Dilbert Firestorm wrote:

    >
    > is that too much stuff to be carrying?


    not if you need it...a lot of folks who bike to work do car or commute
    otherwise non-bike once per week and drop of clothes at the office to save
    on the hassle.

    Do remember that the clamp on racks have a lower load capacity than the
    bolt on versions. 20lbs is a pretty standard maximum figure for this type.
    If you get the version with the "sides" that can handle regular panniers,
    you might like the feel of those better than a rack trunk, the center of
    gravity will be lower.

    Another thing to consider: the more you carry, the better workout you'll
    get..so ditch the laptop and bring the desktop...

    :D
     
  7. >I'm planning on getting into a daily commute ride. I figure the bag to
    >be carrying carrying my work clothes, shoes, some food, tools, air-pump,
    >and spare tubes and a place to store the cell phone in, just in case it
    >rains.


    >is that too much stuff to be carrying?


    Depends. I have a short commute, and I work in a casual office.

    I don't carry anything I don't need on a given day. If I have a
    known meeting or whatever I'll carry business casual in with me
    rolled in a bag. Otherwise it's riding clothes all day.

    We're pretty sloppy about uniforms in my workplace.

    And I'm pretty radical as a bicycle commuter.

    This is going to depend on your employer's suppression level, however.

    It's definitely a good idea to be able to fix a flat on the road
    and carry the appropriate equipment.

    In fact I do not, I keep a set of bicycle tools including a pump
    at my desk, so that if I flat I can take care of it at work.

    I do manage to show up on time with appropriate dress and so
    forth, not stinking of gasoline and sweat.

    It's an art. I do get kisses and compliments from some, they
    appreciate my half-hour antibacterial showers in the morning
    and my Tide With Bleach one-day use No Tolerance Policy on riding
    clothes.


    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________
    ------------------"Buddy Holly, the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  8. Iguana

    Iguana Guest

    Dilbert Firestorm wrote:
    > Gooserider wrote:
    >
    >> "Iguana" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>
    >>> Dilbert Firestorm wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> anyone have any recommendation on a good seatpost rack & bag to go
    >>>> with it????
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Check out Topeak, they have very decent seatpost racks with Quick
    >>> Release, bags that snap onto the rack, pannier supports that attach
    >>> solely to the rack, and the bags have folded panniers.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> I second the Topeak recommendation. The QR rack and trunks that snap
    >> on are very handy. I use it on both my town bike MTB and my road
    >> bike commuter. Highly recommended. Performance often runs a combo
    >> deal, also.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > what's the rule of thumb on the size of bags?
    >
    >
    > I'm planning on getting into a daily commute ride. I figure the bag
    > to be carrying carrying my work clothes, shoes, some food, tools,
    > air-pump, and spare tubes and a place to store the cell phone in,
    > just in case it rains.
    >
    > is that too much stuff to be carrying?


    With the Topeak bags, you'd be looking at having to go with the MTX bag with
    side panniers, in fact better to get the MTX DX with side panniers, it has
    an expandable top and should hold all that, as long as your shoes are not
    some NBA giant size.

    http://www.topeak.com/2004/products/bag_011.html

    which means you'd need to get the MTX rack, and also the dual side frames
    for MTX.

    http://www.topeak.com/2004/products/rack_001.html
    http://www.topeak.com/2004/products/rack_008.html
     
  9. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, scanb*nospam*
    [email protected]*i-55*nospam*.com says...
    > Gooserider wrote:
    >
    > >"Iguana" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >
    > >>Dilbert Firestorm wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>anyone have any recommendation on a good seatpost rack & bag to go
    > >>>with it????
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>Check out Topeak, they have very decent seatpost racks with Quick Release,
    > >>bags that snap onto the rack, pannier supports that attach solely to the
    > >>rack, and the bags have folded panniers.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    > >I second the Topeak recommendation. The QR rack and trunks that snap on are
    > >very handy. I use it on both my town bike MTB and my road bike commuter.
    > >Highly recommended. Performance often runs a combo deal, also.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >

    > what's the rule of thumb on the size of bags?
    >
    >
    > I'm planning on getting into a daily commute ride. I figure the bag to
    > be carrying carrying my work clothes, shoes, some food, tools, air-pump,
    > and spare tubes and a place to store the cell phone in, just in case it
    > rains.
    >
    > is that too much stuff to be carrying?


    Not necessarily, though some people will drive once a week, and take the
    whole week's worth of clothes to work and leave them there, so they
    don't have to carry them (and the shoes) on the bike. That said, any
    good-sized rack trunk bag should do what you need. Look at Performance
    Bike and Nashbar; they both carry a wide selection.



    --
    Dave Kerber
    Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  10. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Dilbert Firestorm" <scanb*nospam*[email protected]*i-55*nospam*.com> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > >I second the Topeak recommendation. The QR rack and trunks that snap on

    are
    > >very handy. I use it on both my town bike MTB and my road bike commuter.
    > >Highly recommended. Performance often runs a combo deal, also.
    > >
    > >

    > what's the rule of thumb on the size of bags?
    >
    >
    > I'm planning on getting into a daily commute ride. I figure the bag to
    > be carrying carrying my work clothes, shoes, some food, tools, air-pump,
    > and spare tubes and a place to store the cell phone in, just in case it
    > rains.
    >
    > is that too much stuff to be carrying?
    >

    I use the Topeak rack trunk referred to above. It will hold bike stuff
    (lights, light cable lock, combination tool, patch kit, spare tube) in the
    side and top pockets. The main compartment is big enough for a 6 pack, and
    expands so there's room above, so measure your clothes against that
    standard.

    With regard specifically to your list, here's what I do:
    work clothes - underwear, socks and shirt. Pants more rarely (keep at work,
    swap on days I don't bike in). There's enough space to stuff a jacket in if
    it is cool in the morning but hot in the afternoon.
    shoes - keep at work
    some food - even on a 18-20 mile one-way commute, I usually don't eat. If
    I'm hungry, I stop at a store.
    tools - in trunk
    air-pump - on frame,
    and spare tubes - in trunk; just carry one plus a patch kit.
    and a place to store the cell phone in, just in case it rains - don't carry;
    taking the train home is my backup.
    I'm carrying less stuff, but your logistics may be different than mine.

    There's a picture of this rack trunk on my daily commute on this page: (2nd
    last picture)
    http://hometown.aol.com/mikekr/myhomepage/bike_commute_part2.htm
     
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