seized seatpost

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by F. Plant, Jun 16, 2003.

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  1. F. Plant

    F. Plant Guest

    Seized aluminum seatpost in a steel frame. Any anti seize compounds that will do the job? Sheldon
    Brown lists ammonia. Anyone tried this, and if so how long do you need to give it to work and do you
    have to reapply etc.

    TIA
    F. Plant
     
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  2. Carla A-G

    Carla A-G Guest

    "F. Plant" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Seized aluminum seatpost in a steel frame. Any anti seize compounds that will do the job? Sheldon
    > Brown lists ammonia. Anyone tried this, and if
    so
    > how long do you need to give it to work and do you have to reapply etc.

    Try penetrating oil. If that doesn't work, apply heat to the seat tube but not too much heat or you
    will damage the paint job. You only want to get enough heat to make the seat tube expand and not the
    seatpost. Then give that sucker a good hard pull.

    Here's some more tips:

    http://felixwong.com/openroad/bike_projects/removing_stuck_seatpost.html

    http://www.bikezone.com/article/0,5073,980,00.html?category_id=365

    http://it1.insidetri.com/train/bike/articles/1358.0.html

    - CA-G

    Can-Am Girls Kick Ass!
     
  3. Supabonbon

    Supabonbon Guest

    "F. Plant" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Seized aluminum seatpost in a steel frame. Any anti seize compounds that will do the job? Sheldon
    > Brown lists ammonia. Anyone tried this, and if so how long do you need to give it to work and do
    > you have to reapply etc.
    >
    > TIA
    > F. Plant

    1. I applied your basic Liquid Wrench anti-seize oils and such and left it overnight. Tried to
    remove it. No luck. Reapplied. More of the same.
    2. Removed seat and upper half of seatpost clamp, turned bike upsidedown, placing seatpost into
    bench vise. Carefully pushed/pulled the frame by the head tube and seatstays, gradually
    increasing pressure until, after several minutes, I heard a *crack* as the bond between the seat
    tube and post was popped. I was able to move the ends of the frame roughly 2 inches, back and
    forth. After respraying with lube, I resumed twisting, trying to increase the amount, but it
    didn't give. I tried applying upward pressure on the frame while twisting. No go. After 20
    sweaty, angry, frustrated minutes of this, I got another idea.
    3. Out came the 25oz Estwing. I don't remember how i kept the frame upside down, but I started to
    tee off on the post. Gently at first. Then, I summoned the powers of my hamfisted, ex-demo guy
    past and started in full downward swing. After maybe 700 full blows (not exagerrating), it
    started to budge outward a little.
    4. Staggering, I put the mangled seatpost back in the vise. I wiped my hands on my shorts, mopped my
    brow, and took a few deep breaths. After a few grunting, cursing minutes of twisting and pushing
    upwards, seatpost and frame were separated. There was smoke rising from the post like a
    gunslinger's Colt. After maybe an hour and a half, I was free, free at last.
    5. I encountered a mild emotional response. With a lump in my throat, a quiver in my lip and mist in
    my eyes, I went to the corner bodega and bought beer. /s
     
  4. Technician

    Technician Guest

    F. Plant <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > Seized aluminum seatpost in a steel frame. Any anti seize compounds that will do the job? Sheldon
    > Brown lists ammonia. Anyone tried this, and if so how long do you need to give it to work and do
    > you have to reapply etc.
    >
    > TIA
    > F. Plant
    >
    >
    >

    Try a penetrating oil/anti-corrosion agent like PB Blaster, soak over night (don't let it run onto
    plastic parts, and wipe it off the paint surface as it may eat it). it takes greater force to pull
    then to push. assuming you have the room below the seat post, place a block of wood on top of the
    seatpost (remove the saddle clamp) and give it several good square taps. when it has loosened enough
    to slide down a bit, then try and pull it out with a twisting motion (may be easiest to attach a
    seat for a good hand hold and leverage). when you put that, or a new post back in, apply a thin
    layer of grease to the post to help prevent corrosion. it may be a good idea to run a circular wire
    brush down the seat tube a few times to clean it out.
    --
    ~Travis

    http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  5. Andy Chequer

    Andy Chequer Guest

    > 5. I encountered a mild emotional response. With a lump in my throat, a quiver in my lip and mist
    > in my eyes, I went to the corner bodega and bought beer. /s

    I remember the endorphin that coursed through my system after I released a VERY stuck stem from my
    Clockwork.

    Definitely a bicycle repair rush.

    Andy Chequer
     
  6. > Seized aluminum seatpost in a steel frame. Any anti seize compounds that will do the job? Sheldon
    > Brown lists ammonia. Anyone tried this, and if
    so
    > how long do you need to give it to work and do you have to reapply etc.
    >
    > TIA
    > F. Plant

    Not sure about compounds but last time this happened to friend of mine, all he needed was a
    work-bench mounted vice :)

    Step 1: Put seatpost in vice Step 2: ????? Step 3: Profit!

    Small Black Dog (apologies to those who dont watch southpark or read slashdot :D )
     
  7. F. Plant

    F. Plant Guest

    "Small Black Dog" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    snip>
    > Step 1: Put seatpost in vice Step 2: ????? Step 3: Profit!

    The bike has a 2 piece post so I don't want to damage it as everything is still ok except for the
    siezed issue. Its not my bike so I don't want to cause myself any grief by breaking anything, but it
    would be nice to try and nip this in the bud if at all possible. Will probably go the amonia route
    and also CO-2 on the post and boiling water on the tube. If nothing happens I'll just leave for a
    later day when I can justify breaking the post.

    Thanks to all
    F.plant
     
  8. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "F. Plant" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Small Black Dog" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > snip>
    > > Step 1: Put seatpost in vice Step 2: ????? Step 3: Profit!
    >
    > The bike has a 2 piece post so I don't want to damage it as everything is still ok except for the
    > siezed issue. Its not my bike so I don't want to cause myself any grief by breaking anything, but
    > it would be nice to try
    and
    > nip this in the bud if at all possible. Will probably go the amonia route and also CO-2 on the
    > post and boiling water on the tube. If nothing
    happens
    > I'll just leave for a later day when I can justify breaking the post.
    >
    > Thanks to all
    > F.plant

    Ammonia might ruin the post, just a heads up. Have you already tried a lot of PB Blaster/Liquid
    Wrench/Other penetrating lubricant, hit it with a mallet, etc? Your first concern is getting the
    damn thing to twist - if you can do that, then you've basically got it out. The saddle makes a damn
    good lever for this. As sheldon recomends, use a different saddle if you're afraid their saddle will
    be broken. Twist it, pound it, spray it, etc. usually works. Don't worry about the seatpost breaking
    - you're going to have to torque on it the same way no matter what route you go. If it breaks, well,
    it breaks.

    Jon Bond
     
  9. F. Plant

    F. Plant Guest

    "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    >
    snip>
    > Ammonia might ruin the post, just a heads up. Have you already tried a
    lot
    > of PB Blaster/Liquid Wrench/Other penetrating lubricant, hit it with a mallet, etc? Your first
    > concern is getting the damn thing to twist - if
    you
    > can do that, then you've basically got it out. The saddle makes a damn
    good
    > lever for this. As sheldon recomends, use a different saddle if you're afraid their saddle will be
    > broken. Twist it, pound it, spray it, etc. usually works. Don't worry about the seatpost breaking
    > - you're going to have to torque on it the same way no matter what route you go. If it breaks,
    > well, it breaks.
    >
    Thanks for the heads up on the amonia. I'll keep trying penetrating fluids for a while longer. I
    don't want to torque on it too much as its a 2 pc bonded post, and other than the frozen post
    everything is fine. Its my wifes old bike and she was thinking of lowering the seat a bit to make it
    easier to touch the ground with a forward mounted baby carrier on it. Basically if I can get it to
    move, great. If not its no big deal -yet :)

    F.plant
     
  10. Technician

    Technician Guest

    F. Plant <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    >
    > "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]...
    > >
    > snip>
    > > Ammonia might ruin the post, just a heads up. Have you already tried a
    > lot
    > > of PB Blaster/Liquid Wrench/Other penetrating lubricant, hit it with a mallet, etc? Your first
    > > concern is getting the damn thing to twist - if
    > you
    > > can do that, then you've basically got it out. The saddle makes a damn
    > good
    > > lever for this. As sheldon recomends, use a different saddle if you're afraid their saddle will
    > > be broken. Twist it, pound it, spray it, etc. usually works. Don't worry about the seatpost
    > > breaking - you're going to have to torque on it the same way no matter what route you go. If it
    > > breaks, well, it breaks.
    > >
    > Thanks for the heads up on the amonia. I'll keep trying penetrating fluids for a while longer. I
    > don't want to torque on it too much as its a 2 pc bonded post, and other than the frozen post
    > everything is fine. Its my wifes old bike and she was thinking of lowering the seat a bit to make
    > it easier to touch the ground with a forward mounted baby carrier on it. Basically if I can get it
    > to move, great. If not its no big deal -yet :)
    >
    > F.plant
    >
    >
    >

    Assuming the bonded part is the top clamp to the post, try a pipe wrench on the post to get it
    turning. clean the top of the post bone dry (aka, an acetone wash), then wrap an old leather belt
    around the post for protection (wrap it in the direction so when you put the pipe wrench on it it
    tightens up), then slide the pipe wrench over, adjust so it is quite snug against the leather, and
    tug for all your worth on it. if the leather slips, you could try it without it if you don't mind
    scratching and gouging the post. Like others have said, once you get it so it turns, is is all easy
    from there.

    as an option, if you have a rubber mallet, have somebody hold a good pressure on the seat (turning
    force) and give a few good love taps around the top tube. the idea being the hits will compress the
    seat tube slightly (it will spring back, more or less. nothing to an extent that you will notice it
    at all) and crush the corrosion deposits.
    --
    ~Travis

    http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
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