Semolina bread

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Terri Williams, Jan 5, 2006.

  1. I visited a bakery in Norfolk (or Portsmouth) VA a few years ago and I
    had the most amazing semolina bread. Anyone have a recipe? I like
    "peasant" type breads, chewy and hearty.

    Terri
     
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  2. Bubba

    Bubba Guest

    Terri Williams wrote:
    > I visited a bakery in Norfolk (or Portsmouth) VA a few years ago and I
    > had the most amazing semolina bread. Anyone have a recipe? I like
    > "peasant" type breads, chewy and hearty.
    >
    > Terri


    Don't really have a recipe for semolina bread but I often replace part
    of bread flour with Semolina (usually in the sponge)...up to about half,
    after that it puts too much load on my mixer.

    Bubba

    --
    You wanna measure or you wanna cook?
     
  3. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    >I visited a bakery in Norfolk (or Portsmouth) VA a few years ago and I
    had the most amazing semolina bread. Anyone have a recipe? I like
    "peasant" type breads, chewy and hearty.

    I personally have never baked this bread but found this recipe online.
    I enjoy baking in the Winter so I will more than likely give this one a
    try. Kev

    SEMOLINA BREAD

    >From the kitchen of Barbara M. - Albuquerque, New Mexico


    1 1/4 cups warm water
    2 cups bread flour
    1 cup semolina flour
    2 teaspoons granulated sugar
    1 1/4 teaspoons salt
    2 teaspoons yeast

    Dough stage - shape into 2 loaves. Place loaves on a greased baking
    sheet. Place on a rack over very hot water in a pot; cover with a
    towel. Let rise for 45 minutes or until doubled in volume.

    Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Slash the tops of the loaves. Bake for
    25 to 30 minutes until golden and hollow sounding when tapped. Cool on
    racks for at least 30 minutes.
     
  4. L, not -L

    L, not -L Guest

    On 5-Jan-2006, Terri Williams <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I visited a bakery in Norfolk (or Portsmouth) VA a few years ago and I
    > had the most amazing semolina bread. Anyone have a recipe? I like
    > "peasant" type breads, chewy and hearty.
    >
    > Terri


    I make a sourdough semolina by simply replacing half the flour with
    semolina, though I have gone as high as 2/3s with no ill effect. It take a
    little longer to fully rise, but otherwise is produced in the same manner as
    my normal sourdough loaf. I do my final mixing and kneading in my bread
    machine, then oven bake, usually in a clay loaf pan.

    1 cup starter (if you don't do sourdough, this might work: 4 fl. oz of water
    with 4 oz. of all-purpose flour, cover and let sit at room temp overnight
    for a mild starter)
    5 ounces water
    6 ounces bread flour (I use King Arthur)
    6 ounces semolina flour
    1 teaspoon sugar
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 teaspoons sesame seeds

    place starter in bowl, mix in all the water, then slowly add the bread flour
    until fully incorporated. Cover and let work at room temperature until nice
    and bubbly. Dump in bread machine, add semolina flour, sugar and salt;
    process on dough cycle. After dough has risen and is punched down by the
    machine, remove, shape or place in loaf pan with sesame seeds evenly spread
    on the bottom. I do the final rise in a proofing box whose bottom is lined
    with a hot, wet towel to keep the moisture level up and temperature a bit
    above room temperature. My proofing boxes are Rubbermaid snap seal, see
    through, plastic boxes I picked up at Lowes for $2 for the small (loaf) size
    and $4 for the large (buns, boules, baguettes, etc). After fully risen, I
    carefully slash and bake. When using the clay loaf pan, I start with a cold
    oven, set to 400F and bake for 25-30 minutes. When making other shapes, I
    preheat oven to 400F and bake 20-25 minutes on a stone (the sesame seeds on
    the bottom will help with sliding the loaf from peel to stone and back.

    --
    To email, replace Cujo with Juno
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    Terri Williams <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I visited a bakery in Norfolk (or Portsmouth) VA a few years ago and I
    > had the most amazing semolina bread. Anyone have a recipe? I like
    > "peasant" type breads, chewy and hearty.


    Not knowing exactly what you're going for, I can't tell you if this
    is what you had, but I have a few recipes I use in my bread machine,
    which you could do as a dough cycle, shape and let rise, then bake on a
    stone. However, the semolina itself is pretty hearty and chewy in a
    bread recipe. The first is the Pain de Mie recipe from Rustic European
    Breads from Your Bread Machine, and I don't have it in front of me right
    now, so I'll get it typed up later, or you can see if your library has
    that book. The second is a sesame-semolina bread that we also really
    enjoy.

    1 1/4 cups water
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    3 cups bread flour
    1 cup semolina flour
    1/2 cup sesame seeds
    1 1/2 teaspoons yeast

    I do this in the bread machine, but you could easily make it the
    standard way by hand.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
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