Seattle visit

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Bob, Jul 29, 2005.

  1. Bob

    Bob Guest

    I'll be in Seattle for three nights in mid-September. Any recommendations
    for places to visit and/or eat?

    (I've got an old post from Alex Rast where he recommends the Seattle Art
    Museum as a must-see, and he recommends Gelatiamo, Piroshky Piroshky, the
    Sea Garden, and Kabul as places to eat.)

    Bob
     
    Tags:


  2. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'll be in Seattle for three nights in mid-September. Any recommendations
    > for places to visit and/or eat?
    >
    > (I've got an old post from Alex Rast where he recommends the Seattle Art
    > Museum as a must-see, and he recommends Gelatiamo, Piroshky Piroshky, the
    > Sea Garden, and Kabul as places to eat.)
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >


    When I go to Seattle, I always have to go to Duke's Chowderhouse for their
    Dungeness Crab Chowder with Bourbon. If you don't mind a few thousand
    calories, it's absolutely fantastically to die for. They also have great
    salads, great fish entrees, wonderful steamed clams and nice ambience.

    kili
     
  3. Matt

    Matt Guest

    "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'll be in Seattle for three nights in mid-September. Any recommendations
    > for places to visit and/or eat?
    >
    > (I've got an old post from Alex Rast where he recommends the Seattle Art
    > Museum as a must-see, and he recommends Gelatiamo, Piroshky Piroshky, the
    > Sea Garden, and Kabul as places to eat.)


    How much did you want to spend on food? I agree on the Piroshky. For
    higher-end eating there's Harvest Vine, a Spanish/Basque tapas place.
    Dahlia Lounge for seafood.

    Less pricey, I really like Cedar's in the U. District for
    Indian/middle-eastern.
     
  4. [email protected]_spammer.biz writes:
    >I'll be in Seattle for three nights in mid-September. Any recommendations
    >for places to visit and/or eat?
    >
    >(I've got an old post from Alex Rast where he recommends the Seattle Art
    >Museum as a must-see, and he recommends Gelatiamo, Piroshky Piroshky, the
    >Sea Garden, and Kabul as places to eat.)


    I'll second Gelatiamo though I haven't been there in a while.

    Try Yarmaka Cafe before Piroshky Piroshky - I love their stuffed cabbage:

    http://www.seattleweekly.com/food/restaurants/cafyarmarka.php

    From the creative food / finer dining category try Matt's in the Market:

    http://www.seattleweekly.com/food/restaurants/mattsinthemarket.php

    On the other end of the spectrum is Dick's drive in restaurants:

    http://www.ddir.com
     
  5. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Matt wrote:

    > How much did you want to spend on food? I agree on the Piroshky. For
    > higher-end eating there's Harvest Vine, a Spanish/Basque tapas place.
    > Dahlia Lounge for seafood.
    >
    > Less pricey, I really like Cedar's in the U. District for
    > Indian/middle-eastern.


    Thanks for the recommendations. As far as budget, the sky's the limit. (But
    then it *is* only for three nights!)

    That reminds me: I'm picking someone up at the airport just after 11 PM on a
    Friday night. Is there decent food to be had in Seattle or Tacoma at that
    hour?

    Bob
     
  6. aem

    aem Guest

    Bob wrote:
    > I'll be in Seattle for three nights in mid-September. Any recommendations
    > for places to visit and/or eat?
    >

    Wild Ginger. Creative, but for taste's sake, not just to be novel,
    several Asian cuisines represented, large, trendy, downtown (Third St.,
    I think). Really good food. The only drawback is that there is so
    much that sounds good on the menu you want to come back several times
    just to try it all. Come to think of it, there are probably reviews
    that would serve as a guide to the menu if you were going with a group.
    -aem
     
  7. aem

    aem Guest

    aem wrote:
    > Bob wrote:
    > > I'll be in Seattle for three nights in mid-September. Any recommendations
    > > for places to visit and/or eat?
    > >

    > Wild Ginger. Creative, but for taste's sake, not just to be novel,
    > several Asian cuisines represented, large, trendy, downtown (Third St.,
    > I think). Really good food. The only drawback is that there is so
    > much that sounds good on the menu you want to come back several times
    > just to try it all. Come to think of it, there are probably reviews
    > that would serve as a guide to the menu if you were going with a group.
    > -aem


    No, Third Avenue.
     
  8. Alex Rast

    Alex Rast Guest

    at Fri, 29 Jul 2005 20:54:01 GMT in <42ea9722$0$91670$bb4e3ad8
    @newscene.com>, [email protected]_spammer.biz (Bob) wrote :

    >I'll be in Seattle for three nights in mid-September. Any recommendations
    >for places to visit and/or eat?
    >
    >(I've got an old post from Alex Rast where he recommends the Seattle Art
    >Museum as a must-see,


    The real must-see is the Seattle Asian Art Museum. The "straight" SAM
    downtown is good but SAAM up the hill in Volunteer Park is great. However,
    when you visit SAM, you get a free ticket to SAAM within the week, so you
    can kill 2 birds with one admission stone.

    Along different lines, provided the weather is good, Seward Park is a good
    way to see old-growth forest without having to drive outside the city. You
    have to take the trails that go into the interior of the park, though -
    don't just take the paved loop trail around the lakefront or you'll miss
    the forest part. But you can take a trail through the middle that winds up
    connecting with the lakefront loop at the tip of the park, and thus combine
    both in the same visit. Nice place to bring a picnic, too.

    and he recommends Gelatiamo,

    In mid-september you should pick the hazelnut flavour which is one of their
    best (perhaps only the blueberry is better but it peaks in August). They
    let you pick multiple flavours per size (small=2, medium=3, large=4) but
    IMHO it's best to pick out one flavour rather than combine 2 or more and
    create either disappointment with one or more flavours or a combination
    that just doesn't harmonise well.

    Don't be fooled by their new competitors, Bottega Italiana, situated in the
    Pike Place Market. BI has a more modish look and handsome Italian servers
    with thick accents, but while their ice creams are good, Gelatiamo's are
    better overall. A lot of the local reviewers I think have been fooled, to
    be honest, I think, charmed by the servers since most of the reviewers
    locally have been women. Gelatiamo I think seems too polished in
    appearance, too American in the help, for the reviewers to be able to see
    through. It's yet another case of people judging a book by its cover.

    Did I mention Caffe D'Arte for coffee? If not this is the best espresso
    store in a city famous for espresso. It's on 2nd and Stewart, a stone's
    throw from the Pike Place Market.

    > Piroshky Piroshky, the
    >Sea Garden, and Kabul as places to eat.)


    There are some new places that have opened up, too, that are exciting and
    good. The Marrakesh is a good Moroccan restaurant in Belltown, just north
    of the downtown core. Belltown is the restaurant district, as it were, so
    if you're in the mood you can simply park and random-walk until you find a
    restaurant that catches your eye.

    La Vita e' Bella not far away has good pizza - something of a first for
    Seattle. However, I should be clear that we're talking good, not great.

    Essential Baking now has a nice retail shop. Essential bakes the best bread
    in Seattle, makes the best pastries, and produces the best chocolates quite
    possibly in the USA. That's not just my opinion, either: William Leahmann
    headed up the winning team at the World Cup of Baking in Paris, as well as
    winning multiple categories in Next Generation Chocolatier competition.
    Among the chocolates the one to try is the Essential 70% - the ultimate
    ganache chocolate. Among the breads I favour the ciabatta (take this with
    you on a picnic to Seward Park).

    Did I also talk about the Metropolitan Grill as a good splurge restaurant
    for steak? If not and you like steak, you should go. Don't be tempted,
    however, to move away from the steaks in terms of dinner selections or
    you'll be missing the point.

    Also, don't think of seafood restaurants in Seattle. Sadly, Seattle's
    seafood restaurants are all uniformly uninspiring. Again, you can have
    *good* fish at any number of different locations: Flying Fish, Oceanaire,
    Ray's Boathouse, etc. etc., but *great* fish isn't to be had by eating out.
    It's something, in fact, of a Seattle malaise, that as you reach the upper
    restaurant tier, there is, it seems, a quality ceiling, so that with the
    exception of the Metropolitan Grill, even what are called "elite"
    restaurants are nothing more than passable high-end establishments, serving
    passable food. Critics around here lap it up and seem to suffer from a lack
    of imagination when thinking about how good a restaurant can be. They don't
    look for or expect a restaurant to be truly transporting or revelatory in
    quality and thus that kind of dining experience isn't usually to be had
    here.


    --
    Alex Rast
    [email protected]
    (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
     
  9. Alex Rast

    Alex Rast Guest

    at Fri, 29 Jul 2005 23:19:02 GMT in
    <[email protected]>, [email protected]_spammer.biz
    (Bob) wrote :

    >Matt wrote:
    >
    >> How much did you want to spend on food? I agree on the Piroshky. For
    >> higher-end eating there's Harvest Vine, a Spanish/Basque tapas place.
    >> Dahlia Lounge for seafood.
    >>
    >> Less pricey, I really like Cedar's in the U. District for
    >> Indian/middle-eastern.

    >
    >Thanks for the recommendations. As far as budget, the sky's the limit.
    >(But then it *is* only for three nights!)
    >
    >That reminds me: I'm picking someone up at the airport just after 11 PM
    >on a Friday night. Is there decent food to be had in Seattle or Tacoma
    >at that hour?
    >

    You should drive straight to the Sea Garden. It's open until 3 am. Food is
    good, it won't break the bank, and it's not too elaborate, too fussy, or
    too reservations-required to be the sort of hassle and overly exhausting
    experience you don't need after having picked someone up late from the
    airport.


    --
    Alex Rast
    [email protected]
    (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
     
  10. aem

    aem Guest

    Alex Rast wrote:
    > [snips]
    > Did I also talk about the Metropolitan Grill as a good splurge restaurant
    > for steak? If not and you like steak, you should go. Don't be tempted,
    > however, to move away from the steaks in terms of dinner selections or
    > you'll be missing the point.


    Yes, think classic high end steak house -- wooden plank floors, simple
    but well-matched side dishes, cigars after dinner (not in the
    restaurant anymore), emphasis on prime-grade, thick cut, succulent
    beef. If that's what you're in the mood for. -aem
     
  11. sd

    sd Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Alex Rast) wrote:

    > Also, don't think of seafood restaurants in Seattle. Sadly, Seattle's
    > seafood restaurants are all uniformly uninspiring. Again, you can have
    > *good* fish at any number of different locations: Flying Fish, Oceanaire,
    > Ray's Boathouse, etc. etc., but *great* fish isn't to be had by eating out.
    > It's something, in fact, of a Seattle malaise, that as you reach the upper
    > restaurant tier, there is, it seems, a quality ceiling, so that with the
    > exception of the Metropolitan Grill, even what are called "elite"
    > restaurants are nothing more than passable high-end establishments, serving
    > passable food. Critics around here lap it up and seem to suffer from a lack
    > of imagination when thinking about how good a restaurant can be. They don't
    > look for or expect a restaurant to be truly transporting or revelatory in
    > quality and thus that kind of dining experience isn't usually to be had
    > here.


    Interestingly, the Oceanaire here in Minneapolis probably is by good
    measure the finest seafood restaurant in town (second place is held
    down by a Chinese restaurant (Shuang Cheng) that does marvelous
    things with seafood. McCormick & Schmick's is a few rungs down that
    ladder. I would imagine Oceanaire here is serving much the same fare
    being served at the Seattle edition, since the same fish is flown
    in. So it's a matter of perspective and local competition. Oh, to
    live in a town where a restaurant as good as Oceanaire is considered
    "passable."

    sd
     
  12. For places to visit:

    Pike Place Market. Yes, it's full of tourists, but it's also a magnet
    for residents. The Market is the beating heart of Seattle's downtown.

    I'll second the recommendation for Caffé d'Arte, which is just above the
    Market, at 2nd Ave and Stewart. If you like coffee, but thought
    espresso was too bitter, you need to try it at C d'A, perhaps their wood
    roasted blend. It will be a revelation.

    The downtown branch of the Seattle Library is worth a stop if you are
    interested in cutting edge architecture. The building was designed by
    Rem Koolhaas, and it is stunning.

    If you are into outdoor activities, you might like to visit the flagship
    REI store (Stewart and Eastlake, north of downtown). This is a mecca
    for bicyclists, kayakers, hikers, climbers, campers, etc.

    If you have a bent for rubber rats, brain-shaped Jello molds, and
    similar silly or absurd toys, you will find tons of this stuff at Archie
    McPhee's (in Ballard).

    Aviation buffs like to visit the Museum of Flight at Boeing Field.

    The Museum of Glass is a bit further away, in Tacoma, but it has one of
    the country's largest collections of art glass, including many by Dale
    Chihuly, who lives and works nearby.

    If you have time, a ferry ride out to Bainbridge Island is a great way
    to catch some sea air and some nice views.

    As for restaurants, my standards might not be as high as Alex's. I've
    had good seafood at a number of Seattle restaurants. Ray's boathouse
    may not be the cutting edge of culinary artistry, but they are quite
    competent, and the atmosphere is pleasant. Because of our northern
    latitude, you can dine there at 9pm and enjoy a beautiful sunset over
    Shilshole Bay.

    Actually, my favorite seafood items in Seattle are found at a couple of
    very modest establishments. I love the clams in black bean sauce at
    Hing Loon Seafood, in the International District. Thai Dusit (25th Ave
    NE and Blakely) serves a fabulous salmon in red curry. Not always on
    the menu, but whenever I've asked for it, they were able to make it.

    I second the recommendation for Wild Ginger.

    Etta's (near the Market) is justly famous for their cocoanut cream pie.

    Agua Verde (university district) has very good and reasonably price
    Mexican food, with a menu that deviates from the usual list of burritos,
    tacos, and greaseblobs. They also have a patio overlooking Portage Bay.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander
     
  13. One time on Usenet, "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> said:

    > I'll be in Seattle for three nights in mid-September. Any recommendations
    > for places to visit and/or eat?
    >
    > (I've got an old post from Alex Rast where he recommends the Seattle Art
    > Museum as a must-see, and he recommends Gelatiamo, Piroshky Piroshky, the
    > Sea Garden, and Kabul as places to eat.)


    I don't haunt Seattle as much as I used to, but the last time we ate at
    the Space Needle, it was awful. Go for the view, avoid the food...

    --
    Jani in WA (S'mee)
    ~ mom, VidGamer, novice cook, dieter ~
     
  14. One time on Usenet, [email protected] said:
    > [email protected]_spammer.biz writes:
    > >I'll be in Seattle for three nights in mid-September. Any recommendations
    > >for places to visit and/or eat?
    > >
    > >(I've got an old post from Alex Rast where he recommends the Seattle Art
    > >Museum as a must-see, and he recommends Gelatiamo, Piroshky Piroshky, the
    > >Sea Garden, and Kabul as places to eat.)

    >
    > I'll second Gelatiamo though I haven't been there in a while.
    >
    > Try Yarmaka Cafe before Piroshky Piroshky - I love their stuffed cabbage:
    >
    > http://www.seattleweekly.com/food/restaurants/cafyarmarka.php
    >
    > From the creative food / finer dining category try Matt's in the Market:
    >
    > http://www.seattleweekly.com/food/restaurants/mattsinthemarket.php
    >
    > On the other end of the spectrum is Dick's drive in restaurants:
    >
    > http://www.ddir.com


    OMG, I haven't eaten at Dick's since I was a struggling college
    student -- for cheap food, it's not bad...

    --
    Jani in WA (S'mee)
    ~ mom, VidGamer, novice cook, dieter ~
     
  15. One time on Usenet, "aem" <[email protected]> said:
    > Alex Rast wrote:


    > > [snips]
    > > Did I also talk about the Metropolitan Grill as a good splurge restaurant
    > > for steak? If not and you like steak, you should go. Don't be tempted,
    > > however, to move away from the steaks in terms of dinner selections or
    > > you'll be missing the point.

    >
    > Yes, think classic high end steak house -- wooden plank floors, simple
    > but well-matched side dishes, cigars after dinner (not in the
    > restaurant anymore), emphasis on prime-grade, thick cut, succulent
    > beef. If that's what you're in the mood for. -aem


    http://www.themetropolitangrill.com/metgrill/metgrill.html

    When I attended school in Seattle, I lived in Bremerton and had to
    take the ferry. I often walked past the Metropolitan Grill on my way
    to Coleman Dock, and I wished I could afford to check it out. Now that
    I can, it sounds like I really should...

    --
    Jani in WA (S'mee)
    ~ mom, VidGamer, novice cook, dieter ~
     
  16. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sat, 30 Jul 2005 12:27:36 -0400, Dee Randall wrote:
    >
    > Don't eat the prosciutt' & melon -- yikes, I can still taste their
    > prosciutt. It's awful that I can remember that and nothing else good about
    > the dinner I had there many years ago; and I know it had to be good from
    > what others say. I hate to admit that it was one of those times that I spit
    > out my food into my napkin. I'm almost wretching again -- tee hee!
    > I could not afford the dinner myself, a rich relative took my husband and I
    > there; otherwise perhaps I would've tried to choke the appetizer down.
    > Previously, a Vashon Island resident and ferry rider in the 70's and 80's.
    > Dee Dee
    >

    I don't like prosciutto either - no matter what the price and how
    ritzy the restaurant.
     
  17. Kevin_Sheehy

    Kevin_Sheehy Guest

    sf wrote on July 30, 2005:

    > I don't like prosciutto either - no matter what the price and how
    > ritzy the restaurant.


    Dee didn't say that she doesn't like prosciutto. Maybe she doesn't, but
    that's not what she said. Reading a bit between the lines, I believe
    she said or implied that she didn't like it at a particular Seattle
    restaurant.

    Your turn for a typical snide, dismissive reply - if any.
     
  18. sf

    sf Guest

    On 30 Jul 2005 14:18:21 -0700, Kevin_Sheehy wrote:

    > Your turn for a typical snide, dismissive reply - if any.


    Here it is:
     
  19. On 29 Jul 2005 18:19:02 -0500, "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz>
    wrote:

    >That reminds me: I'm picking someone up at the airport just after 11 PM on a
    >Friday night. Is there decent food to be had in Seattle or Tacoma at that
    >hour?


    13 Coins has some support. They're open 24/7.
    --
    -denny-

    "I don't like it when a whole state starts
    acting like a marital aid."
    "John R. Campbell" in a Usenet post.
     
  20. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > I'll be in Seattle for three nights in mid-September. Any recommendations
    > for places to visit and/or eat?
    >
    > (I've got an old post from Alex Rast where he recommends the Seattle Art
    > Museum as a must-see, and he recommends Gelatiamo, Piroshky Piroshky, the
    > Sea Garden, and Kabul as places to eat.)
    >

    I would add a trip to Uwajimaya in the International District, just east
    of Qwest and Safeco Fields (the football and baseball stadiums,
    respectively). You will see all kinds of unusual foods, including the
    infamous geoduck. It does have a food court, but I recommend hiking
    into the ID to the aforementioned Hing Loon or the Phnom Penh Noodle
    House.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
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