Seeking advices about electric bike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Xiaoshen Li, Jan 12, 2005.

  1. Xiaoshen Li

    Xiaoshen Li Guest

    Hi,

    I want to buy an electric bike for commuting to work every day, ~ 4
    miles one way.
    I saw Pepboys Auto is selling APC Electric Cruiser Bike for $249. I am
    wondering if anybody has experiences/opinions about it.

    Thank you very much.
     
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  2. dgk

    dgk Guest

    On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 09:22:09 -0500, Xiaoshen Li <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >I want to buy an electric bike for commuting to work every day, ~ 4
    >miles one way.
    >I saw Pepboys Auto is selling APC Electric Cruiser Bike for $249. I am
    >wondering if anybody has experiences/opinions about it.
    >
    >Thank you very much.


    Why not use a real one and get some exercise out of the deal?
     
  3. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    dgk wrote:
    >
    > Xiaoshen Li <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >I want to buy an electric bike for commuting to work every day, ~ 4
    > >miles one way.

    >
    > Why not use a real one and get some exercise out of the deal?


    Electric-assist bikes have pedals. You can get as much exercise as you
    like on one. There are circumstances when riding a regular bike to
    work might oblige you to get _more_ exercise that you really wanted to
    get at that time.

    An electric bike certainly seems like a better idea for a 4 mile
    commute than a car, if that is the second choice.

    However, I expect that a cheap electric bicycle bought from an auto
    supply would be of the same quality as a cheap regular bicycle from the
    same place: atrocious.

    Chalo Colina
     
  4. dgk

    dgk Guest

    On 13 Jan 2005 01:21:20 -0800, "Chalo" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >dgk wrote:
    >>
    >> Xiaoshen Li <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >I want to buy an electric bike for commuting to work every day, ~ 4
    >> >miles one way.

    >>
    >> Why not use a real one and get some exercise out of the deal?

    >
    >Electric-assist bikes have pedals. You can get as much exercise as you
    >like on one. There are circumstances when riding a regular bike to
    >work might oblige you to get _more_ exercise that you really wanted to
    >get at that time.
    >
    >An electric bike certainly seems like a better idea for a 4 mile
    >commute than a car, if that is the second choice.
    >
    >However, I expect that a cheap electric bicycle bought from an auto
    >supply would be of the same quality as a cheap regular bicycle from the
    >same place: atrocious.
    >
    >Chalo Colina


    Oh, I see it. For a four mile commute? Maybe it is very hilly. There
    are sure times going up the 59th Street Bridge that I could use an
    electric assist. It has a nice retro look to it.

    I think I once read, probably here, that the added weight of battery
    and motor really remove any advantage. Could be right in the long run
    but probably helpful on hills.
     
  5. Maggie

    Maggie Guest

    dgk wrote:
    > On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 09:22:09 -0500, Xiaoshen Li <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Hi,
    > >
    > >I want to buy an electric bike for commuting to work every day, ~ 4
    > >miles one way.
    > >I saw Pepboys Auto is selling APC Electric Cruiser Bike for $249. I

    am
    > >wondering if anybody has experiences/opinions about it.
    > >
    > >Thank you very much.

    >
    > Why not use a real one and get some exercise out of the deal?



    In my opinion an electric bike is more exercise than driving a car and
    great for the environment. Whatever gets you out of a car should be
    encouraged. Roller Blades even.
    Maggie
     
  6. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    dgk wrote:
    >
    > Chalo wrote:
    > >
    > >There are circumstances when riding a regular bike to
    > >work might oblige you to get _more_ exercise that you really wanted

    to
    > >get at that time.
    > >
    > >An electric bike certainly seems like a better idea for a 4 mile
    > >commute than a car, if that is the second choice.

    >
    > Oh, I see it. For a four mile commute? Maybe it is very hilly. There
    > are sure times going up the 59th Street Bridge that I could use an
    > electric assist. It has a nice retro look to it.


    There are plenty of 4 mile rides here in Seattle that feature two 300+
    foot climbs. That might be fine if you're riding for sport or fitness,
    but not so great if you want to ride to work in your work clothes.

    Te specific bike in question might be OK, or it might be junk. But in
    either case, it probably does not require any more committment to
    maintenance or riding technique than a regular one-speed cruiser of
    equivalent quality. For some people, that could make the difference
    between a bike that gets ridden and a bike that doesn't.

    > I think I once read, probably here, that the added weight of battery
    > and motor really remove any advantage. Could be right in the long run
    > but probably helpful on hills.


    To my knowledge, all commercially available electric bikes have a range
    of 20 miles or less on a charge-- sometimes much less, especially if
    the rider isn't contributing much at the pedals. So let's say their
    practical radius of operation is 10 miles.

    For a lot of us here, 10 miles is a very short ride, hardly worth the
    effort to get suited up. An electric bike would not work for us, even
    if we wanted its power assist. But for many people, traveling ten
    miles under their own power is almost unthinkable. For these folks, an
    electric bike allows an amount of speed and mobility on a bicycle that
    their level of committment to cycling would not afford them on a
    pedal-only bike.

    If that means they acquire a habit of replacing car trips with bike
    trips, great. If it builds their enthusiasm to a degree that they
    start riding a good quality pedal-only bike, that's good too. But if
    not, they can still enjoy the modest exercise, stress reduction, and
    community-building effects of cycling.

    Chalo Colina
     
  7. Conniebiker

    Conniebiker New Member

    Joined:
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    I wish it were that cheap to make a really good one. My local shop and I have been working on an electric assist of another sort(as a great deal of shops are now.) Ours is a recumbent 3 wheel(2 front wheels) with standard drive pedals, but the assist would be used for cruising. That would allow the pedal speed to be geared a lot higher than otherwise would be possible, allowing an estimated 45 mph target speed. Also as a primarily pedal machine(though not required to be) the range is only a factor for the 'boosted' period and not for total range. The exact drivetrain is still in question as this is a bit by bit on tight budget project, but sifices to say there are some shops tinkering with motors that can be primary source up to 45mph and still sstrip gears on startup. There will be some cool designs in the next couple years:D
    www.zevltd.com has some cool stuff on the topic.
     
  8. "Chalo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > dgk wrote:
    > >
    > > Xiaoshen Li <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >I want to buy an electric bike for commuting to work every day,

    ~ 4
    > > >miles one way.

    > >

    Have you heard of the two-bricks theory?

    Instead of an electric bike, get a normal bike, and carry around two
    bricks, to simulate the weight of the batteries. When you come to a
    hill, just throw away the bricks, and, with the lighter weight, you
    will sail up, just as if you had a motor,

    Of course, this won't work for the second hill.

    But then, with the usual capacity of batteries, neither will an
    electric bike.

    I suggest a Harley-Davidson, if you want your vehicle to be
    motorised.

    Jeremy Parker
     
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