Secret food shame

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Yeff, Feb 12, 2005.

  1. skoonj

    skoonj Guest

    "Kilikini" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > skoonj wrote:
    >> <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> Peanut butter (creamy) and bacon sammiches
    >>>
    >>> Pops
    >>>

    >>
    >> Peanut butter and cotto salami sandwiches.
    >>
    >> -

    >
    > I've done peanut butter and salami, but I was also very young and very
    > high at the time. LOL
    >
    > kili


    Then I bet you ate it without bread :)

    -T
     


  2. jacqui{JB}

    jacqui{JB} Guest

    "Nathalie Chiva" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:p[email protected]

    > >> My Beef Wellington recipe. The results are
    > >> delicious, but I cringe whan I get asked for
    > >> the recipe, it's so trashy...


    > >So ... do tell. :)


    > Well, it involves beef filet (that's the non-
    > trashy part), canned mushrooms (it really
    > isn't any better with fresh stewed ones, I
    > tried), storebought puff pastry dough (that's
    > the one dough I can't make), and a tube of
    > liver paste. You brown the filet in a bit of oil
    > in a frying pan, let it cool, warm the oven
    > (240°C, 480°F). You put the contents of the
    > liver paste tube evenly on the dough, leaving a
    > 1 inch border all around. Then you distribute
    > the mushrooms evenly on the liver paste, season
    > the beef with salt and pepper, lay it down on the
    > prepared dough, roll it in the dough, close the
    > dough around it, brush with egg yolk if you wish,
    > and put in the oven. When the pastry is done, the
    > filet is also.
    >
    > But it's great, and people keep asking for the recipe,
    > oh the shame of me!


    :) Yes, turn in your toque immediately.

    Seriously, though, there's nothing wrong with taking shortcuts, and
    certainly nothing wrong with taking shortcuts using quality
    ingredients, which it sounds like you do. So the pate comes from a
    tube -- there are some Very Good Things which come in tubes these days
    (down, boys, down -- that's not what I mean). And it's certainly no
    sin to use prepared puff pastry or canned mushrooms.

    Rest easy, you're committing no cardinal cooking sins. :)
    -j
     
  3. jacqui{JB}

    jacqui{JB} Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > > Beefaroni!


    > Franco American Spaghetti-O's with mini meatballs!


    Heh. Reminds me of one of my best received potluck dishes: Chef
    BoyArdee meat raviolis (two big cans) layered in the crockpot with
    slices of American Cheese (decent sliced stuff, not the
    individually-wrapped ones). I can't eat it anymore, but people really
    love it. On the rare occasions I used to take it to office potlucks,
    I never had to take any home.
    -j
     
  4. jacqui{JB}

    jacqui{JB} Guest

    "TheAlligator" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Snoot sandwiches. "snoot on wheat, sauce on
    > the side". First time I ordered one (ethnic area
    > of a town) the girl stared at me. I said "what?"
    > And she said (i swear) "ain't no white man ever
    > ate a snoot". Hard to find a good one, but when
    > you do, it's heaven. Alas, no more of these in my
    > future, unless I plan for a hospital vacation!


    Okay, I'll bite. What's snoot? I gather it's prolly a nose-bit, but
    from what animal?
    -j
     
  5. -L.

    -L. Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Lyn: You could never be a San Franciscan if the smell and taste of
    > sourdough makes you vomit....too bad
    > Best wishes,
    > Ellie
    > How about corn rye?


    I lived in the Bay Area for 3 years, as a matter of fact! ;) I know a
    couple SFers who don't like it, either.

    Never had corn rye...

    -L.
     
  6. chillled

    chillled Guest

    BookWight wrote:

    > Girl Scout Mint Cookies. Polished off an entire box at one sitting more
    > than once.


    You're not alone. A box never lasts 24 hours in this household.
     
  7. Connie

    Connie Guest


    >Yeff wrote:
    >> Cornflakes? The soggier the better.



    Mayonnaise sandwiches: bread and mayo only.
    Potted meat product on white bread.
    Fried salami with a slice of American cheese.
    Baked Beenie Weenies.
     
  8. Connie <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >Potted meat product on white bread.


    Just curious ... have you read the ingredient list on the label?

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  9. Bob

    Bob Guest

    jacqui{JB} asked:

    >> Snoot sandwiches. "snoot on wheat, sauce on
    >> the side". First time I ordered one (ethnic area
    >> of a town) the girl stared at me. I said "what?"
    >> And she said (i swear) "ain't no white man ever
    >> ate a snoot". Hard to find a good one, but when
    >> you do, it's heaven. Alas, no more of these in my
    >> future, unless I plan for a hospital vacation!

    >
    > Okay, I'll bite. What's snoot? I gather it's prolly a nose-bit, but
    > from what animal?


    Barbecued pig snout.

    Bob
     
  10. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Wayne wrote:

    > Fried egg and onion sandwiches on white bread with mayo and dill pickle
    > spears on the side. Oh, and chips, too.


    What's so shameful about that? Sounds like a good midafternoon snack to me!

    In fact, I think that's what I'll have before I go to work tonight.

    Bob
     
  11. On Mon, 14 Feb 2005 07:36:08 +0100, "jacqui{JB}"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Rest easy, you're committing no cardinal cooking sins. :)
    >-j
    >


    Ah thank you, I feel better ;-)

    Nathalie in Switzerland, planning some beef Wellington on Friday
     
  12. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest


    > >Yeff wrote:
    > >> Cornflakes? The soggier the better.

    >
    >


    Corn Flakes and melted Vanilla Ice Cream

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  13. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    kalanamak wrote:
    > cream cheese mashed with Pace picante salsa and corn chips


    Hey, I like that too with beans, cream cheese, salsa, guacamole, cheddar
    cheese, olives and tortilla chips. Good stuff!

    kili
     
  14. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    Priscilla Ballou wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > The Cook <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> ravinwulf <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Errrm, I really don't know that I should admit this....
    >>>>
    >>>> Eagle sweetened condensed milk. Straight out of the can, eaten
    >>>> with a spoon.
    >>>
    >>> I've got an equally (maybe more) hideous one. Brown sugar and
    >>> butter, microwaved, with a touch of vanilla at the end. It's
    >>> gritty as hell, but tastes a little caramelly (new word).
    >>>
    >>> Carol

    >>
    >> Never thought about nuking it. I just softened the butter and mashed
    >> it up. Eat it on bread. My other favorite is peanut butter and Karo
    >> Syrup. Plenty of fat and sugar.

    >
    > When I was a kid I sometimes ate white bread with butter and a thick
    > layer of brown sugar. I'm not quite sure why my somewhat puritanical
    > mother permitted it, but she did!
    >
    > Priscilla


    Okay, now that we're going there, how about toasted peanut butter and honey
    sandwiches? I loved to add butter to the bread too. God, now that's a
    little taste of heaven.

    kili
     
  15. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    Ginny Sher wrote:
    > On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 17:31:07 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The Cook <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:
    >>
    >>> Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> ravinwulf <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Errrm, I really don't know that I should admit this....
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Eagle sweetened condensed milk. Straight out of the can, eaten
    >>>>> with a spoon.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've got an equally (maybe more) hideous one. Brown sugar and
    >>>> butter, microwaved, with a touch of vanilla at the end. It's
    >>>> gritty as hell, but tastes a little caramelly (new word).
    >>>>
    >>>> Carol
    >>>
    >>> Never thought about nuking it. I just softened the butter and
    >>> mashed
    >>> it up. Eat it on bread. My other favorite is peanut butter and
    >>> Karo Syrup. Plenty of fat and sugar.

    >>
    >> It's good to know I'm not the only hard-core sugar addict. I like
    >> peanut butter with honey. :)
    >>
    >> Carol

    >
    > Peanut butter 'n honey is fantastic. I had many a sandwich made with
    > that... and sometimes a sliced banana on top.
    >
    > Ginny


    Dang, Ginny, you beat me to it. Okay, don't read my previous post. LOL.
    Serves me right for not checking the NG sooner.

    kili
     
  16. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    skoonj wrote:
    > "Kilikini" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> skoonj wrote:
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>> Peanut butter (creamy) and bacon sammiches
    >>>>
    >>>> Pops
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Peanut butter and cotto salami sandwiches.
    >>>
    >>> -

    >>
    >> I've done peanut butter and salami, but I was also very young and
    >> very high at the time. LOL
    >>
    >> kili

    >
    > Then I bet you ate it without bread :)
    >
    > -T


    Nope, ate it with bread "grilled" on the bottom of a coffee maker. Hey, we
    were hungry, it was cold and we were in a cabin by a lake with electricy,
    but no gas (stove was gas). We even cooked up some shrimp on that coffee
    maker.........

    kili
     
  17. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    Mike Dickinson wrote:
    > On Mon, 14 Feb 2005 01:54:46 +0000 (UTC), Mike Dickinson
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> My secret food shame is that I really like SPAM.

    >
    > Now I read this again, it's obvious I didn't make this nearly clear
    > enough.
    >
    > I REALLY like SPAM. I can easily eat a 200g can in a very short
    > sitting. I cut up the SPAM into strips and slices, spread or dip each
    > with mustard, creamy horseradish sauce, sandwich pickle, sour
    > cream-based dips... anything I can get my hands on, really! Once
    > dipped or spread, I will scoff them with immense delight.
    >
    > For those of you who don't know what SPAM is, aside from being the
    > Scourge Of The Internet it is in fact 'spiced pork and ham', or
    > 'luncheon meat'. It looks like something else.


    Mike, ever try sauteeing cubed SPAM and green beans? That's a Hawaiian
    staple. You can add slivered almonds too, but don't forget the sesame oil.

    kili
     
  18. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Hahabogus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >> >Yeff wrote:
    >> >> Cornflakes? The soggier the better.


    > Corn Flakes and melted Vanilla Ice Cream


    Okay, I give. I made rice crispies treats this weekend.

    nancy (and I ate some, too)
     
  19. jacqui{JB}

    jacqui{JB} Guest

    "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > > Okay, I'll bite. What's snoot? I gather it's prolly
    > > a nose-bit, but from what animal?


    > Barbecued pig snout.


    Hmmm, sounds very interesting. I'd try it, given the choice.
    -j
     
  20. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    jacqui{JB} wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>> Beefaroni!

    >
    >> Franco American Spaghetti-O's with mini meatballs!

    >
    > Heh. Reminds me of one of my best received potluck dishes: Chef
    > BoyArdee meat raviolis (two big cans) layered in the crockpot with
    > slices of American Cheese (decent sliced stuff, not the
    > individually-wrapped ones). I can't eat it anymore, but people really
    > love it. On the rare occasions I used to take it to office potlucks,
    > I never had to take any home.
    > -j


    That's funny! Wish I'd known that when I was wracking my brain for pot luck
    dishes; I'll keep it in mind. I like frozen (cooked, of course) toasted
    raviolis with a nice pomodoro sauce.

    Jill
     
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