Seeking advice on custom frames in Boston area

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Dave Stallard, Jun 30, 2003.

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  1. I'm getting a little tired of my current 9 year old road bike, and am looking to move up.
    Specifically, I'm interested in getting a custom frame, probably steel, but I will consider other
    materials ;), except aluminum, which I'm sick of.

    I'm in the Boston area. Possible sources I've investigated so far are the Bikeway Source, which does
    business with Marinoni, and Belmont Wheelworks, which has Serotta, Seven, and Peter Mooney frames.
    Merlin used to be here in town quite close to where I work, but they've moved away, apparently.

    I'd probably load this with Dura-Ace or Record. The whole thing I'd like to cost not too much more
    than $5K. Does anybody have any advice to give me on any of these frames or dealers, or on getting a
    custom frame generally?

    Dave
     
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  2. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Dave Stallard" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm getting a little tired of my current 9 year old road bike, and am looking to move up.
    > Specifically, I'm interested in getting a custom frame, probably steel, but I will consider other
    > materials ;), except aluminum, which I'm sick of.
    >
    > I'm in the Boston area. Possible sources I've investigated so far are the Bikeway Source, which
    > does business with Marinoni, and Belmont Wheelworks, which has Serotta, Seven, and Peter Mooney
    > frames. Merlin used to be here in town quite close to where I work, but they've moved away,
    > apparently.
    >
    > I'd probably load this with Dura-Ace or Record. The whole thing I'd like to cost not too much more
    > than $5K. Does anybody have any advice to give me on any of these frames or dealers, or on getting
    > a custom frame generally?

    Most of the guys buying mid-life bikes go Ti, Seven seems to be the favorite. You'll have no trouble
    getting to 5K.
     
  3. On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 21:15:18 +0000, Dave Stallard wrote:

    > I'm getting a little tired of my current 9 year old road bike, and am looking to move up.
    > Specifically, I'm interested in getting a custom frame, probably steel, but I will consider other
    > materials ;), except aluminum, which I'm sick of.
    >
    > I'm in the Boston area.

    If you are in the Boston area and want a custom frame, why not check out Independent Fabrications?
    Lots of my friends ride their bikes and like them.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Arguing with an engineer is like mud wrestling with a pig... You _`\(,_ | soon find out the
    pig likes it! (_)/ (_) |
     
  4. Dave,

    Just a question, due to the fact that I am looking for a new lightweight frame. All of mine are
    currently steel and I thought aluminum would be better.....Why are you sick of aluminum?

    TIA, Ernie

    Dave Stallard wrote:

    > I'm getting a little tired of my current 9 year old road bike, and am looking to move up.
    > Specifically, I'm interested in getting a custom frame, probably steel, but I will consider other
    > materials ;), except aluminum, which I'm sick of.
    >
    > I'm in the Boston area. Possible sources I've investigated so far are the Bikeway Source, which
    > does business with Marinoni, and Belmont Wheelworks, which has Serotta, Seven, and Peter Mooney
    > frames. Merlin used to be here in town quite close to where I work, but they've moved away,
    > apparently.
    >
    > I'd probably load this with Dura-Ace or Record. The whole thing I'd like to cost not too much more
    > than $5K. Does anybody have any advice to give me on any of these frames or dealers, or on getting
    > a custom frame generally?
    >
    > Dave
     
  5. E & V Willson wrote:
    >
    > Dave,
    >
    > Just a question, due to the fact that I am looking for a new lightweight frame. All of mine are
    > currently steel and I thought aluminum would be better.....Why are you sick of aluminum?

    The ride is just too harsh for me, esp. on the crappy roads we have here. I'm currently on a Trek
    1220, which is a nice-enough bike and super light, but I'd like something that soaked up the bumps a
    little more. Tastes differ, though. Plenty of people ride aluminum bikes and like them.

    Dave
     
  6. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    Mayhem <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 20:41:39 -0700, "Just a Cyclist" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> In article <[email protected]>, "Just a Cyclist" <[email protected]> writes:
    > >> >
    > >> > So blocking a street so I can't walk across it is not stomping on my rights?? Pure BS
    > >>
    > >> So how come cars get away with it all the time, but a few minutes per month of bikes doing it,
    > >> and some ppl gotta run around with their hair on fire about it?
    > >
    > >Good we are changing the subject........yes they are violating my right to cross the street! It
    > >is a right!
    >
    > Oh really? I was under the impression that as public roads, the right you have to acces that
    > public road is a legislated privilege not a RIGHT.

    What part of "right of way" do you not understand? Leagally, a Public Road is either a "public way"
    (the public has the right to use it, and the government the responsibility to maintian it) or a
    "right of way" (the public has the right to use it, but is not required to maintain
    it). The public includes pedestrians, bicycles, horses, oxen, horse-drawn carriages, farm equipment,
    tractors, mopeds...

    I think you are confusing this with "private right-of-way" where a specific agreement, history of
    usage, or ruling gives a specific individual or group a right to use specific land for passage. a
    private right-of-way is _not_ a public road or public way.

    > You do not have a RIGHT to walk across a road anymore than you have the RIGHT to enter my front
    > door. I will afford you the privilege but not the right, likewise with yourself crossing a road; a
    > PUBLIC road.

    What country are you in? Were you aware that in the United States, the pedestrian sidewalk is part
    of the highway?

    Public right-of-way rules have been in existence for centuries, long before the advent of the
    automobile. No priviledge had to be granted to use the roads, and no one could tell you you could
    not use the roads...not even the courts. (That sounds to me like a right, not a priviledge.)

    When automobiles started appearing, it was quickly recognized that they posed a much greater hazard
    to other road users. I may be mistaken, but I believe it was Henry Ford himself who was involved in
    the first major automobile accident. After that, he began advocating licensure of motor vehcile
    operators. Doing so recognized that motor vehicle operators do not have a _right_ to operate on the
    roads. The license was a form of priviledge granted to an individual to operate a motor vehicle on
    the road. It granted restricted "rights" but because it could be revoked it was still legally a
    priveledge. IIRC, Henery Ford was granted the first license to operate motor vehicles in the US.

    At no point (before or since) has the public's right to use the roads been repealed, revoked, or
    even significantly altered. These road-use-by-right users include pedestrians, bicycles, horses
    (and other beasts of burden), horse-drawn carriages, tractors and other farm equipment, and mopeds,
    among others.

    There are some very limited exceptions, and they must be posted. They are almost always "limited
    access divided highways" (and in some places, even limited access divided highways allow bicycles).
    The next time you enter one with your car, note the sign. It says something like "Pedestrians,
    bicycles, horses, horse-drawn carriages, tractors and other farm equipment, and mopeds prohibited".
    Why the sign? Because everyone (the legislature, the courts, law enforcement officers, and the
    public) assume that you have the right to use the road unless otherwise posted. The _right_ to use
    the road, not priveledge.

    Austin
     
  7. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    Dave Stallard <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > E & V Willson wrote:
    > >
    > > Dave,
    > >
    > > Just a question, due to the fact that I am looking for a new lightweight frame. All of mine are
    > > currently steel and I thought aluminum would be better.....Why are you sick of aluminum?
    >
    > The ride is just too harsh for me, esp. on the crappy roads we have here. I'm currently on a Trek
    > 1220, which is a nice-enough bike and super light, but I'd like something that soaked up the bumps
    > a little more. Tastes differ, though. Plenty of people ride aluminum bikes and like them.
    >
    Have you tried using *wider* tires like 700x25 or even 700x28? Wider tires need lower air pressure
    (100-110psi) which results in more air volume and more comfort. Further, wider tires arguably have
    LOWER rolling resistance and put more tire on the road, thus providing better handling. Its the
    *cheapest* upgrade, so try it. Of course, if you just want a new bike, nobody's faulting you for
    that, so do it. As previously mentioned, you seem to have alot of good local builders in your area.
    If you want carbon, take a look at Parlee (www.parleecycles.com). I believe they're in your area and
    although expensive, they arguably make one of the best carbon bikes around....
     
  8. Mortdubois

    Mortdubois Guest

    Dave Stallard <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > E & V Willson wrote:
    > >
    > > Dave,
    > >
    > > Just a question, due to the fact that I am looking for a new lightweight frame. All of mine are
    > > currently steel and I thought aluminum would be better.....Why are you sick of aluminum?
    >
    > The ride is just too harsh for me, esp. on the crappy roads we have here. I'm currently on a Trek
    > 1220, which is a nice-enough bike and super light, but I'd like something that soaked up the bumps
    > a little more. Tastes differ, though. Plenty of people ride aluminum bikes and like them.
    >
    > Dave

    A few years ago I was sick of my bike, too, and uncomfortable on it. Then I got a recumbent - still
    very fast, way more comfortable. Not for the meek, though.

    Mort
     
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