Semi OT: Okay, somebody tell me...

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Wayne Boatwright, Feb 4, 2006.

  1. ....why, when you're eating ice cream interspersed with drinking ice water,
    the ice water tastes colder?

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
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  2. Bronwyn

    Bronwyn Guest

    Beats me! Never tried it!

    Bronwyn
     
  3. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 5 Feb 2006 03:54:37 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
    <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote:

    >...why, when you're eating ice cream interspersed with drinking ice water,
    >the ice water tastes colder?


    Because the ice cream has air in it and therefore isn't as dense
    as the water.

    -sw
     
  4. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Steve Wertz wrote:
    > On 5 Feb 2006 03:54:37 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
    > <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >...why, when you're eating ice cream interspersed with drinking ice water,
    > >the ice water tastes colder?

    >
    > Because the ice cream has air in it and therefore isn't as dense
    > as the water.


    Thats true but only to a very minute degree, mostly because fat is a
    poorer conductor than water, and is denser, it coats, warms to body
    temperature, and tends to stay put, it acts like an insulating blanket,
    like a coating of blubber on an arctic night. Water just constantly
    washes, new cold water arrives before the old can warm, like an ice
    cold mountain stream keeps that case of brews icy cold. If you
    slathered one foot with lard and plunged both into that steam the naked
    foot would begin to go numb from cold while the larded foot stayed nice
    and cozy warm. Also the milk protein thickens the mucous in your
    mouth, adding yet another layer to that insulating blanket. If ever
    you find yourself lost in the mountains on a frigid night and all you
    have to eat is ice cream be sure to save some to protect your fingers,
    toes, and ear lobes. Of course part of that chocolate bar can save you
    from frost bite too. The the coating of fat also prevents rapid
    evaporation from skin, evaporation lowers temperature. Of course
    you're only going to do this out in teh wild if you have a decent
    firearm, because you've now turned yourself ito potent bear bait.
    Naturally if you kill that bear you can survive a long time, edible
    thinsulate!
     
  5. Sheldon wrote:
    > If ever
    > you find yourself lost in the mountains on a frigid night and all you
    > have to eat is ice cream be sure to save some to protect your fingers,
    > toes, and ear lobes.


    You're a murderously stupid person.

    If it's cold enough out to give you hypothermia, then melting the
    ice cream will only give you hypothermia faster, you moron.

    Ice cream is only about 20% fat. The rest is water and sugar.
    The bears are going to chomp you down like the popsicle you
    will be by the time they find you in Spring when they're done
    hibernating.

    --Blair
    "Someone turn off Sheldon's oxygen."
     
  6. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > ...why, when you're eating ice cream interspersed with drinking ice
    > water, the ice water tastes colder?


    I can only imagine it's the fat content in ice cream which, while obviously
    cold, isn't as cold as iced water.

    Jill
     
  7. Because how cold something feels depends as much on the rate at which
    heat can transfer (thermal conductivity) as it does on the temperature
    difference. And for a finite mass, it depends on how much heat has to
    be transferred to raise its temperature (temperature coefficient).

    --Blair
     
  8. On Mon 06 Feb 2006 02:34:38p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it jmcquown?

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> ...why, when you're eating ice cream interspersed with drinking ice
    >> water, the ice water tastes colder?

    >
    > I can only imagine it's the fat content in ice cream which, while obviously
    > cold, isn't as cold as iced water.


    Well, I suspect that cold fat and cold water is the same temperature, but
    cold fat just feels different. I hadn't thought about the fat before.


    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  9. On Mon 06 Feb 2006 05:19:49p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Blair P.
    Houghton?

    > Because how cold something feels depends as much on the rate at which
    > heat can transfer (thermal conductivity) as it does on the temperature
    > difference. And for a finite mass, it depends on how much heat has to
    > be transferred to raise its temperature (temperature coefficient).
    >
    > --Blair
    >

    Yhanks, Blair. Now I understand.


    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
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