Sending Ryan Trebon to Italy

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Tom Arsenault, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. Read the article below. I know many of you on here race and or love cross. We from NC are trying to
    send Ryan Trebon to kick some ass in Italy, but of course, the wisdom that is the USCF has seen fit
    to only pay the way for 2 people in the U23 division. Read on, and donate if you can and or want to.

    Tom

    Below is the text from Derek Powers' "Spoke n' Word" column, which runs tommorrow in the Chapel Hill
    News. It concerns Ryan Trebons selection to the US Cyclocross Worlds Team. As many of you know, he
    has to come up with all the money himself. Several people at the recent cross races have given their
    race winnings to help Ryan go to Italy. Read below for a little insight to see what you can do to
    help a boy from the Dirty South out!!!!!!!!

    --------------------

    From an aesthetic point of view, the United States National Cycling Team jersey is a failure. It's
    nowhere near as cool as the ones worn by Italy, Belgium, Germany or France. The colors are ok, but
    the stars that are stuck all over the place kind of makes you look like a kindergartner's art
    project. You'd expect more from a superpower. Look how cool the space shuttle is.

    You take a cyclist, though, and you let him pull that fashion faux pas over his head, and there's
    not an Armani suit in the world that would make him feel better dressed.

    Representing your country is pretty much the universal dream of all young cyclists. Whether it's the
    world championships or the 2 day Tour of Bermuda, the opportunity to race in the stars and stripes
    jersey is the chance of a lifetime.

    The easiest way to earn that privilege, if there is an easy way, is to win the National
    Championships. In cyclocross, at least, if you win the National Championships, you win an all
    expense paid trip to the World Championships. You also get a bunch of cool luggage, some
    deodorant, some Frisco, a shiny medal, and a rather gaudy cycling jersey that has stars and
    stripes all over it.

    While racing in the recent national championships out in Napa Valley California, North Carolina
    rider Ryan Trebon was doing his best to get his soda and luggage and plane tickets when he flatted.
    Not once, of course, but twice. Trebon had led the race from practically the start and could have
    been heading towards a win and a trip to Italy for the World Championships in February when he
    suffered those 2 flats. The flats dropped him back to 7th, well out of contention, but he stuck with
    it and managed to finish 3rd. Third in the National Championships is the crowning achievement in
    most cyclists' careers. I'd trade almost all my results over my 20 years to have finished on the
    podium in a National Championship. Third, however, at least in respect to Worlds qualification, is a
    handshake and a medal - no soda, no jersey, no luggage, and no plane ticket to Italy.

    The selection committee DID offer Trebon one of 5 spots on the World Championship roster, of course
    - an indication that he is QUALIFIED to represent the country in the prestigious event - they're
    just not going to foot the bill for his travel expenses. The free trip goes to the National Champ
    and one other coach's choice (not Trebon, in this case, but rather the rider who finished 5th in
    national championships), the other 3 members of the team can race if they can manage to get
    themselves to the starting line.

    Racing my bike is a lot of fun, but losing to Ryan Trebon week in and week out gets old real fast. I
    can't beat him, no matter what I do. I can't even come close. You can't coach the things he has. You
    can teach tactics and technique and tell people about training, but if you're not born with four
    foot long femurs you're never gonna have them. And you can have heart and you can have guts and you
    can be as tough as nails, but if you don't have double the lung capacity of Jesse Jackson you're
    just out of luck. My mediocrity is the product of years of hard work and perseverance - any one of
    you reading this column could be as good (or bad) as me if you tried long enough. A kid like Ryan
    Trebon, on the other hand, is an elite athlete waiting to happen. You're born that way or you're
    not, it's that black and white. It's just a question of discovering it and developing it.

    That's where the World Championships comes in.

    Racing in that environment - against the best in the world - is an invaluable experience. Going
    straight from high school to the pros might work for some young basketball stars, but the vast
    majority need the skills and discipline that you develop in college to be the best they can be. The
    equivalent to college sports in cycling is international experience. There aren't a lot of
    scholarships out there, that's all.

    And that's the rub -- the little matter of a plane ticket to Monopoli, Italy. Ryan's not sure he can
    afford to go. That would be a shame. I never came close to qualifying, but I'll tell you what --
    When I was his age

    I'd have sold a kidney to go to World Championships. I might have even thrown in my spleen, if it
    would have gotten me a window seat. Ryan isn't auctioning off organs (if he were, I'd be bidding),
    but he IS trying to come up with the funds to make the trip.

    I talked with his girlfriend, a UNC graduate who recently purchased Katie's Pretzels in Carr Mill
    Mall, and we discussed a couple of different fundraising ideas. We came up with some creative stuff,
    but we've got a long way to go. And since you have to start somewhere, I'd like to announce that....

    This column is my contribution.

    I'm dedicating my pay for this column to the Ryan Trebon World Championship fund. It may not be a
    lot, but it's that much more than he had this morning. I'm also appealing to my legion of loyal
    readers. I might not have a huge army of fans, and many of you might be dirt poor bike bums like me.
    But if this story resonates with any of you and you feel inspired to help out, great. We might not
    pay for the whole trip, but a few dollars here and a few dollars there and the burden for him is
    that much easier to handle. If you are interested, send your checks to Katie's Pretzels, 200 N
    Greensboro St, Carrboro, NC, 27510, Attn Ryan Trebon.

    I know there are diseases to cure and hungry people who need your help. This cause is NOT the most
    deserving of your charity. I know that. This is just an chance for a kid with a gift to go and do
    something that most of us will never get to do. That I know him, and his girlfriend, and that I race
    against him make me want to help. I would go looking for help if I were in his shoes, that's for
    sure, and my kidneys would be on E-Bay tomorrow.

    Jacques Cousteau wrote that a man with an opportunity to lead an extraordinary life has no right to
    keep it to himself. I feel that way about Ryan's chance to go to Europe and race in the World
    Championships. And if I can contribute to that in some small way then it's well worth it for me.

    And if he stays there, well, that's one less guy I've got to race against next fall.
     
    Tags:


  2. The following is Steve Johnson of USAC as taken from the USAC web site:

    "The group of American athletes that USA Cycling has assembled to compete at the 2003 World
    Cyclo-cross Championships is one of the strongest ever," said Steve Johnson, COO & Director of
    Athletics for USA Cycling. "The team represents a great balance of experienced riders and young,
    fresh athletes who are getting their first taste of international competition. Exposing young
    riders to a strong international field is a key component of developing a strong, American
    cyclo-cross program."

    Too bad "assembled' doesn't mean "all sent by USAC to the race." Can you see the Italian cycling
    federation announcing that Mario and his team have been "assembled" in Milano but not all
    assembled members will be making the flight to Zolder? At least you can drive if you're
    "assembled" in Europe.

    How about next year, we up the license fees another $5 each and dedicate that to tranport for
    the cross team to the 2004 Worlds?

    BTWmy check is going to Saint Patrick's group in Colorado. I hope all here will contribute
    something to get these folks to Italy.

    Brian Lafferty

    --
    "Tom Arsenault" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Read the article below. I know many of you on here race and or love cross. We from NC are trying
    > to send Ryan Trebon to kick some ass in Italy, but of course, the wisdom that is the USCF has seen
    > fit to only pay the way for 2 people in the U23 division. Read on, and donate if you can and or
    > want to.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Below is the text from Derek Powers' "Spoke n' Word" column, which runs tommorrow in the Chapel
    > Hill News. It concerns Ryan Trebons selection to the US Cyclocross Worlds Team. As many of you
    > know, he has to come up with all the money himself. Several people at the recent cross races have
    > given their race winnings to help Ryan go to Italy. Read below for a little insight to see what
    > you can do to help a boy from the Dirty South out!!!!!!!!
    >
    > --------------------
    >
    > From an aesthetic point of view, the United States National Cycling Team jersey is a failure. It's
    > nowhere near as cool as the ones worn by Italy, Belgium, Germany or France. The colors are ok, but
    > the stars that are stuck all over the place kind of makes you look like a kindergartner's art
    > project. You'd expect more from a superpower. Look how cool the space shuttle is.
    >
    > You take a cyclist, though, and you let him pull that fashion faux pas over his head, and there's
    > not an Armani suit in the world that would make him feel better dressed.
    >
    > Representing your country is pretty much the universal dream of all young cyclists. Whether it's
    > the world championships or the 2 day Tour of Bermuda, the opportunity to race in the stars and
    > stripes jersey is the chance of a lifetime.
    >
    > The easiest way to earn that privilege, if there is an easy way, is to win the National
    > Championships. In cyclocross, at least, if you win the National Championships, you win an all
    > expense paid trip to the World Championships. You also get a bunch of cool luggage, some
    > deodorant, some Frisco, a shiny medal, and a rather gaudy cycling jersey that has stars and
    > stripes all over it.
    >
    > While racing in the recent national championships out in Napa Valley California, North Carolina
    > rider Ryan Trebon was doing his best to get his soda and luggage and plane tickets when he
    > flatted. Not once, of course, but twice. Trebon had led the race from practically the start and
    > could have been heading towards a win and a trip to Italy for the World Championships in February
    > when he suffered those 2 flats. The flats dropped him back to 7th, well out of contention, but he
    > stuck with it and managed to finish 3rd. Third in the National Championships is the crowning
    > achievement in most cyclists' careers. I'd trade almost all my results over my 20 years to have
    > finished on the podium in a National Championship. Third, however, at least in respect to Worlds
    > qualification, is a handshake and a medal - no soda, no jersey, no luggage, and no plane ticket
    > to Italy.
    >
    > The selection committee DID offer Trebon one of 5 spots on the World Championship roster, of
    > course - an indication that he is QUALIFIED to represent the country in the prestigious event -
    > they're just not going to foot the bill for his travel expenses. The free trip goes to the
    > National Champ and one other coach's choice (not Trebon, in this case, but rather the rider who
    > finished 5th in national championships), the other 3 members of the team can race if they can
    > manage to get themselves to the starting line.
    >
    > Racing my bike is a lot of fun, but losing to Ryan Trebon week in and week out gets old real
    > fast. I can't beat him, no matter what I do. I can't even come close. You can't coach the things
    > he has. You can teach tactics and technique and tell people about training, but if you're not
    > born with four foot long femurs you're never gonna have them. And you can have heart and you can
    > have guts and you can be as tough as nails, but if you don't have double the lung capacity of
    > Jesse Jackson you're just out of luck. My mediocrity is the product of years of hard work and
    > perseverance - any one of you reading this column could be as good (or bad) as me if you tried
    > long enough. A kid like Ryan Trebon, on the other hand, is an elite athlete waiting to happen.
    > You're born that way or you're not, it's that black and white. It's just a question of
    > discovering it and developing it.
    >
    > That's where the World Championships comes in.
    >
    > Racing in that environment - against the best in the world - is an invaluable experience. Going
    > straight from high school to the pros might work for some young basketball stars, but the vast
    > majority need the skills and discipline that you develop in college to be the best they can be.
    > The equivalent to college sports in cycling is international experience. There aren't a lot of
    > scholarships out there, that's all.
    >
    > And that's the rub -- the little matter of a plane ticket to Monopoli, Italy. Ryan's not sure he
    > can afford to go. That would be a shame. I never came close to qualifying, but I'll tell you what
    > -- When I was his age
    >
    > I'd have sold a kidney to go to World Championships. I might have even thrown in my spleen, if it
    > would have gotten me a window seat. Ryan isn't auctioning off organs (if he were, I'd be bidding),
    > but he IS trying to come up with the funds to make the trip.
    >
    > I talked with his girlfriend, a UNC graduate who recently purchased Katie's Pretzels in Carr Mill
    > Mall, and we discussed a couple of different fundraising ideas. We came up with some creative
    > stuff, but we've got a long way to go. And since you have to start somewhere, I'd like to announce
    > that....
    >
    > This column is my contribution.
    >
    > I'm dedicating my pay for this column to the Ryan Trebon World Championship fund. It may not be a
    > lot, but it's that much more than he had this morning. I'm also appealing to my legion of loyal
    > readers. I might not have a huge army of fans, and many of you might be dirt poor bike bums like
    > me. But if this story resonates with any of you and you feel inspired to help out, great. We might
    > not pay for the whole trip, but a few dollars here and a few dollars there and the burden for him
    > is that much easier to handle. If you are interested, send your checks to Katie's Pretzels, 200 N
    > Greensboro St, Carrboro, NC, 27510, Attn Ryan Trebon.
    >
    > I know there are diseases to cure and hungry people who need your help. This cause is NOT the most
    > deserving of your charity. I know that. This is just an chance for a kid with a gift to go and do
    > something that most of us will never get to do. That I know him, and his girlfriend, and that I
    > race against him make me want to help. I would go looking for help if I were in his shoes, that's
    > for sure, and my kidneys would be on E-Bay tomorrow.
    >
    > Jacques Cousteau wrote that a man with an opportunity to lead an extraordinary life has no right
    > to keep it to himself. I feel that way about Ryan's chance to go to Europe and race in the World
    > Championships. And if I can contribute to that in some small way then it's well worth it for me.
    >
    > And if he stays there, well, that's one less guy I've got to race against next fall.
     
  3. And for those nay-sayers that say Ryan (aka Pork Chop) has no chance let me say this:

    I wouldn't bet against him.

    Ryan was on our team down here in Tampa a few moons ago and let me tell you, that kid can lay down a
    brutal, punishing pace.

    I don't think he's even 20 yet, but he got second in the espoir natz crit last year after dragging
    the eventual winner around while the two of them lapped the field.

    Every now and then he'll show up to one of our weekly hammer fests and show us all what laying the
    hammer down really means. He'll ride on the front for 10 minutes at a time at 30+mph just shelling
    people left and right. He's really one of the most talented riders I've *ever* seen; and I've seen
    quite a few.

    I don't have much money myself, but I'm going to send some to PorkChop to make sure he represents.
    He's *by far* our best hope.

    - Boyd S.

    [email protected] (Tom Arsenault) wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Read the article below. I know many of you on here race and or love cross. We from NC are trying
    > to send Ryan Trebon to kick some ass in Italy, but of course, the wisdom that is the USCF has seen
    > fit to only pay the way for 2 people in the U23 division. Read on, and donate if you can and or
    > want to.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    > Below is the text from Derek Powers' "Spoke n' Word" column, which runs tommorrow in the Chapel
    > Hill News. It concerns Ryan Trebons selection to the US Cyclocross Worlds Team. As many of you
    > know, he has to come up with all the money himself. Several people at the recent cross races have
    > given their race winnings to help Ryan go to Italy. Read below for a little insight to see what
    > you can do to help a boy from the Dirty South out!!!!!!!!
    >
    > --------------------
    >
    > From an aesthetic point of view, the United States National Cycling Team jersey is a failure. It's
    > nowhere near as cool as the ones worn by Italy, Belgium, Germany or France. The colors are ok, but
    > the stars that are stuck all over the place kind of makes you look like a kindergartner's art
    > project. You'd expect more from a superpower. Look how cool the space shuttle is.
    >
    > You take a cyclist, though, and you let him pull that fashion faux pas over his head, and there's
    > not an Armani suit in the world that would make him feel better dressed.
    >
    > Representing your country is pretty much the universal dream of all young cyclists. Whether it's
    > the world championships or the 2 day Tour of Bermuda, the opportunity to race in the stars and
    > stripes jersey is the chance of a lifetime.
    >
    > The easiest way to earn that privilege, if there is an easy way, is to win the National
    > Championships. In cyclocross, at least, if you win the National Championships, you win an all
    > expense paid trip to the World Championships. You also get a bunch of cool luggage, some
    > deodorant, some Frisco, a shiny medal, and a rather gaudy cycling jersey that has stars and
    > stripes all over it.
    >
    > While racing in the recent national championships out in Napa Valley California, North Carolina
    > rider Ryan Trebon was doing his best to get his soda and luggage and plane tickets when he
    > flatted. Not once, of course, but twice. Trebon had led the race from practically the start and
    > could have been heading towards a win and a trip to Italy for the World Championships in February
    > when he suffered those 2 flats. The flats dropped him back to 7th, well out of contention, but he
    > stuck with it and managed to finish 3rd. Third in the National Championships is the crowning
    > achievement in most cyclists' careers. I'd trade almost all my results over my 20 years to have
    > finished on the podium in a National Championship. Third, however, at least in respect to Worlds
    > qualification, is a handshake and a medal - no soda, no jersey, no luggage, and no plane ticket
    > to Italy.
    >
    > The selection committee DID offer Trebon one of 5 spots on the World Championship roster, of
    > course - an indication that he is QUALIFIED to represent the country in the prestigious event -
    > they're just not going to foot the bill for his travel expenses. The free trip goes to the
    > National Champ and one other coach's choice (not Trebon, in this case, but rather the rider who
    > finished 5th in national championships), the other 3 members of the team can race if they can
    > manage to get themselves to the starting line.
    >
    > Racing my bike is a lot of fun, but losing to Ryan Trebon week in and week out gets old real
    > fast. I can't beat him, no matter what I do. I can't even come close. You can't coach the things
    > he has. You can teach tactics and technique and tell people about training, but if you're not
    > born with four foot long femurs you're never gonna have them. And you can have heart and you can
    > have guts and you can be as tough as nails, but if you don't have double the lung capacity of
    > Jesse Jackson you're just out of luck. My mediocrity is the product of years of hard work and
    > perseverance - any one of you reading this column could be as good (or bad) as me if you tried
    > long enough. A kid like Ryan Trebon, on the other hand, is an elite athlete waiting to happen.
    > You're born that way or you're not, it's that black and white. It's just a question of
    > discovering it and developing it.
    >
    > That's where the World Championships comes in.
    >
    > Racing in that environment - against the best in the world - is an invaluable experience. Going
    > straight from high school to the pros might work for some young basketball stars, but the vast
    > majority need the skills and discipline that you develop in college to be the best they can be.
    > The equivalent to college sports in cycling is international experience. There aren't a lot of
    > scholarships out there, that's all.
    >
    > And that's the rub -- the little matter of a plane ticket to Monopoli, Italy. Ryan's not sure he
    > can afford to go. That would be a shame. I never came close to qualifying, but I'll tell you what
    > -- When I was his age
    >
    > I'd have sold a kidney to go to World Championships. I might have even thrown in my spleen, if it
    > would have gotten me a window seat. Ryan isn't auctioning off organs (if he were, I'd be bidding),
    > but he IS trying to come up with the funds to make the trip.
    >
    > I talked with his girlfriend, a UNC graduate who recently purchased Katie's Pretzels in Carr Mill
    > Mall, and we discussed a couple of different fundraising ideas. We came up with some creative
    > stuff, but we've got a long way to go. And since you have to start somewhere, I'd like to announce
    > that....
    >
    > This column is my contribution.
    >
    > I'm dedicating my pay for this column to the Ryan Trebon World Championship fund. It may not be a
    > lot, but it's that much more than he had this morning. I'm also appealing to my legion of loyal
    > readers. I might not have a huge army of fans, and many of you might be dirt poor bike bums like
    > me. But if this story resonates with any of you and you feel inspired to help out, great. We might
    > not pay for the whole trip, but a few dollars here and a few dollars there and the burden for him
    > is that much easier to handle. If you are interested, send your checks to Katie's Pretzels, 200 N
    > Greensboro St, Carrboro, NC, 27510, Attn Ryan Trebon.
    >
    > I know there are diseases to cure and hungry people who need your help. This cause is NOT the most
    > deserving of your charity. I know that. This is just an chance for a kid with a gift to go and do
    > something that most of us will never get to do. That I know him, and his girlfriend, and that I
    > race against him make me want to help. I would go looking for help if I were in his shoes, that's
    > for sure, and my kidneys would be on E-Bay tomorrow.
    >
    > Jacques Cousteau wrote that a man with an opportunity to lead an extraordinary life has no right
    > to keep it to himself. I feel that way about Ryan's chance to go to Europe and race in the World
    > Championships. And if I can contribute to that in some small way then it's well worth it for me.
    >
    > And if he stays there, well, that's one less guy I've got to race against next fall.
     
  4. Michael Hoyt

    Michael Hoyt Guest

    When is Cross Worlds?

    I talked with a friend of mine who was at Nats. riding for his college. He said Ryan had a
    great ride.

    M

    Tom Arsenault wrote:

    > Read the article below. I know many of you on here race and or love cross. We from NC are trying
    > to send Ryan Trebon to kick some ass in Italy, but of course, the wisdom that is the USCF has seen
    > fit to only pay the way for 2 people in the U23 division. Read on, and donate if you can and or
    > want to.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    > Below is the text from Derek Powers' "Spoke n' Word" column, which runs tommorrow in the Chapel
    > Hill News. It concerns Ryan Trebons selection to the US Cyclocross Worlds Team. As many of you
    > know, he has to come up with all the money himself. Several people at the recent cross races have
    > given their race winnings to help Ryan go to Italy. Read below for a little insight to see what
    > you can do to help a boy from the Dirty South out!!!!!!!!
    >
    > --------------------
    >
    > From an aesthetic point of view, the United States National Cycling Team jersey is a failure. It's
    > nowhere near as cool as the ones worn by Italy, Belgium, Germany or France. The colors are ok, but
    > the stars that are stuck all over the place kind of makes you look like a kindergartner's art
    > project. You'd expect more from a superpower. Look how cool the space shuttle is.
    >
    > You take a cyclist, though, and you let him pull that fashion faux pas over his head, and there's
    > not an Armani suit in the world that would make him feel better dressed.
    >
    > Representing your country is pretty much the universal dream of all young cyclists. Whether it's
    > the world championships or the 2 day Tour of Bermuda, the opportunity to race in the stars and
    > stripes jersey is the chance of a lifetime.
    >
    > The easiest way to earn that privilege, if there is an easy way, is to win the National
    > Championships. In cyclocross, at least, if you win the National Championships, you win an all
    > expense paid trip to the World Championships. You also get a bunch of cool luggage, some
    > deodorant, some Frisco, a shiny medal, and a rather gaudy cycling jersey that has stars and
    > stripes all over it.
    >
    > While racing in the recent national championships out in Napa Valley California, North Carolina
    > rider Ryan Trebon was doing his best to get his soda and luggage and plane tickets when he
    > flatted. Not once, of course, but twice. Trebon had led the race from practically the start and
    > could have been heading towards a win and a trip to Italy for the World Championships in February
    > when he suffered those 2 flats. The flats dropped him back to 7th, well out of contention, but he
    > stuck with it and managed to finish 3rd. Third in the National Championships is the crowning
    > achievement in most cyclists' careers. I'd trade almost all my results over my 20 years to have
    > finished on the podium in a National Championship. Third, however, at least in respect to Worlds
    > qualification, is a handshake and a medal - no soda, no jersey, no luggage, and no plane ticket
    > to Italy.
    >
    > The selection committee DID offer Trebon one of 5 spots on the World Championship roster, of
    > course - an indication that he is QUALIFIED to represent the country in the prestigious event -
    > they're just not going to foot the bill for his travel expenses. The free trip goes to the
    > National Champ and one other coach's choice (not Trebon, in this case, but rather the rider who
    > finished 5th in national championships), the other 3 members of the team can race if they can
    > manage to get themselves to the starting line.
    >
    > Racing my bike is a lot of fun, but losing to Ryan Trebon week in and week out gets old real
    > fast. I can't beat him, no matter what I do. I can't even come close. You can't coach the things
    > he has. You can teach tactics and technique and tell people about training, but if you're not
    > born with four foot long femurs you're never gonna have them. And you can have heart and you can
    > have guts and you can be as tough as nails, but if you don't have double the lung capacity of
    > Jesse Jackson you're just out of luck. My mediocrity is the product of years of hard work and
    > perseverance - any one of you reading this column could be as good (or bad) as me if you tried
    > long enough. A kid like Ryan Trebon, on the other hand, is an elite athlete waiting to happen.
    > You're born that way or you're not, it's that black and white. It's just a question of
    > discovering it and developing it.
    >
    > That's where the World Championships comes in.
    >
    > Racing in that environment - against the best in the world - is an invaluable experience. Going
    > straight from high school to the pros might work for some young basketball stars, but the vast
    > majority need the skills and discipline that you develop in college to be the best they can be.
    > The equivalent to college sports in cycling is international experience. There aren't a lot of
    > scholarships out there, that's all.
    >
    > And that's the rub -- the little matter of a plane ticket to Monopoli, Italy. Ryan's not sure he
    > can afford to go. That would be a shame. I never came close to qualifying, but I'll tell you what
    > -- When I was his age
    >
    > I'd have sold a kidney to go to World Championships. I might have even thrown in my spleen, if it
    > would have gotten me a window seat. Ryan isn't auctioning off organs (if he were, I'd be bidding),
    > but he IS trying to come up with the funds to make the trip.
    >
    > I talked with his girlfriend, a UNC graduate who recently purchased Katie's Pretzels in Carr Mill
    > Mall, and we discussed a couple of different fundraising ideas. We came up with some creative
    > stuff, but we've got a long way to go. And since you have to start somewhere, I'd like to announce
    > that....
    >
    > This column is my contribution.
    >
    > I'm dedicating my pay for this column to the Ryan Trebon World Championship fund. It may not be a
    > lot, but it's that much more than he had this morning. I'm also appealing to my legion of loyal
    > readers. I might not have a huge army of fans, and many of you might be dirt poor bike bums like
    > me. But if this story resonates with any of you and you feel inspired to help out, great. We might
    > not pay for the whole trip, but a few dollars here and a few dollars there and the burden for him
    > is that much easier to handle. If you are interested, send your checks to Katie's Pretzels, 200 N
    > Greensboro St, Carrboro, NC, 27510, Attn Ryan Trebon.
    >
    > I know there are diseases to cure and hungry people who need your help. This cause is NOT the most
    > deserving of your charity. I know that. This is just an chance for a kid with a gift to go and do
    > something that most of us will never get to do. That I know him, and his girlfriend, and that I
    > race against him make me want to help. I would go looking for help if I were in his shoes, that's
    > for sure, and my kidneys would be on E-Bay tomorrow.
    >
    > Jacques Cousteau wrote that a man with an opportunity to lead an extraordinary life has no right
    > to keep it to himself. I feel that way about Ryan's chance to go to Europe and race in the World
    > Championships. And if I can contribute to that in some small way then it's well worth it for me.
    >
    > And if he stays there, well, that's one less guy I've got to race against next fall.
     
  5. Danny Callen

    Danny Callen Guest

    "Tom Arsenault" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Read the article below. I know many of you on here race and or love cross. We from NC are trying
    > to send Ryan Trebon to kick some ass in Italy, but of course, the wisdom that is the USCF has seen
    > fit to only pay the way for 2 people in the U23 division. Read on, and donate if you can and or
    > want to.
    >
    > Tom
    >

    Tom, The American Cyclocross Foundation is planning on divying up funds to help send the 12
    unsuppoprted atheletes that were selected. If my figures are right, Ryan should see about $1000
    from the ACF.

    I'll double check and get back to you.

    Danny Callen
     
  6. [email protected] (Tom Kunich) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Danny Callen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Tom Arsenault" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Read the article below. I know many of you on here race and or love cross. We from NC are
    > > > trying to send Ryan Trebon to kick some ass in Italy, but of course, the wisdom that is the
    > > > USCF has seen fit to only pay the way for 2 people in the U23 division. Read on, and donate if
    > > > you can and or want to.
    > > >
    > > > Tom
    > > >
    > >
    > > Tom, The American Cyclocross Foundation is planning on divying up funds to help send the 12
    > > unsuppoprted atheletes that were selected. If my figures are right, Ryan should see about $1000
    > > from the ACF.
    > >
    > > I'll double check and get back to you.
    >
    > You can now paypal the American Cyclo-cross Foundation so it makes donating some money to a very
    > worthy cause quite easy and painless.
    >
    > All you have to do is go to Paypal and then go to the Send Money tab and send your donation to:
    >
    > [email protected]
    >
    > OK, all you losers put your money where your mouths are.

    I actually gave my donation directly to Ryan, and I did receive a good e-mail from Patrick O'Grady.
    He and the ACF are doing tons for these people heading over to Italy. I say keep up the good work,
    and keep those donations coming in.

    Tom
     
  7. Jim Gravity

    Jim Gravity Guest

    > You can now paypal the American Cyclo-cross Foundation so it makes donating some money to a very
    > worthy cause quite easy and painless.
    >
    >

    Last year I sent a check, $20 or so to ACF. IIRC, a few weeks after I sent it in, there was a
    t-shirt reward for giving like $25. Do I recall correctly? I didn't send my $20 in 'cause I wanted
    something, but after the fact, I felt I got a raw deal. I'm holding out 'till closer to worlds
    before I get out the checkbook this year.
     
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