seriously, don't buy a Halfords bike

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by MartinM, Apr 17, 2006.

  1. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    I knew Halfrauds were not averse to fitting low spec components to
    their bikes in the hope that by fitting enough big name Shimano gear
    no-one would notice but this takes the biscuit;
    My nephew's MTB (Carrera Kraken SE) is about 3-4 years old and the
    "sealed" BB has been
    slowly degenarating over that time. My brother finally decided to
    replace it (when it started making more noise than the non-oiled chain,
    teenagers eh!) to discover that it's not a sealed BB but a standard
    bearing one with fake splined nuts either side. This is doubly bad as
    it means a. the BB is non-adjustable b. the fake splined drives are too
    thin to be able to get a tool on with any great effect. It has been
    back to the shop where they failed to get the RH one off. Eventually
    bolting the tool to the errant nut and standing on a large adjustable
    spanner did the job and earnt me lots of BEER. How many pence did they
    actually save by fitting this load of rubbish rather than the proper
    part?

    caveat emptor
     
    Tags:


  2. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    MartinM wrote:
    > I knew Halfrauds were not averse to fitting low spec components to
    > their bikes in the hope that by fitting enough big name Shimano gear
    > no-one would notice but this takes the biscuit;
    > My nephew's MTB (Carrera Kraken SE) is about 3-4 years old and the
    > "sealed" BB has been
    > slowly degenarating over that time. My brother finally decided to
    > replace it (when it started making more noise than the non-oiled chain,
    > teenagers eh!) to discover that it's not a sealed BB but a standard
    > bearing one with fake splined nuts either side. This is doubly bad as
    > it means a. the BB is non-adjustable b. the fake splined drives are too
    > thin to be able to get a tool on with any great effect. It has been
    > back to the shop where they failed to get the RH one off. Eventually
    > bolting the tool to the errant nut and standing on a large adjustable
    > spanner did the job and earnt me lots of BEER. How many pence did they
    > actually save by fitting this load of rubbish rather than the proper
    > part?
    >


    BBs are always a favourite place to save money on cheap bikes especially
    as almost no-one will notice. OTOH 3-4 years for an unserviced bearing
    BB isn't bad going and after that period of time untouched, your removal
    technique would probably be needed for many.

    I'd still avoid Halfrauds though.

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    MartinM wrote:
    > I knew Halfrauds were not averse to fitting low spec components to
    > their bikes in the hope that by fitting enough big name Shimano gear
    > no-one would notice but this takes the biscuit;
    > My nephew's MTB (Carrera Kraken SE) is about 3-4 years old and the
    > "sealed" BB has been
    > slowly degenarating over that time. My brother finally decided to
    > replace it (when it started making more noise than the non-oiled
    > chain, teenagers eh!) to discover that it's not a sealed BB but a
    > standard bearing one with fake splined nuts either side. This is
    > doubly bad as it means a. the BB is non-adjustable b. the fake
    > splined drives are too thin to be able to get a tool on with any
    > great effect. It has been back to the shop where they failed to get
    > the RH one off. Eventually bolting the tool to the errant nut and
    > standing on a large adjustable spanner did the job and earnt me lots
    > of BEER. How many pence did they actually save by fitting this load
    > of rubbish rather than the proper part?


    This is not unique to Halfords. Big names like Trek have done (or still
    do?) the same sort of thing. I'm particularly thinking of the BB and hubs
    that came with the Trek 820 a few years ago: rubbish, though the rest of
    the bike is fine.

    ~PB
     
  4. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:

    > This is not unique to Halfords. Big names like Trek have done (or still
    > do?) the same sort of thing. I'm particularly thinking of the BB and hubs
    > that came with the Trek 820 a few years ago: rubbish, though the rest of
    > the bike is fine.


    I wouldn't have a problem with them if they just fitted a cheap
    non-sealed one; it's the fact that they put a fake one on which by the
    time you realise is too late to do anything about it if it's seized on
    (goes off to check BB on Trek mtb)
     
  5. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Bill wrote:

    £71 for two
    > years trouble free riding can't be bad!


    definitely, although IMX some cheap bikes need the same amount as the
    new price of the bike spending on them in the first couple of years.
    You've been lucky.

    the Kraken was £299 though; you would expect a half decent BB for that
    sort of dosh
     
  6. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "MartinM" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    the Kraken was £299 though; you would expect a half decent BB for that
    sort of dosh

    Definitely can't argue with that!!
     
  7. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Bill wrote:
    > so bought a cheapo mountain bike, deliberately cheapo
    > (£69) [...] I changed all the components, Cups, crank and
    > uncaged bearings, which cost me £12, [...] £71 for two
    > years trouble free riding can't be bad!


    Plays hell with your ability to do arithmetic though..

    ...d
     
  8. del

    del Guest

    On Monday 17 Apr 2006 13:00 David Martin, wrote:

    >
    > Bill wrote:
    >> so bought a cheapo mountain bike, deliberately cheapo
    >> (£69) [...] I changed all the components, Cups, crank and
    >> uncaged bearings, which cost me £12, [...] £71 for two
    >> years trouble free riding can't be bad!

    >
    > Plays hell with your ability to do arithmetic though..
    >


    That'll be the depreciation.
    --
    del :cool:
     
  9. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    Bill wrote:

    > I cycle 3 miles to work most days, plus a few hundred yards down to the
    > shops now and then, so bought a cheapo mountain bike, deliberately cheapo
    > (£69) so I wouldn't worry too much if it got nicked and to save wear and
    > tear on my road bike. It's a Probike, with a full alloy frame and decent
    > shimano gearing, but I had the same problem with the bottom bracket and it
    > wasn't disguised as a sealed unit. Two weeks it lasted, then developed play
    > that wouldn't adjust out. I changed all the components, Cups, crank and
    > uncaged bearings, which cost me £12, and have ridden it daily now for two
    > years without any problems at all and it still rides nice.


    If it failed after 2 weeks I'd have thought that would've been a
    warranty job, even on a £69 bike.

    --
    Dave...
     
  10. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    dkahn400 wrote:

    > If it failed after 2 weeks I'd have thought that would've been a
    > warranty job, even on a £69 bike.


    So they replace the one manufactured from reject Brie with another made
    from reject Brie... might as well put in something that at least aspires
    to being merely adequate.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  11. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "MartinM" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I knew Halfrauds were not averse to fitting low spec components to
    > their bikes in the hope that by fitting enough big name Shimano gear
    > no-one would notice but this takes the biscuit;


    Gordon Bennet!
    I've seen all kinds of penny pinching where it's less likely to be noticed.
    My 1500 pound Marin had a shit headset. My 350ish pound Specialized Hardrock
    had a breakeasy freehub that was non-Shimano compatible meaning when it
    broke it was more economically viable to replace the whole wheel. The
    seatpost broke during a ride, there was a later recall. My 1500 pound
    Cannondale R900 departed from Shimano for the brake calipers, the brakes
    worked fine but the fasteners went rusty prematurely etc etc.
    Have a dig at Halrauds if you must but for valid reasons.
     
  12. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > dkahn400 wrote:
    >
    >> If it failed after 2 weeks I'd have thought that would've been a
    >> warranty job, even on a £69 bike.

    >
    > So they replace the one manufactured from reject Brie with another made
    > from reject Brie... might as well put in something that at least aspires
    > to being merely adequate.


    My thoughts exactly, and it's been more than adequate for the use I wanted
    it for. I appreciate that on this group anything that doesn't burn a hole
    in a years salary is automatically classed as crap, but why should I spend
    hundreds to pootle to work each day, and if it got nicked, who cares, I
    doubt I would even report it to the police.

    I have a Dawes Giro 400 plus an older Giro 300 to use if I want to cycle any
    distance. I also have a very old trade bike with a huge basket on the front,
    brilliant for shopping, and it will still be going strong when all your
    expensive mountain bikes are on the dump!

    Bill
     
  13. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Bill wrote:

    I appreciate that on this group anything that doesn't burn a hole
    > in a years salary is automatically classed as crap,


    I'm not going to dip too deeply into this but I certainly don't hold
    that view; there are as you say plenty of cheap bikes out there that do
    the job they were purchased for perfectly. My ethos with buying bits is
    to get the best quality for the money without going into silly
    territory (ie Dura-Ace etc land).
     
  14. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Bill wrote:
    > "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > dkahn400 wrote:
    > >
    > >> If it failed after 2 weeks I'd have thought that would've been a
    > >> warranty job, even on a £69 bike.

    > >
    > > So they replace the one manufactured from reject Brie with another made
    > > from reject Brie... might as well put in something that at least aspires
    > > to being merely adequate.

    >
    > My thoughts exactly, and it's been more than adequate for the use I wanted
    > it for. I appreciate that on this group anything that doesn't burn a hole
    > in a years salary is automatically classed as crap, but why should I spend
    > hundreds to pootle to work each day, and if it got nicked, who cares, I
    > doubt I would even report it to the police.
    >
    > I have a Dawes Giro 400 plus an older Giro 300 to use if I want to cycle any
    > distance. I also have a very old trade bike with a huge basket on the front,
    > brilliant for shopping, and it will still be going strong when all your
    > expensive mountain bikes are on the dump!


    My not very expensive MTB has cost me probably three times it's
    original purchase price and is now 9 years old.

    The road bike I bought as a bare frame in 1989 and built up. The
    current wheels were built in the early 90's.

    Just wondering how long other people keep their bikes, or is it a case
    of how well locked they are so teh at the thievingpikeychavscum don't
    make off with it. There does seem to be a tendency to get new bikes
    fairly frequently, or maybe just to talk about it if you have got a new
    one (I'm sure WTG would tellus if he had bought a new brompton)..

    ...d
     
  15. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Bill wrote:

    > My thoughts exactly, and it's been more than adequate for the use I wanted
    > it for. I appreciate that on this group anything that doesn't burn a hole
    > in a years salary is automatically classed as crap


    I take it you haven't noticed posts from all the people happily riding
    off from Lidl having spent as much as several whole pounds on all sorts
    of cycling goodies?

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  16. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    MartinM wrote:
    > Bill wrote:
    >
    > I appreciate that on this group anything that doesn't burn a hole
    > > in a years salary is automatically classed as crap,

    >
    > I'm not going to dip too deeply into this but I certainly don't hold
    > that view; there are as you say plenty of cheap bikes out there that do
    > the job they were purchased for perfectly. My ethos with buying bits is
    > to get the best quality for the money without going into silly
    > territory (ie Dura-Ace etc land).


    I have found that the price point for best value for money seems to be
    around the Deore - XT level (105-Ultegra). Cheaper components seem to
    degrade rather too rapidly. More expensive ones are too expensive for
    the performance (by which I mean the year in, year out continuous
    working without grief type rather than speed).

    I do have dura-ace bits on my road bike, to wit the cable stops on the
    DT bosses. I also have some cheap bits.

    ...d
     
  17. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    David Martin wrote:

    > Just wondering how long other people keep their bikes


    My first "proper" bike was a Raleigh Olympus which was eventually
    half-inched while I was a student at Edinburgh after I'd had it about
    7-8 years. That was replaced on the insurance by an EBC Country in '89,
    which was my only bike until '97 when an EBC Contour 400 MTB joined it.
    I gave away the Country a couple of years ago, still got the Countour
    400 and use it on my occasional MTB forays. I've had the Streetmachine
    and Brompton about 5 years and have no intention of replacing either
    until they show signs of wearing out, which they're not doing...

    > There does seem to be a tendency to get new bikes
    > fairly frequently, or maybe just to talk about it if you have got a new
    > one (I'm sure WTG would tellus if he had bought a new brompton)..


    Supplementing and replacing are two different things though. I've
    bought all the bikes since the Country to do things my existing bikes
    wouldn't do nearly as well.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  18. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Bill wrote:
    >
    >> My thoughts exactly, and it's been more than adequate for the use I
    >> wanted it for. I appreciate that on this group anything that doesn't
    >> burn a hole in a years salary is automatically classed as crap

    >
    > I take it you haven't noticed posts from all the people happily riding off
    > from Lidl having spent as much as several whole pounds on all sorts of
    > cycling goodies?


    I have, and have joined them, well from Aldi, as we don't have a Lidl near.
    However, I was talking bikes not clothing and accessories.

    Bill
     
  19. Richard

    Richard Guest

    David Martin wrote:
    > Just wondering how long other people keep their bikes,


    I had a Raleigh Sprint new in 1983. Around 1991 the frame was repaired
    under warranty. Around 1995 the saddle was replaced. Around 1996 the
    handlebars were replaced. I've lost track of wheels, cogs, chains,
    mudguards, etc. I think the forks are original. It retired c.2000,
    and last week I gave it to my cousin.

    R.
     
  20. Roos Eisma

    Roos Eisma Guest

    "David Martin" <[email protected]> writes:

    >Just wondering how long other people keep their bikes, or is it a case
    >of how well locked they are so teh at the thievingpikeychavscum don't
    >make off with it. There does seem to be a tendency to get new bikes
    >fairly frequently, or maybe just to talk about it if you have got a new
    >one (I'm sure WTG would tellus if he had bought a new brompton)..


    My oldest bike-in-regular-use (ignoring the one I keep for sentimental
    reasons which haven't ridden for years) was bought new in 1995.
    I received two new front wheels since then, the first one because it got
    stolen, the second one because Santa gave me a new one with a dynohub.
    And various transmission related bits and pieces have been replaced a
    number of times. And it recently got a new bell.

    Roos
     
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