Secret food shame

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Yeff, Feb 12, 2005.

  1. Rich reminded me to mention my love of canned Kraft cheese as another
    shameful food secret.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    --
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    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    See my Blog at: http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
     


  2. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    Ranee Mueller wrote:
    > Rich reminded me to mention my love of canned Kraft cheese as
    > another shameful food secret.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee


    Canned Kraft cheese? I've never heard of it!

    kili
     
  3. [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > Mike Dickinson wrote:
    > > On Mon, 14 Feb 2005 01:54:46 +0000 (UTC), Mike Dickinson
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >My secret food shame is that I really like SPAM.


    [snip]

    > When I was newly married and budget-conscious, we would have it about
    > once a month - our favorite method was to slice and fry it on one side,
    > turn it over, sprinkle with brown sugar and drained crushed pineapple,
    > and let the second side brown. It's really quite tasty, if you don't
    > think about what it actually IS.


    I am a semi-uncloseted SPAM fan. I do enjoy a nice SPAM sandwich with
    mayo and yellow mustard. I used to have them on white bread, but I
    don't eat white bread anymore, so now I have them on lovely stoneground
    whole wheat bread.

    When I was growing up, we'd do the SPAM slices with a half-circle of
    canned pineapple under the broiler. Those were the same years when we
    had a lot of "spanish rice" (rice with tomato, celery, and onion). I
    ended up loving SPAM but hating "spanish rice."

    Priscilla
     
  4. "> Rich reminded me to mention my love of canned Kraft cheese as another
    > shameful food secret.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee


    Oh, the shame...canned? Buy a two pound 'block' of Velveeta,dice some up.
    Nuke a thin milk,flour mixture and add the cheese until the desired
    consistency. Some adjustments may be required. Only barbarians would defile
    the greatness of a pasteurized melting product made by such a company as
    Kraft. It is permissable to add herbs,veggies,etc.,at your discretion.

    Hubert(in Opelika, AL) Liverman.
     
  5. Tess

    Tess Guest

    Okay, my turn ... Oh, this is going to get me SO flamed, I'm sure : )

    Buttermilk. I drink it like a beverage. In fact, I'm a real buttermilk
    afficiando, and know where to get the tastiest kinds. Three or four glasses
    a day. The full-fat kind. And I salt it like salt is going out of style. How
    much do I weigh? 102, but man, I gotta do a LOT of sit-ups!

    - Tess : )
     
  6. Ranee Mueller wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, "kilikini"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Ranee Mueller wrote:
    > > > Rich reminded me to mention my love of canned Kraft cheese as
    > > > another shameful food secret.

    > >
    > > Canned Kraft cheese? I've never heard of it!

    >
    > My mom's family used to bring it with them from Saudi Arabia, and I'd
    > eat it on these terribly fatty crisp crackers which were almost like
    > biscotti, only much more short and savory. Anyway, the kraft cheese
    > there is marketed in a couple ways, one in the can and the other in a
    > glass jar (which you can wash and use as tea glasses when you're
    > finished eating it) which is creamier and spreads. The canned cheese is
    > mostly appealing for the way you get it out of the can, you take off the
    > top and the bottom, and push it out, then you can use the lid to slice
    > it. :) It comes in a blue metal tin, maybe 3 oz and a larger one at 6
    > oz? You can get them in Middle Eastern markets, and probably elsewhere,
    > but that's where I buy them.



    I remember canned cheese from years ago when I worked in the college dorm
    kitchen, the stuff came in BIG institutional - sized cans...

    I've also seen ads for it in old magazines from the 40's...

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  7. Tess wrote:

    > Okay, my turn ... Oh, this is going to get me SO flamed, I'm sure : )
    >
    > Buttermilk. I drink it like a beverage. In fact, I'm a real buttermilk
    > afficiando, and know where to get the tastiest kinds. Three or four

    glasses
    > a day. The full-fat kind. And I salt it like salt is going out of style.

    How
    > much do I weigh? 102, but man, I gotta do a LOT of sit-ups!
    >



    IIRC buttermilk has less fat than even skim milk...it's a very healthy habit
    you've got there.

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  8. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Tess wrote:
    > Okay, my turn ... Oh, this is going to get me SO flamed, I'm sure : )
    >
    > Buttermilk. I drink it like a beverage.


    Um, buttermilk IS a beverage.

    > Three or four glasses a day. The full-fat kind. How
    > much do I weigh? 102, but man, I gotta do a LOT of sit-ups!


    What do you mean by "full-fat kind"?

    I like buttermilk too... but it's not very fattening, no more than
    nonfat/lowfat milk. Buttermilk of times past was the liquid left after
    butter was churned, contained virtually no fat other than a few tiny
    yellow flecks of butter. Today it is made commercially by adding
    special bacteria to nonfat or lowfat milk, giving it a slightly
    thickened texture and tangy flavor. No one gets fat from drinking
    buttermilk, in fact it's a great appetite supressor that aids in
    dieting for weight loss.
     
  9. Tess

    Tess Guest

    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Tess wrote:
    >> Okay, my turn ... Oh, this is going to get me SO flamed, I'm sure : )
    >>
    >> Buttermilk. I drink it like a beverage.

    >
    > Um, buttermilk IS a beverage.
    >
    >> Three or four glasses a day. The full-fat kind. How
    >> much do I weigh? 102, but man, I gotta do a LOT of sit-ups!

    >
    > What do you mean by "full-fat kind"?
    >
    > I like buttermilk too... but it's not very fattening, no more than
    > nonfat/lowfat milk. Buttermilk of times past was the liquid left after
    > butter was churned, contained virtually no fat other than a few tiny
    > yellow flecks of butter. Today it is made commercially by adding
    > special bacteria to nonfat or lowfat milk, giving it a slightly
    > thickened texture and tangy flavor. No one gets fat from drinking
    > buttermilk, in fact it's a great appetite supressor that aids in
    > dieting for weight loss.


    As opposed to ... what do they call it? 2% butterfat, or lowfat, something
    like that. The best kinds *do* have little butter flecks, and mmmmm, it's
    good : ) The *very* best comes from Crystal River, Florida, and I always
    take an extra cooler, just for bringing some back.

    As to how it's made - I *know* how to make it at home. Saves a lot of money,
    and it's delicious. You have to have some "store bought" to begin with, for
    the culture. Would anybody be interested in the directions?

    We have a little Mom and Pop dairy here, and their buttermilk is just - just
    outstanding. I start off with a quart of it, and can keep making my own from
    it almost all summer.

    Most people think I'm perverted, weird, and just downright gross : ) If you
    think about it, it's not far off from yoghurt at all. I also make a lovely
    potato and buttermilk soup - I think it's Polish.

    Your tangy, salty friend,

    - Tess : )
     
  10. Tess

    Tess Guest

    "Gregory Morrow"
    <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:ZfOQd[email protected]
    >
    > Tess wrote:
    >
    >> Okay, my turn ... Oh, this is going to get me SO flamed, I'm sure : )
    >>
    >> Buttermilk. I drink it like a beverage. In fact, I'm a real buttermilk
    >> afficiando, and know where to get the tastiest kinds. Three or four

    > glasses
    >> a day. The full-fat kind. And I salt it like salt is going out of style.

    > How
    >> much do I weigh? 102, but man, I gotta do a LOT of sit-ups!
    >>

    >
    >
    > IIRC buttermilk has less fat than even skim milk...it's a very healthy
    > habit
    > you've got there.
    >
    > --
    > Best
    > Greg


    Hahaha! Well, I'm not the least bit worried about my calcium intake, and
    it's good for certain ... um ... female malfunctions, too.

    Best back,

    - Tess
     
  11. Tess

    Tess Guest

    Shameful food secrets, eh? Well ...

    Does anyone watch Samantha Brown? She does "Great Hotels" on the travel
    channel. Once, she was in a great villa in Hawaii which had it's own
    butler - and she was taking full advantage of him! She had him bring her a
    .... are you ready for this? A triple-decker peanut butter and Frito
    sandwich. Eek! Has anybody had this? Probably one of those things that
    *sounds* awful, but actually works. How much does *she* weigh? About 12
    pounds : )

    - Tess :D
     
  12. Tess wrote:
    >
    > Okay, my turn ... Oh, this is going to get me SO flamed, I'm sure : )
    >
    > Buttermilk. I drink it like a beverage. In fact, I'm a real buttermilk
    > afficiando, and know where to get the tastiest kinds. Three or four glasses
    > a day. The full-fat kind. And I salt it like salt is going out of style. How
    > much do I weigh? 102, but man, I gotta do a LOT of sit-ups!


    My grandfather used to like a tall glass of cold buttermilk.

    Priscilla
     
  13. On Wed 16 Feb 2005 10:04:10a, Ranee Mueller wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Rich reminded me to mention my love of canned Kraft cheese as another
    > shameful food secret.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee
    >


    I sometimes like the little glass jars of Kraft cheese; Roka Blue, Old
    English, Pimiento, and Pineapple, and I don't care who knows!

    Wayne
     
  14. Ginny Sher

    Ginny Sher Guest

    On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 21:43:41 GMT, "Tess" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Shameful food secrets, eh? Well ...
    >
    >Does anyone watch Samantha Brown? She does "Great Hotels" on the travel
    >channel. Once, she was in a great villa in Hawaii which had it's own
    >butler - and she was taking full advantage of him! She had him bring her a
    >... are you ready for this? A triple-decker peanut butter and Frito
    >sandwich. Eek! Has anybody had this? Probably one of those things that
    >*sounds* awful, but actually works. How much does *she* weigh? About 12
    >pounds : )
    >
    >- Tess :D
    >



    Yeah, baby!

    Ginny
     
  15. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-02-16, Ranee Mueller <[email protected]> wrote:

    > glass jar (which you can wash and use as tea glasses when you're
    > finished eating it) which is creamier and spreads......


    Kraft used to make a half dozen flavors in the jar, my all-time fave
    being the pineapple. Awesome on celery. Most flavors are history
    with only a couple remaining. I think the drop in popularity was not
    so much the cheese as the price. Way too much for flavored/dyed cream
    cheese.

    nb
     
  16. "Tess" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >She had him bring her a
    >... are you ready for this? A triple-decker peanut butter and Frito
    >sandwich. Eek! Has anybody had this? Probably one of those things that
    >*sounds* awful, but actually works.


    Crash loves peanut butter and nacho cheese flavored potato chip sandwiches.

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  17. Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >I sometimes like the little glass jars of Kraft cheese; Roka Blue, Old
    >English, Pimiento, and Pineapple, and I don't care who knows!


    You forgot the green olive one. Fantastic on Ritz crackers.

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  18. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest

    -L. wrote:

    > Dog3 wrote:
    >
    >>I tried it late last night,

    >
    >
    > Glad you enjoyed it. Now you will be an addict, ya know...;)
    >
    > -L.
    >


    Ok, Question. Do you use an *entire* "slab"?
    That would be an aweful lot of velveeta.
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>, notbob
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2005-02-16, Ranee Mueller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > glass jar (which you can wash and use as tea glasses when you're
    > > finished eating it) which is creamier and spreads......

    >
    > Kraft used to make a half dozen flavors in the jar, my all-time fave
    > being the pineapple. Awesome on celery. Most flavors are history
    > with only a couple remaining. I think the drop in popularity was not
    > so much the cheese as the price. Way too much for flavored/dyed cream
    > cheese.


    Oh, no, this was far more artificial than cream cheese that was
    flavored and dyed. I've never seen it in the US, even in the Middle
    Eastern markets (though I will check again), it was pasteurized,
    processed cheese spread, it was tangy, and runnier than cream cheese,
    but not orange like cheez whiz, it was a pale, creamy color with an
    orange tinge to it.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    --
    Remove Do Not and Spam to email

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    See my Blog at: http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
     
  20. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Dog3" <[email protected];ajklsd;ajlds.nutz> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Denise~* <[email protected]> wrote in news:CpSdnVYm4aUAQ47fRVn-


    >> Ok, Question. Do you use an *entire* "slab"?
    >> That would be an aweful lot of velveeta.


    > No, I cut off a chunk. Maybe 1/4 of the slab. I let it melt in butter and
    > toss the popped corn in it. Gawd, it is good. I think one has to melt the
    > cheese product as their taste dictates. I started with 1/4 of the loaf and
    > 1 stick of butter and it worked fine.
    >
    > Michal


    See what happens when you eat Velveeta? You can't even spell your
    own name.

    Sad. nancy
     
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