Security and convenience of cycle lights

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by D.M. Procida, Nov 9, 2004.

  1. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    My girfriend needs new lights on her bike. I want her to have some
    decent lights - something rechargable and very bright. She will moan an
    awful lot if I get her something that takes fifteen minutes to remove
    every time she goes into a shop, but at the same time expensive and
    easily-stolen lights won't be much use either.

    She tends to make short journeys into town, stopping at shops, the
    library, etc, not endless rides deep into the heart of nowhere.

    What would be the best sort of thing to go for?

    Daniele
    --
    Apple Juice Ltd
    Chapter Arts Centre
    Market Road www.apple-juice.co.uk
    Cardiff CF5 1QE 029 2019 0140
     
    Tags:


  2. On Tue, 9 Nov 2004 15:22:37 +0000, D.M. Procida
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My girfriend needs new lights on her bike. I want her to have some
    > decent lights - something rechargable and very bright. She will moan an
    > awful lot if I get her something that takes fifteen minutes to remove
    > every time she goes into a shop, but at the same time expensive and
    > easily-stolen lights won't be much use either.
    >
    > She tends to make short journeys into town, stopping at shops, the
    > library, etc, not endless rides deep into the heart of nowhere.
    >
    > What would be the best sort of thing to go for?


    Does her bike have a rack? If so (and if not fit one) then a good rear
    light could be one that screws onto the back of the rack. B&M do various
    "TopLights", Basta do one, there are probably others. This fixed LED
    battery (can be dynamo) light can then be supplemented by an (easy to)
    clip-in seatpost light---some of the Cat-Eye ones are good and bright.
    That's the back end done...

    Colin
     
  3. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    D.M. Procida wrote:
    > My girfriend needs new lights on her bike. I want her to have some
    > decent lights - something rechargable and very bright. She will moan an
    > awful lot if I get her something that takes fifteen minutes to remove
    > every time she goes into a shop, but at the same time expensive and
    > easily-stolen lights won't be much use either.
    >
    > She tends to make short journeys into town, stopping at shops, the
    > library, etc, not endless rides deep into the heart of nowhere.
    >
    > What would be the best sort of thing to go for?


    Dynamo hub with suitable light bolted to the bike. These lamps /can/ be
    removed, but it takes (a) a spanner, (b) some snips to cut the cabling
    and (c) thinking it's worth someone's while stealing. Being Deeply
    Unfashionable, this isn't too likely.

    The beauty of dynamos is they're always there so you can't forget your
    lights, have the batteries run out, forget to charge them etc. Bottle
    dynamos (the "normal" sort that run off a tyre) are fine but dynamo hubs
    are less fuss, more reliable and just plain better in use. The Schmidt
    SON is reckoned Best of Breed, but isn't cheap, while Shimano's models
    are quite a bit less and a good way towards being as good.

    Lamps powered from a dynamo aren't as bright as a Serious battery
    powered system, or at least not when the batteries are charged up, but
    they'll maintain their output indefinitely and are still reasonably
    bright in any case if you get decent lamps with halogen bulbs.

    I've just bought such a setup fro Roos' urban commute and hack bike,
    hopefully it'll have arrived now for the LBS to build a wheel around the
    hub...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    D.M. Procida wrote:
    > My girfriend needs new lights on her bike. I want her to have some
    > decent lights - something rechargable and very bright. She will moan
    > an awful lot if I get her something that takes fifteen minutes to
    > remove every time she goes into a shop, but at the same time
    > expensive and easily-stolen lights won't be much use either.
    >
    > She tends to make short journeys into town, stopping at shops, the
    > library, etc, not endless rides deep into the heart of nowhere.
    >
    > What would be the best sort of thing to go for?


    Dynamo lights would be ideal as they're bolted on.

    Alternatively, small clip-on LED lights would be adequate if your gf just
    needs lights to be seen by rather than to see -- these can be removed and
    fitted in seconds. They don't need to be rechargeable as the batteries
    last a long time (in the good ones).

    By the way, I know of a case where a theif stole a lockable Eurolight,
    despite having to break it, making it useless!

    ~PB
     
  5. Richard

    Richard Guest

    D.M. Procida wrote:
    > My girfriend needs new lights on her bike. I want her to have some
    > decent lights - something rechargable and very bright. She will moan an
    > awful lot if I get her something that takes fifteen minutes to remove
    > every time she goes into a shop, but at the same time expensive and
    > easily-stolen lights won't be much use either.
    >
    > She tends to make short journeys into town, stopping at shops, the
    > library, etc, not endless rides deep into the heart of nowhere.


    I have a Cateye EL-300 at the front (which is a bit of a beast to carry
    in street clothes, but easy to unclip) and a Cateye AU-100 at the back
    (small and discreet and easy to unclip). I find no problem in
    unclipping them and taking them with me. Not rechargeable (unless you
    get rechargeable AA batteries), but both plenty bright enough to be seen.
     
  6. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    D.M. Procida <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My girfriend needs new lights on her bike.


    > What would be the best sort of thing to go for?


    Argh! Madness! Madness! Just one online supplier (Wiggle) has my head
    spinning with the unbelievably vast array of products. I don't dare go
    looking elsewhere.

    If you'd asked me 20 minutes agao I'd have guessed that at around £50
    (which is about what I'd like to spend, and I'll probably get the same
    set of lights for myself too) there would be just a small handful of
    things to choose from. Evidently not...

    Daniele
    --
    Apple Juice Ltd
    Chapter Arts Centre
    Market Road www.apple-juice.co.uk
    Cardiff CF5 1QE 029 2019 0140
     
  7. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message
    <1gmzp70.1micd3gsh2dh7N%[email protected]>,
    D.M. Procida ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > My girfriend needs new lights on her bike. I want her to have some
    > decent lights - something rechargable and very bright. She will moan
    > an awful lot if I get her something that takes fifteen minutes to
    > remove every time she goes into a shop, but at the same time expensive
    > and easily-stolen lights won't be much use either.


    A hub dynamo. No need to remember to recharge, pretty bright, very hard
    to steal.

    Alternatively, a bar bag with a lamp bracket on the bottom (Carradice
    Super C certainly used to have one, and I believe one or two others do,
    too), and use a rechargeable light pack with the lights on the bracket
    and the battery in the bar-bag. Then the whole lot can be removed from
    the bike in one neat package with one click of the KlickFix button.


    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    "This young man has not the faintest idea how socialists think and does
    not begin to understand the mentality of the party he has been elected
    to lead. He is quite simply a liberal"
    -- Ken Coates MEP (Lab) of Tony Blair
     
  8. >I have a Cateye EL-300 at the front (which is a bit of a beast to carry
    >in street clothes, but easy to unclip) and a Cateye AU-100 at the back
    >(small and discreet and easy to unclip). I find no problem in
    >unclipping them and taking them with me. Not rechargeable (unless you
    >get rechargeable AA batteries), but both plenty bright enough to be seen.


    On the plus side - the run time of the EL-300 is so long, battery
    replacement/cost is not a major issue - well, not to me ;-) I use two of the
    things and am happy with the level of illumination provided. Easy to attach &
    detach from the bike. Being a girlie, any bags I carry are decended from the
    Tardis, so have vast amounts of internal space no matter what the external
    dimensions ;-)

    Plus, they are only £26.39 post free from Cycle Express. Even cheaper than
    Wiggle on this occasion. See

    http://www.cyclexpress.co.uk/products/Cateye_HLEL_300_570.asp

    Mind you, if I were buying detachable and bright front lights from scratch
    *now*, I'd go for a couple of the S-Sun LED lights - the type Nathan has one of
    as part of his front lighting system. Small, very, very bright and very, very
    light. £19.99 each from St John Street Cycles online or probably also a LBS
    near you. Again, a long run time so battery cost less of a consideration I
    feel.

    Cheers, helen s

    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam--
    to get correct one remove fame & fortune
    h*$el*$$e*nd**$o$ts**i*$*$m*m$o*n*[email protected]$*a$o*l.c**$om$

    --Due to financial crisis the light at the end of the tunnel is switched off--
     
  9. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 9/11/04 4:05 pm, in article
    [email protected], "Simon Brooke"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > in message
    > <1gmzp70.1micd3gsh2dh7N%[email protected]>,
    > D.M. Procida ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> My girfriend needs new lights on her bike. I want her to have some
    >> decent lights - something rechargable and very bright. She will moan
    >> an awful lot if I get her something that takes fifteen minutes to
    >> remove every time she goes into a shop, but at the same time expensive
    >> and easily-stolen lights won't be much use either.

    >
    > A hub dynamo. No need to remember to recharge, pretty bright, very hard
    > to steal.


    Are there any hub dynamos with a hub brake? I'm tempted for the roadster and
    it currently has a drum brake (not that it works particularly well mind
    you).

    ...d
     
  10. oznation

    oznation New Member

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  11. Paul Rudin

    Paul Rudin Guest

    [email protected] (D.M. Procida) writes:

    > My girfriend needs new lights on her bike. I want her to have some
    > decent lights - something rechargable and very bright. She will moan an
    > awful lot if I get her something that takes fifteen minutes to remove
    > every time she goes into a shop, but at the same time expensive and
    > easily-stolen lights won't be much use either.
    >
    > She tends to make short journeys into town, stopping at shops, the
    > library, etc, not endless rides deep into the heart of nowhere.
    >
    > What would be the best sort of thing to go for?


    A good hub dynamo (e.g. SON) + suitable lamps that stay on the bike.
     
  12. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Alternatively, a bar bag with a lamp bracket on the bottom (Carradice
    > Super C certainly used to have one, and I believe one or two others do,
    > too), and use a rechargeable light pack with the lights on the bracket
    > and the battery in the bar-bag. Then the whole lot can be removed from
    > the bike in one neat package with one click of the KlickFix button.


    Don't you have to undo both light and battery, and wind up all the
    cables, with such an arrangement?

    Daniele
    --
    Apple Juice Ltd
    Chapter Arts Centre
    Market Road www.apple-juice.co.uk
    Cardiff CF5 1QE 029 2019 0140
     
  13. In article <BDB69CC0.2014%[email protected]>, David Martin wrote:
    >
    >Are there any hub dynamos with a hub brake? I'm tempted for the roadster and
    >it currently has a drum brake (not that it works particularly well mind
    >you).


    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360014567
    Shimano DH-3R40 Dynamo Hub, "Includes roller brake mount", perhaps?
     
  14. chris French

    chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Alan Braggins
    <[email protected]> writes
    >In article <BDB69CC0.2014%[email protected]>, David Martin wrote:
    >>
    >>Are there any hub dynamos with a hub brake? I'm tempted for the roadster and
    >>it currently has a drum brake (not that it works particularly well mind
    >>you).

    >
    >http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360014567
    >Shimano DH-3R40 Dynamo Hub, "Includes roller brake mount", perhaps?


    Roller brakes are ok, but no where near as good as my Sachs drum brake,
    I certainly wouldn't want to swop mine for one (BTW Martin, I find my
    drum brake works well)

    If I was to go this route I'd look at disk brake instead.
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  15. NC

    NC Guest

    D.M. Procida wrote:
    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Alternatively, a bar bag with a lamp bracket on the bottom (Carradice
    >> Super C certainly used to have one, and I believe one or two others
    >> do, too), and use a rechargeable light pack with the lights on the
    >> bracket and the battery in the bar-bag. Then the whole lot can be
    >> removed from the bike in one neat package with one click of the
    >> KlickFix button.

    >
    > Don't you have to undo both light and battery, and wind up all the
    > cables, with such an arrangement?


    No, a misunderstanding:
    Detachable handlebar bag. Lamp attached to bag. Battery in bag. Unclip bag
    and take lamps and batteries with you.


    However, on the original question I think its a choice between LED lamps and
    a Dynamo system

    Bright LED battery lamps, such as Cateye models mentioned in the thread, and
    LED tail lamps. These are simple, easy to detach, easy to fit. But need
    batteries fairly regularly, though not as quickly as the bulb models (or a
    charger and rechargable batteries). Expect to be spending around £30 for a
    front and £12 - £16 for the rear.
    There is an argument for two lamps on the back, one constant red to the
    British Standard and one flashing red.

    Dynamo systems:
    SON hub is superb, but realistically £150 to £200 for a system once wheel is
    built around the SON hub and lamps bought.

    A side-wall dynamo of decent quality (eg. B&M) is around £35.
    Lamp to suit the sidewall dynamo from about £15 each end, or £25 rear £35
    front if you want the types which stay illuminated when stationary
    (Standlights).


    For the use you've described, I'd suggest a side-wall B&M dynamo, plus a
    standlight headlamp and standlight tail-lamp. Its not too expensive, stays
    bolted to the bike, works as soon as its turned on without battery hassle.
    Will take a bit of time to fit, but once fitted its minimal hassle. The
    luxury version is to have a hub dynamo, which one could always add later.

    Website with the B&M dynamo range reasonably presented so you can see what
    is what is Kinetics:
    http://kinetics.org.uk/html/b_m_dynamos.shtml


    - Nigel
     
  16. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message
    <1gmzryn.unidl5123wd9bN%[email protected]>,
    D.M. Procida ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Alternatively, a bar bag with a lamp bracket on the bottom (Carradice
    >> Super C certainly used to have one, and I believe one or two others
    >> do, too), and use a rechargeable light pack with the lights on the
    >> bracket and the battery in the bar-bag. Then the whole lot can be
    >> removed from the bike in one neat package with one click of the
    >> KlickFix button.

    >
    > Don't you have to undo both light and battery, and wind up all the
    > cables, with such an arrangement?


    No, that's the beauty of it. The lights are attached to the bottom of
    the bag, the battery is inside the bag; the cable sticks out under the
    lid of the bag and goes down to the battery. Unclip and remove the bag
    (which you would do anyway because it's got your purse, etc, in it) and
    you've also removed the lights. And these days it's a one click job to
    remove the bag.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    [ This mind intentionally left blank ]
     
  17. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    NC wrote:

    > Dynamo systems:
    > SON hub is superb, but realistically £150 to £200 for a system oncewheel is
    > built around the SON hub and lamps bought.


    This is true, but OTOH the Shimano dynahubs (there's the Nexus and the
    new Ultegra and XT models) are quite a lot cheaper and a good way to
    being as good.

    > A side-wall dynamo of decent quality (eg. B&M) is around £35.


    <snip>

    > For the use you've described, I'd suggest a side-wall B&M dynamo, plus a
    > standlight headlamp and standlight tail-lamp.


    I'd go for a Shimano hub plus standlights. In fact that's what I have
    just ordered for exactly the same job for Roos' hack bike.

    > Website with the B&M dynamo range reasonably presented so you can see what
    > is what is Kinetics:
    > http://kinetics.org.uk/html/b_m_dynamos.shtml


    And Ben has the Shimano hubs in stock too. This will still be quite a
    bit more than a bottle dynamo (don't forget to factor in a new wheel
    build too), but IMHO worth the extra. I run a bottle dynamo on the
    freight bike (single sided wheel supports and drum brakes means no
    dynohub) and they're far fiddlier in use.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  18. On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 15:31:04 +0000, Peter Clinch
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Dynamo hub with suitable light bolted to the bike.


    Absolutely. This is a perfect application for the Nexus hub dynamo.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  19. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

    > Absolutely. This is a perfect application for the Nexus hub dynamo.


    Though the new Ultegra is only an extra tenner or so and Ben reckons
    better. Must check and see if the new one's arrived at home yet, and if
    not ask him where it's got to...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>, Peter Clinch wrote:
    >NC wrote:
    >
    >> Dynamo systems:
    >> SON hub is superb, but realistically £150 to £200 for a system once wheel is
    >> built around the SON hub and lamps bought.

    >
    >This is true, but OTOH the Shimano dynahubs (there's the Nexus and the
    >new Ultegra and XT models) are quite a lot cheaper and a good way to
    >being as good.
    >
    >> A side-wall dynamo of decent quality (eg. B&M) is around £35.


    And possibly more comparable to the Shimano dynahubs than the SON.
    If you compare the SON with top of the line side-wall dynamos, the
    B&M S6 is £110, the S12 with lights £300.

    My NiCds are showing their age, and didn't last the whole of my commute
    on Monday. The bike (which is quite a lot newer than the NiCds) came with
    a cheap Union dynamo that won't align properly without filing the mount
    and some single strand damp string that broke, but I'm dithering between
    fixing that, buying a better dynamo system, and buying some new batteries
    (and maybe a better charger, and maybe an LVR, and definitely fixing the
    dodgy contacts inside the light case unless I buy an entire new system).


    >And Ben has the Shimano hubs in stock too. This will still be quite a
    >bit more than a bottle dynamo (don't forget to factor in a new wheel
    >build too), but IMHO worth the extra.


    My current plan is to see how well the existing bottle works, but probably
    get a Shimano hub and rebuild the wheel myself if I buy a new dynamo system.

    There seem to be a surprising number of different Shimano hubs stocked by
    different people, with statements like "x% more efficient than the older ones"
    not always making it clear exactly which older ones are being compared....
     
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