Securing a garage?



KakenBetaal

New Member
Jun 14, 2004
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I have a standard flat garage with a swing-up door. I've mounted an Abus what'sit lock in the concrete floor to lock my bikes to, and I'm wondering what are good options for further securing the garage.

I appreciate that if a thief gains access, he can close the door and work relatively undisturbed/unobserved, so I'm thinking about better door locks or anything else. I'm just not sure what to do about all this.
 
P

Paul - xxx

Guest
KakenBetaal vaguely muttered something like ...
> I have a standard flat garage with a swing-up door. I've mounted an
> Abus what'sit lock in the concrete floor to lock my bikes to, and I'm
> wondering what are good options for further securing the garage.
>
> I appreciate that if a thief gains access, he can close the door and
> work relatively undisturbed/unobserved, so I'm thinking about better
> door locks or anything else. I'm just not sure what to do about all
> this.


I used four window locks at each corner of the door, bolted to the door, and
fixed so that the door cannot be lifted, moved or opened without undoing all
four, as well as the 'normal' garage lock. The garage could also be locked
from outside too, by drilling a small 7mm diameter hole in line with the
window lock 'key'.

--
Paul ...
(8(|) Homer Rules !!!
"A ****** is a ******, no matter what mode of transport they're using."
 
P

Peter B

Guest
"KakenBetaal" <[email protected]> wrote in
message news:[email protected]
>
> I have a standard flat garage with a swing-up door. I've mounted an
> Abus what'sit lock in the concrete floor to lock my bikes to, and I'm
> wondering what are good options for further securing the garage.
>
> I appreciate that if a thief gains access, he can close the door and
> work relatively undisturbed/unobserved, so I'm thinking about better
> door locks or anything else. I'm just not sure what to do about all
> this.


I'd recomend you contact a locksmith
They'll know the best way of locking your particular door.
(sorry if this sounds facetious, that isn't my intent).

Pete
 
P

Peter B

Guest
"KakenBetaal" <[email protected]> wrote in
message news:[email protected]
>
> I have a standard flat garage with a swing-up door. I've mounted an
> Abus what'sit lock in the concrete floor to lock my bikes to, and I'm
> wondering what are good options for further securing the garage.
>
> I appreciate that if a thief gains access, he can close the door and
> work relatively undisturbed/unobserved, so I'm thinking about better
> door locks or anything else. I'm just not sure what to do about all
> this.


I'd recomend you contact a locksmith
They'll know the best way of locking your particular door.
(sorry if this sounds facetious, that isn't my intent).

Pete
 
D

David Martin

Guest
On 5/11/04 11:53 am, in article
[email protected], "KakenBetaal"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
> I have a standard flat garage with a swing-up door. I've mounted an
> Abus what'sit lock in the concrete floor to lock my bikes to, and I'm
> wondering what are good options for further securing the garage.
>
> I appreciate that if a thief gains access, he can close the door and
> work relatively undisturbed/unobserved, so I'm thinking about better
> door locks or anything else. I'm just not sure what to do about all
> this.
>


It depends on whether your garage has any other exit. Mine has a back door
so I have fitted big bolts to the main door on the inside. This means that
you cannot lock/unlock the door from the outside.

Obviously if you do not have a second entrance you cannot take this
approach.

...d
 
T

Tumbleweed

Guest
"KakenBetaal" <[email protected]> wrote in
message news:[email protected]
>
> I have a standard flat garage with a swing-up door. I've mounted an
> Abus what'sit lock in the concrete floor to lock my bikes to, and I'm
> wondering what are good options for further securing the garage.
>
> I appreciate that if a thief gains access, he can close the door and
> work relatively undisturbed/unobserved, so I'm thinking about better
> door locks or anything else. I'm just not sure what to do about all
> this.
>
>
> --
> KakenBetaal


I have got one of these;

http://www.saundersonsecurity.co.uk/itmidx42.shtml

--
Tumbleweed

email replies not necessary but to contact use;
tumbleweednews at hotmail dot com
 
A

Adam H

Guest
KakenBetaal wrote:
> I have a standard flat garage with a swing-up door. I've mounted an
> Abus what'sit lock in the concrete floor to lock my bikes to, and I'm
> wondering what are good options for further securing the garage.
>
> I appreciate that if a thief gains access, he can close the door and
> work relatively undisturbed/unobserved, so I'm thinking about better
> door locks or anything else. I'm just not sure what to do about all
> this.
>
>


What about something like this?

<url:http://www.autolok.co.uk/pages/stoppa.htm> Autolok Stoppa

I've got one installed and it looks like it would stop a casual thief.
However given that garage doors tend to be quite pliable most solutions
are not going to stop a determined thief.

Adam
 
T

Tumbleweed

Guest
"Mike Causer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:p[email protected]
> On Fri, 05 Nov 2004 17:51:59 +0000, Tumbleweed wrote:
>
>> I have got one of these;
>>
>> http://www.saundersonsecurity.co.uk/itmidx42.shtml

>
> Anything attached to the thin aluminium sheet can be circumvented by a
> tin-opener. Bolts securely attached to the frame of the door are the only
> way to do it.
>
>
> Mike


As Adam H pointed out, given that garage doors are relatively flimsy there
is only so much you can do (without putting a v expensive door in).
Presumably you could use the tin opener just to cut a whole in the door
anyway irrespective of bolts.?

--
Tumbleweed

email replies not necessary but to contact use;
tumbleweednews at hotmail dot com
 
M

Mike Causer

Guest
On Fri, 05 Nov 2004 18:24:28 +0000, Tumbleweed wrote:

> As Adam H pointed out, given that garage doors are relatively flimsy there
> is only so much you can do (without putting a v expensive door in).
> Presumably you could use the tin opener just to cut a whole in the door
> anyway irrespective of bolts.?


Cutting a hole large enough to get a body through is going to take a lot
longer than the 50mm hole needed to defeat the Autoloc device. In the
case of my garage, four holes big enough to get an arm into will defeat
the bolts, but this too will take some time, or cause a lot of noise if
power tools are used.

Mike
 
J

Jack Ouzzi

Guest
On Fri, 5 Nov 2004 22:53:42 +1100, KakenBetaal
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
>I have a standard flat garage with a swing-up door. I've mounted an
>Abus what'sit lock in the concrete floor to lock my bikes to, and I'm
>wondering what are good options for further securing the garage.
>
>I appreciate that if a thief gains access, he can close the door and
>work relatively undisturbed/unobserved, so I'm thinking about better
>door locks or anything else. I'm just not sure what to do about all
>this.


Put a large Doberman Pinscher that has not been fed for a week in the
garage :)
 
M

Michael MacClancy

Guest
On Fri, 5 Nov 2004 22:53:42 +1100, KakenBetaal wrote:

> I have a standard flat garage with a swing-up door. I've mounted an
> Abus what'sit lock in the concrete floor to lock my bikes to, and I'm
> wondering what are good options for further securing the garage.
>
> I appreciate that if a thief gains access, he can close the door and
> work relatively undisturbed/unobserved, so I'm thinking about better
> door locks or anything else. I'm just not sure what to do about all
> this.


My garage has an alarm system with IR and door sensors.
--
Michael MacClancy

www.macclancy.demon.co.uk
www.macclancy.co.uk
 
M

Morton Burner

Guest
In news:[email protected],
Paul - *** <[email protected]> wrote:
> KakenBetaal vaguely muttered something like ...
>> I have a standard flat garage with a swing-up door. I've mounted an
>> Abus what'sit lock in the concrete floor to lock my bikes to, and I'm
>> wondering what are good options for further securing the garage.
>>
>> I appreciate that if a thief gains access, he can close the door and
>> work relatively undisturbed/unobserved, so I'm thinking about better
>> door locks or anything else. I'm just not sure what to do about all
>> this.

>
> I used four window locks at each corner of the door, bolted to the
> door, and fixed so that the door cannot be lifted, moved or opened
> without undoing all four, as well as the 'normal' garage lock. The
> garage could also be locked from outside too, by drilling a small 7mm
> diameter hole in line with the window lock 'key'.



My up & ovr door spring is bust, so the guy that brakes in is gonna do his
back in lifting it, and get it coming down on the back of his head before he
spots the prop I use to keep it open. One of these days, I'll open the
garage from inside, and find a head rolling about.
--
Morton Burner
 
A

Al C-F

Guest
On Fri, 5 Nov 2004 22:53:42 +1100, KakenBetaal
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
>I have a standard flat garage with a swing-up door. I've mounted an
>Abus what'sit lock in the concrete floor to lock my bikes to, and I'm
>wondering what are good options for further securing the garage.
>

Automatic door?

Nothing on the outside to pick, and the door is held closed by a great
big lead screw and a motor.
 
C

Chris Malcolm

Guest
Mike Causer <[email protected]> writes:

>On Fri, 05 Nov 2004 18:24:28 +0000, Tumbleweed wrote:


>> As Adam H pointed out, given that garage doors are relatively flimsy there
>> is only so much you can do (without putting a v expensive door in).
>> Presumably you could use the tin opener just to cut a whole in the door
>> anyway irrespective of bolts.?


>Cutting a hole large enough to get a body through is going to take a lot
>longer than the 50mm hole needed to defeat the Autoloc device. In the
>case of my garage, four holes big enough to get an arm into will defeat
>the bolts, but this too will take some time, or cause a lot of noise if
>power tools are used.


When I lost my garage key, it took about five minutes investigation to
discover that about fifteen quiet minutes with a Swiss Tool (grown up
version of Swiss Army Knife) was all that was needed to take the
entire door off. Had to saw through a couple of bits of wood, but
didn't need to damage the door.

--
Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
 
M

Mike Causer

Guest
On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 11:25:21 +0000, Chris Malcolm wrote:


> When I lost my garage key, it took about five minutes investigation to
> discover that about fifteen quiet minutes with a Swiss Tool (grown up
> version of Swiss Army Knife) was all that was needed to take the
> entire door off. Had to saw through a couple of bits of wood, but
> didn't need to damage the door.


I hope you threw away those external hinges while the door was off and
fitted internal ones!


Mike
 
A

ARCred

Guest
Hi,

You can fasten a lockable bolt to the front bottom edge of the door and set a
steel pipe into the ground for the bolt. Take care to line up the pipe in
exactly the right place for the bolt.

I concreted a bar set in a heavy slotted pipe into the ground just in front of
the door. When the door is closed I can fasten one of those heavy duty
circular padlocks to the bar. The edge of the padlock is then about 2/3mm in
front the door, sticking up about 50mm it prevents the door being pulled
forward and opened even if the main lock is broken.

When you go away booby trap the door with some string tied to something (like
empty oil cans) that will be pulled off a high shelf and make a lot of noise.
Of course when you come home you will have forgotten !

Andrew.
 
S

ScumOfTheRoad

Guest
On Fri, 05 Nov 2004 22:53:42 +1100, KakenBetaal wrote:


> I appreciate that if a thief gains access, he can close the door and
> work relatively undisturbed/unobserved, so I'm thinking about better
> door locks or anything else. I'm just not sure what to do about all
> this.


I agree with the idea of setting a low post firmly into the ground,
using a padlock so you can remove it.
Somewhere I've seen these for sale - either Google or look through the
small ads in the Sunday papers.

I once had the same problem. Garage doors are just so easy to open.
Force the handle just a little and the door will open.
I looked at the runners which the 'up and over' door uses.
Drill a hole in the metal runner, and put a padlock in. The door may be
forced, but will only open a few inches.
Not as tough as the metal post solution above, which is better.
 
C

Chris Malcolm

Guest
Mike Causer <[email protected]> writes:

>On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 11:25:21 +0000, Chris Malcolm wrote:


>> When I lost my garage key, it took about five minutes investigation to
>> discover that about fifteen quiet minutes with a Swiss Tool (grown up
>> version of Swiss Army Knife) was all that was needed to take the
>> entire door off. Had to saw through a couple of bits of wood, but
>> didn't need to damage the door.


>I hope you threw away those external hinges while the door was off and
>fitted internal ones!


No external hinges, it was one of the those bendy slatted doors that
roll up into an overhead position, and that can quite easily by
tin-openered by anyone with a good strong knife.

But I just made it *look* nice and safe again, and sold it to a car
owner. Who as it happened in a moment of intoxication later totally
wrecked the door by driving into it.

It was somewhat otiose as a bike shed.



--
Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]