Secret food shame

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Yeff, Feb 12, 2005.

  1. On Wed 16 Feb 2005 04:27:26p, Damsel in dis Dress wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:
    >
    >>I sometimes like the little glass jars of Kraft cheese; Roka Blue, Old
    >>English, Pimiento, and Pineapple, and I don't care who knows!

    >
    > You forgot the green olive one. Fantastic on Ritz crackers.
    >
    > Carol


    Yep, that one too!!! I luv 'em all!

    Wayne
     


  2. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    "jacqui{JB}" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Hmmm, sounds very interesting. I'd try it, given the choice.

    Will you marry me? :>)
     
  3. jacqui{JB}

    jacqui{JB} Guest

    "TheAlligator" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > >Hmmm, sounds very interesting. I'd try it,

    > given the choice.


    > Will you marry me? :>)


    Not sure what my husband would say about that, although I've always
    liked the idea of having two men. >:)
    -j
     
  4. CaptCook

    CaptCook Guest

    "Damsel in dis Dress" wrote ...
    > >English, Pimiento, and Pineapple, and I don't care who knows!

    > You forgot the green olive one. Fantastic on Ritz crackers.


    Ahhh, good times, good times. When I was a lad the food budget was
    miniscule. The Kraft glasses of sludge were a special treat but
    always pimiento or olive. And Red Devil potted meat. These are not
    my comfort foods.
    But did we have juice glasses....
     
  5. On Thu 17 Feb 2005 07:50:22a, CaptCook wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > "Damsel in dis Dress" wrote ...
    >> >English, Pimiento, and Pineapple, and I don't care who knows!

    >> You forgot the green olive one. Fantastic on Ritz crackers.

    >
    > Ahhh, good times, good times. When I was a lad the food budget was
    > miniscule. The Kraft glasses of sludge were a special treat but
    > always pimiento or olive. And Red Devil potted meat. These are not
    > my comfort foods.
    > But did we have juice glasses....


    And Underwood Devilled Ham...
     
  6. Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Thu 17 Feb 2005 07:50:22a, CaptCook wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > > "Damsel in dis Dress" wrote ...
    > >> >English, Pimiento, and Pineapple, and I don't care who knows!
    > >> You forgot the green olive one. Fantastic on Ritz crackers.

    > >
    > > Ahhh, good times, good times. When I was a lad the food budget was
    > > miniscule. The Kraft glasses of sludge were a special treat but
    > > always pimiento or olive. And Red Devil potted meat. These are

    not
    > > my comfort foods.
    > > But did we have juice glasses....

    >
    > And Underwood Devilled Ham...



    LOL. I have two containers of each -- Kraft cheese(I like the olive
    best) and Underwood deviled ham - in my cupboard right now. And
    they've only been there a week.

    N.
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, "CaptCook" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > "Damsel in dis Dress" wrote ...
    > > >English, Pimiento, and Pineapple, and I don't care who knows!

    > > You forgot the green olive one. Fantastic on Ritz crackers.

    >
    > Ahhh, good times, good times. When I was a lad the food budget was
    > miniscule. The Kraft glasses of sludge were a special treat but
    > always pimiento or olive. And Red Devil potted meat. These are not
    > my comfort foods.
    > But did we have juice glasses....


    When we cleaned out the family home and Mother moved into a retirement
    community, I put a dibs on most of those juice glasses. It's funny the
    things one becomes attached to. ;-)

    Priscilla
    --
    "And what's this crap about Sodomites? It's always Sodomites this and
    Sodomites that. What about us Gomorrahians? We were there too; we
    deserve some mention. Sodom always gets the credit, and Gomorrah always
    does the work." - JohnN in alt.religion.christian.episcopal
     
  8. Priscilla Ballou <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >When we cleaned out the family home and Mother moved into a retirement
    >community, I put a dibs on most of those juice glasses. It's funny the
    >things one becomes attached to. ;-)


    For Crash, it's the huge, yellow Pyrex bowl that his mother used when
    making potato salad.

    For me, it's cooking stuff, but my erstwhile sister commandeered most of
    Mom's stuff to give to my niece. Thank goodness for thrift shops. I have
    a set of aluminum measuring cups and a million pie pans. I very rarely
    make pies, but every time we see a pan like one of Mom's we buy it, because
    neither of us can remember if we've already got one like that.

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Pixmaker
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The world war II "D-Ration" was an olive-drab can of cheese! Very dry
    > cheese as I recall. . . about the size of a large tuna-fish can. It
    > was not a beloved favorite and there were always a lot of them left
    > over as it was the last field ration that was eaten.


    Okay, everyone has to go look for Kraft cheese in a can. It isn't
    dry at all, it's about the consistency of American cheese, or mild
    cheddar.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    --
    Remove Do Not and Spam to email

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    See my Blog at: http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
     
  10. Pixmaker

    Pixmaker Guest

    Oh, my. . . canned cheese.

    The world war II "D-Ration" was an olive-drab can of cheese! Very dry
    cheese as I recall. . . about the size of a large tuna-fish can. It
    was not a beloved favorite and there were always a lot of them left
    over as it was the last field ration that was eaten.

    The great esteem in which this particular ration was held is indicated
    by its slang term, A-hole tightener.

    I know you really wanted to know this!

    Pixmaker in FLL
    ==========================
    It's not the heat, it's the humidity!
    ==========================
    (...Think the humidity's bad?
    You should watch us vote!)
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, Ang and
    Bruce <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I don't think it's available internationally, hey.


    I know it is available in the Middle East, in the US and I'm pretty
    sure Australia, I've labelling on the cans which says something about
    Australia. It may be available other places.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    --
    Remove Do Not and Spam to email

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    See my Blog at: http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
     
  12. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >And Underwood Devilled Ham...

    Oh, man, I forgot about that stuff. Heaven in a can.
     
  13. On Thu 17 Feb 2005 06:25:31p, TheAlligator wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>And Underwood Devilled Ham...

    > Oh, man, I forgot about that stuff. Heaven in a can.
    >


    I always keep a can or two in my desk at work, with a package of crackers,
    just in case I forget to bring lunch or don't have time to go out.

    Wayne
     
  14. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I always keep a can or two in my desk at work, with a package of crackers,
    >just in case I forget to bring lunch or don't have time to go out.

    Wait a minute - you're telling me the steff is still around? Don't
    tease me, man, how do I get some?
     
  15. On Thu 17 Feb 2005 06:41:58p, TheAlligator wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I always keep a can or two in my desk at work, with a package of crackers,
    >>just in case I forget to bring lunch or don't have time to go out.

    > Wait a minute - you're telling me the steff is still around? Don't
    > tease me, man, how do I get some?


    Every supermarket I go to carries it. In most of them it's shelved near the
    canned tuna, sardines, etc. I think they also have a potted corned beef and
    some kind of potted chicken as well. Remember, it's in a can wrapped in
    white paper. The print, IIRC, is black and red.

    Wayne
     
  16. On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 09:04:10 -0800, Ranee Mueller
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Rich reminded me to mention my love of canned Kraft cheese as another
    >shameful food secret.


    The DH loves Kraft's Cheez Whiz. My shameful food secret is <looking
    around to make sure no one is listening> pork rinds <blush!>

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  17. Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    wrote:

    >My shameful food secret is <looking
    >around to make sure no one is listening> pork rinds <blush!>


    I like 'em too. Plus, they have no carbs. :)

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  18. Jude

    Jude Guest

    Priscilla Ballou wrote:


    > When I was a kid I sometimes ate white bread with butter and a thick
    > layer of brown sugar. I'm not quite sure why my somewhat puritanical


    > mother permitted it, but she did!


    Funny, my snack when I was a kid was Wonder bread with butter (actually
    margarine in our house) with rainbow sprinkles on top. Not sure why mom
    let me eat this either, but I never complained!
     
  19. On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 21:11:43 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    >wrote:
    >
    >>My shameful food secret is <looking
    >>around to make sure no one is listening> pork rinds <blush!>

    >
    >I like 'em too. Plus, they have no carbs. :)


    No carbs? Really? I'm going on the Lindora diet on Wednesday...hee
    hee.

    (9 weeks to the Baja California cruise and Bathing Suit Hell)

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  20. Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 21:11:43 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>My shameful food secret is <looking
    >>>around to make sure no one is listening> pork rinds <blush!>

    >>
    >>I like 'em too. Plus, they have no carbs. :)

    >
    >No carbs? Really? I'm going on the Lindora diet on Wednesday...hee
    >hee.


    No carbs, but lots of fat and calories. These are only a good deal if
    you're low-carbing. I dip them in guacamole.

    What's the Lindora diet? I've never heard of it.

    >(9 weeks to the Baja California cruise and Bathing Suit Hell)


    Just pack a few muumuus and enjoy yourself!

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
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