Securing bikes on a (car) rack



J

Jules

Guest
> Hmm...
>
> I've been pondering disks.


I wouldn't bother, to be honest, having ridden with them for 12 months now.

They don't offer any more usable braking power than well setup
cantilevers, the pads (comparatively) cost a fortune and need replacing
far more often, and the more torsionally rigid wheels required are heavier.

They're nice and bling, sure, but don't offer much.
 
D

Dave Hughes

Guest
On Fri, 08 Sep 2006 11:57:05 +0000, Jules wrote:

> They don't offer any more usable braking power than well setup
> cantilevers, the pads (comparatively) cost a fortune and need replacing
> far more often, and the more torsionally rigid wheels required are heavier.


They offer more reliable and better modulated braking. That's important
if you're braking as hard as you can, especially in adverse conditions.
99% of the time it doesn't matter, but I've come off due to brake failure
in the wet, and don't want to do it again. I also race mountain bikes, and
off road I'll take the brake that works with buckled rims any day.

Plus Deore pads work out to about 50% more expensive than V brake pads, if
that, and last a lot longer.

--
Dave Hughes | [email protected]
"I've found that nurturing one's Zen nature is vital to dealing with
technology. Violence is pretty damn useful too" - Lionel Lauer
 
J

Jules

Guest
> They offer more reliable and better modulated braking. That's important
> if you're braking as hard as you can, especially in adverse conditions.
> 99% of the time it doesn't matter, but I've come off due to brake failure
> in the wet, and don't want to do it again.


I disagree. In my experience they don't offer either of these things,
and I've never had brake failure of any sort, rain or otherwise.

It's funny, in the motorcycling world, "perimeter-style" brakes -
technology roughly akin to bicycle rim brakes - are all the rage in
125GP racing and even a couple of street bikes.

> I also race mountain bikes, and
> off road I'll take the brake that works with buckled rims any day.


I agree that this is their intended application, and if I were doing
this activity I certainly would opt for discs.

> Plus Deore pads work out to about 50% more expensive than V brake pads, if
> that, and last a lot longer.


Dunno where you buy your V brake shoes, but MTB ones seem to go for a
handful of dollars where I've looked! The pads I just ordered were
cheap at $25 for the set.

The shoes on my previous commuter MTB lasted 6 years. The pads on my
disc shod one have lasted 12 months.
 
D

Dave Hughes

Guest
On Fri, 08 Sep 2006 23:22:17 +0000, Jules wrote:

> I disagree. In my experience they don't offer either of these things,
> and I've never had brake failure of any sort, rain or otherwise.


Commuting on busy roads with occasional heavy rain. When you can see the
oil patterns on the 10cm deep water you know your brakes are about to do
interesting things. It doesn't happen often, but I've had that kind of
rain while commuting twice. First time my brakes took about 5 seconds to
come on on a steepish downhill (after scraping them about a minute
beforehand to ensure they were working). That resulted in a fairly low
speed OTB when they came on as I was trying to put the bike down without
hurting myself too much. Second time I had discs and just kept braking like
normal. I've had other times where the rim brakes had a noticeable lag
when being applied. Discs do that too, but the higher pressure removes
goop much quicker, so they clear themselves in ~2m (one revolution) rather
than 10.

> Dunno where you buy your V brake shoes, but MTB ones seem to go for a
> handful of dollars where I've looked! The pads I just ordered were
> cheap at $25 for the set.


A set of decent V brake pads costs around $12-15 most places I've seen. In
commuting use I'll kill a set in around 2500km at a guess (6 months of
solid commuting). I get at least that out of Deore pads racing off road,
and haven't worn out a set on road yet.My old style XT pads (~$50 a set)
are currently around 3 years old and still going strong.

And eBay or mail order can halve the price of pads, though that probably
applies to rim pads as well.

--
Dave Hughes | [email protected]
The trick to flying is to throw yourself at the ground and miss
- Douglas Adams