Seeking advice for first mtb



Regarding suspension forks: will a suspension fork with non-functional suspension function similarly to a traditional fork?
 
2016 Felt DD70 Fat Bike must go. Moving out of state and need to sell fast. Not ridden very often. Bike is in great condition and rides like a Cadillac.

All parts are original spec except the brake rotors have been upgrade to Shimano XT and the grips have been upgraded to Odi Van's grips.

Size is a medium, 18.5. Will fit most people.

Bike comes with Diety pedals, rack, trunk bag, mud guards, Garmin mount, and a bell

This is outside my budget ($500) but if i can talk the seller down and it fits I may break the bank
 

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2016 Felt DD70 Fat Bike must go. Moving out of state and need to sell fast. Not ridden very often. Bike is in great condition and rides like a Cadillac.

All parts are original spec except the brake rotors have been upgrade to Shimano XT and the grips have been upgraded to Odi Van's grips.

Size is a medium, 18.5. Will fit most people.

Bike comes with Diety pedals, rack, trunk bag, mud guards, Garmin mount, and a bell

This is outside my budget ($500) but if i can talk the seller down and it fits I may break the bank
IMO ...

Now, we're talkikn' ...

Other than what appear to be 700-58 tires, THAT (a suspensionless 29er) is really the type of bike which you would possibly end up with in a year-or-two based on the type of non-paved riding you indicated ...

The tires-and-tubes can be changed to 700-53 (or, smaller) if the 700-58 are fatter than your riding needs require ...

Clip-on DROP bars are available for $20-to-$30 depending on where you source them ...​

Personallly, I would offer her $450 BUT I would be very willing to pay the asking $500 ... offering a little less but being willing to pay her asking price will make the seller feel 'okay' about parting with the bike for so little.

 
*sigh*

Someone beat me to it...

Found this: Selling my 2015 diamondback scapegoat. Great bike. Built as an all mountain. Everything on this bike is aftermarket. Race face bottom kronolog dropper post. Hayes hydraulic brakes. Fox 36 front rp23 rear. lots of travel. Well risen Well maintained Over $2000 into the bike. Must go asap


He wants $750.. If I can get him under $600 I'll buy it. .


Unless there's a reason I shouldn't.. If so let me know as I'm going to check out the bike in a few hours
 

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MSRP of this bike was 6K (for an aluminum frame?) woah...

According to Diamondback its their freeride/park-oriented model. My plans are geared towards XC style riding. How can I tweak the bike (other than the aforementioned drop bars) to make it more suitable for that discipline?
 
MSRP of this bike was 6K (for an aluminum frame?) woah...

According to Diamondback its their freeride/park-oriented model. My plans are geared towards XC style riding. How can I tweak the bike (other than the aforementioned drop bars) to make it more suitable for that discipline?
Wow!

That's a lot of bike for the type of riding you think you will be doing ...​

If you know alpine skiing classifications, a "freeride" bike's geometry is better suited for steeper BLACK DIAMOND slopes ...

The headtube angle will be a little slacker & the BB height will be a little higher AND the Fork will have more travel than on a "regular" MTB ...
AFTER you either change the handlebars or add clip-on DROP bars, you'll probably want to change to a much longer stem ...

You may want to eventually change the front chainring to a 38t-or-42t-or-44t-or-46t chainring at some point ...

Eventually, choose the Cassette's range based on how steep the paths are that you ride over... I would consider an 11-42 Cassette with any of the larger chainrings.​

Initiially, I would probably lock-out the rear suspension + minimize the Fork's travel ...

Increase the travel on a trial-and-error basis for the types of trails you end up riding on AND the speed at which you are traversing those trails/surfaces ...​

If you eventually decide to use ROAD levers, then remember that the Tektro/TRP SPYRE caliper is designed for a Road brake lever's cable pull rate. They used to be about $80, each. I don't know what they cost, now, OR if there is a new-and-improved version OR if there is something better from another manufacturer ...

I vaguely recall that Shimano has a disc brake caliper which can be used with a Road brake lever, but it only has the standard, asymmetric "single piston" (or, whatever it's called) action which is the limitation on most cable actuated bicycle disc brake calipers ... the Spyre caliper has a "double piston" mechanism which means that the pads converge on the rotor symmetrically.​

The tires which are currently on the bike are probably much more robust (and consequently, heavier!) than will be best suited for the trails you plan to ride on ...

Consult your local LBS or riders you encounter where you will be riding for the preferred tire treads & widths for particular trails ...

LATEX tubes weigh a lot less than butyl rubber tubes ... and, they may be worth considering at some point.


 
Close-ups
 

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Alfeng, would these specifications work for a stem?

  • WEIGHT: 178g
  • MATERIAL: Forged alloy
  • RISE: 7°
  • STEERER DIAMETER: 1 1/8" or 1" using the included shim
  • CLAMP DIAMETER: 25.4mm
  • CLAMP HEIGHT: 47mm
  • LENGTHS: 90mm, 105mm, 120mm, 135mm
 
Alfeng, would these specifications work for a stem?

  • WEIGHT: 178g
  • MATERIAL: Forged alloy
  • RISE: 7°
  • STEERER DIAMETER: 1 1/8" or 1" using the included shim
  • CLAMP DIAMETER: 25.4mm
  • CLAMP HEIGHT: 47mm
  • LENGTHS: 90mm, 105mm, 120mm, 135mm
NO ...

For many reasons ...

IMO (without seeing how your Road bike is set up), due to the elevated position of the current stem you will probably want a stem which is close to horizontal when installed ...

Regardless of the type of handlebars you choose to use now-or-in-the-future, you will want a stem whose clamp accommodates an OS (31.8mm / 1.25") center section ... that's become the "standard" size for most handlebar center sections for the past several years.

Not that you asked, but if I had to guess at a length, initially it would be one which resulted in ABOUT 1" less reach to the Drops than on your Road bike ... but, maybe the same, maybe shorter.​

Use how your Road is set up as the starting point for how you set up your new bike.

 
Froze, thank you, and your advice throughout the buying process was much appreciated.

Alfeng, do you still subscribe to the belief that bike owners can perform their own maintenance & repairs pertaining to MTBs? They seem decidedly more complex than road bikes.


I spoke to a friend who's a mechanic and received this advice:


Some tips:
-check torque on all suspension bolts
-setup air and sag on suspension
-make sure headset is tight
-make sure bottom bracket is tight
-make sure pedals are tight
-make sure brakes work
-make sure wheels are true/ spoke tension is even
-if you have a dropper seatpost, make sure it’s functioning properly and the saddle doesn’t have more than 3 degrees of side to side play

Oh and as far as suspension goes, as long as you don’t have excess fluid coming out and the lockout/ firm setting works on it, then it should be good. In order to truly know this, you’ll need to setup the air in both the front and rear suspension. Basically your weight will determine the amount of psi that needs to be pumped into the suspension. Some of them have charts on them already, some of the charts need to be looked up online

Now if wanna get a tune up done those will start around $100

That’s to make:
-shifting work
-brakes work (unless they need bleeding)
-wheels true
-headset adj
-bb adj
-hubs adj

Front and rear suspension work varies and is usually not included in any tuneups

Front and rear suspension each ranges from: $50-$140


Worse case scenario is you need a tune up w/ suspension work done and brake bleeeds which could range from $350-$500 in all.
 
Froze, thank you, and your advice throughout the buying process was much appreciated.

Alfeng, do you still subscribe to the belief that bike owners can perform their own maintenance & repairs pertaining to MTBs? They seem decidedly more complex than road bikes.


I spoke to a friend who's a mechanic and received this advice:


Some tips:
-check torque on all suspension bolts
-setup air and sag on suspension

-make sure headset is tight
-make sure bottom bracket is tight
-make sure pedals are tight
-make sure brakes work
-make sure wheels are true/ spoke tension is even

-if you have a dropper seatpost, make sure it’s functioning properly and the saddle doesn’t have more than 3 degrees of side to side play

Oh and as far as suspension goes, as long as you don’t have excess fluid coming out and the lockout/ firm setting works on it, then it should be good. In order to truly know this, you’ll need to setup the air in both the front and rear suspension. Basically your weight will determine the amount of psi that needs to be pumped into the suspension. Some of them have charts on them already, some of the charts need to be looked up online

Now if wanna get a tune up done those will start around $100

That’s to make:
-shifting work
-brakes work (unless they need bleeding)
-wheels true
-headset adj
-bb adj
-hubs adj

Front and rear suspension work varies and is usually not included in any tuneups

Front and rear suspension each ranges from: $50-$140


Worse case scenario is you need a tune up w/ suspension work done and brake bleeeds which could range from $350-$500 in all.
FWIW ...

If you look at the list which your friend provided, the only things which are different are the rear suspension components & Suspension Fork (I'm not counting a Dropper seatpost since it isn't a factor for the type of riding you are currently planning) ...

And so, the core of his check list are things which should be done with a Road bike before each ride ... which the average individual should be attending to, themselves ...

Having a torque wrench will be very beneficial for maintaining the connecting bolts on the rear suspension's swing arm & shock.​

As I was generally true a dozen years ago, I am sure that you currently need to consult the Fork manufacturer's website for a PDF-or-online-pages for the maintenance or rebuilds of almost every Fork ...
KNOW YOUR LIMITATIONS ...

The bottom line is that YOU can continue to do most of the maintenance & adjustments on a MTB if they were maintenance & adjustments you were comfortable doing on your Road bike(s) ...

The stuff you may not have tools for you should have a shop do OR have your friend "help" you with.
BTW. Regarding Hydraulic Brakes ... they're great if you are riding in sub-zero temps ...

Since I know that I will probably never again be inclined to subject myself to sub-zero temps on voluntary basis, I would probably consider parting-out those Hayes brakes & installing a pair of the SPYRE mechanical calipers which I mentioned before ALONG with the Drop handlebars & Road brake levers sooner-rather-than-later ...

While you did get a lot of bike for a comparatively modest amount of money ...

I did try to indicate that:

"(a suspensionless 29er) is really the type of bike which you would possibly end up with in a year-or-two based on the type of non-paved riding you indicated ... "

Often times, "less is more."


 
I have an agreement to buy this Kona Jake tomorrow for $175. Planning to use it for town & light trails where it will have a speed advantage over the MTB

My beloved Kona Jake is up for sale. An injury from last year has left me paralyzed, and therefore my days of two Wheeling have ended. Help me raise some money for my hand tricycle by taking this great Commuter or road bike off my hands. Carbon fiber Fork, Shimano parts, quick shifters on drop-down handles. Was left covered but outside this past winter and therefore chain and sprocket need some love.
 

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LOOKS GOOD ...

I think that 700-42 "Hybrid" tires should fit without any problem ... but, maybe not ... that size will let you run on most unpaved "fire" or gravel roads without too much trouble ...

You might be able to squeeze a 700-48 (once a comparatively rare size which may no longer be available OR it may be extremely common!, now!?!) "29er" tires in the Fork ... the side knobs may be the problem rather than the underlying tire carcass ... the space above the rear tire looks comparatively limited; but, it's a CX bike frame, so you will just have to see what size tire does-and-doesn't fit.

 
There is very little on a modern bike that should be tightened without first knowing the correct torque specs and using a torque wrench, so get a torque wrench with bits. Park makes preset (ATD series) drivers which are the most accurate but you have to buy all 3, I think there are 3, to get the set; also Park makes an adjustable one called the ATD Adjustable Torque Drive that looks just like the preset ones which is also very accurate. These small ones are limited to about 3 to 6 newton meters, if you want a torque wrench with more range to do all things on a bike then again Park has the best one called the Wrench TW5, which is the same wrench as the PRO (also Shimano PRO) and Pedros just different paint, so you could shop the best price and get that one and have the same wrench; these are all rated 2 to 14 Nm so you can see the range is indeed greater then the smaller ones but with that greater range comes a little bit less accuracy but you can have the wrench tested for accuracy at any LBS, if not them a mechanic shop can do it and hopefully not charge you. The odd thing is that Park and Pro offer a one year warranty, but Pedro and Shimano goes for 2 years, not sure why.

There are real expensive fancy Italian made ones, but they aren't any more accurate than the ones I listed, in fact a few of them are less accurate.

IMPORTANT, concerning adjustable torque wrench's, after EACH use you must dial down the torque setting to it's lowest point BEFORE storing it, failure to do so will throw the accuracy off.
 
Woah, this bike was a steal. 9-speed Ultegra RD, Ultegra crankset, 105 shifters, Bontracer carbon stem, Gatorskin tires. Since I'm using the bike for off-road I'll swap the Gators out
 
I will need a Cyclocross crankset for my bike. What BB is a 18 year-old bike currently equipped with a 9-speed Ultegra crankset likely to accommodate?
 

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