seriously, don't buy a Halfords bike

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by MartinM, Apr 17, 2006.

  1. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>,
    MartinM ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Bennett wrote:
    >
    >> Lidl! Another false economy!

    >
    > actually I got a replacement last month (what goes around comes
    > around!)
    >
    > TBF the Lidl vice was an extreme Dangerous Brother moment; I'd bought a
    > brand new alloy frame off eBay (£10) which the seller had not realised
    > had a RH BB thread both sides(and he had 30 of them!) {1} . When I told
    > him he apologised profusely refunded me and sais scrap it so I thought
    > what the hell? and tried to re-tap the BB into the frame, when it got
    > too stiff I used the vice approach.
    >
    > {1} someone will probably come along in a moment and say that you can
    > actually get a BB that's threaded that way ;-(


    You can. Italian standard. Not uncommon - most Colnagos have them, for
    example.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    -- mens vacua in medio vacuo --
     


  2. mb

    mb Guest

    MartinM wrote:

    >
    > Simon Bennett wrote:
    >
    > > > {1} someone will probably come along in a moment and say that you
    > > > can actually get a BB that's threaded that way ;-(

    > >
    > > Um. That's an Italian BB. I've got one on the Merckx.

    >
    > well I had also tried to shorten the steerer tube so it would fit the
    > forks (by eye with a hacksaw!) so it was probably past saving anyway.
    > So an Italian BB is the same thread both sides? and the same pitch
    > etc? he did say it was a Raleigh frame even though it had no markings
    > whatever; perhaps they got a batch of them and it was easier to scrap
    > them than order new BB's.


    Not the same width, not sure about the pitch. I also don't think
    Raleigh made any frames with an Italian BB.

    --
    Mike
     
  3. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    mb wrote:

    > Not the same width, not sure about the pitch. I also don't think
    > Raleigh made any frames with an Italian BB.


    I raised this here at the time; it wasn't as simple as just buying a
    new BB: they were apparently faulty frames (they never re-appeared on
    eBay).

    Strange how such completely incompatible things can co-exist in a
    supposedly standardised (and probably all from the same factory in
    China) world.
     
  4. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    > MartinM wrote:
    >
    > > So on a sealed one you can clamp the tool onto the spline with a crank
    > > bolt? thanks, will try that next time. The last time I had a stiff one
    > > (fnaar fnaar) I rather lost it and hit the spanner with a large
    > > hammer; result, one splineless tool ;-(

    >
    > Or if a crank bolt doesn't suit, you can use a QR skewer & spacers through
    > a hollow-axle BB, or a Tacx tool that screws into the axle.


    in the Olde Dayes when I had a screw on freewheel I took the removal
    tool everywhere, hoping I would find a conveniently spaced drain cover
    if I ever I needed to use it. With a cassette it's just too much jollop
    to have to take with you. Haven't needed to change a spoke since then.
    I do often wonder how folk manage when many 100's of km's from a LBS.
     
  5. Paul - xxx

    Paul - xxx Guest

    MartinM came up with the following;:
    > Paul - xxx wrote:
    >
    >> Purrrlease ... 3 or 4 years is a good lifetime for any mountain bike
    >> bottom bracket, let alone one on a cheap, crap bike.

    >
    > £299 a cheap crap bike?


    Yup ... as your post seems to be at pains to point out.

    > it doesn't matter how long it lasted, if it can't be removed it's
    > useless;


    But in other posts you did remove it, so where's the problem? 3 or 4 years
    without maintenance is bloody good going for any bottom bracket, whatever
    the cost/make/origin.

    > how would you remove something with about 2mm of spline?


    Probably similar to how you did it, by bolting it up but I'd use my vice ...
    ;)

    > probably a good thing it wasn't sealed as otherwise I would not have
    > been able to get a bolt through it.


    Quite. You _did_ get it out so where was the problem?

    --
    Paul ...
    (8(|) Homer Rules ..... Doh !!!
     
  6. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Paul - xxx wrote:

    > Quite. You _did_ get it out so where was the problem?


    the part was not designed to be removed, or maintained, but to look
    good in the shop. Halfords did not want to know, on their own bike.
    That to me is the problem.
     
  7. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > You can. Italian standard. Not uncommon - most Colnagos have them, for
    > example.
    >


    Are you calling Colnagos common?

    JimP

    --
    Let's think the unthinkable, let's do the undoable, let's prepare to
    grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after
    all. - DNA
     
  8. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Richard richard at percival dot demon dot co dot tld for united kingdom

    >> Get a proper Record vice,

    >
    > I can second that recommendation for Record. After bending some
    > no-brand bolt-on vice, I bought a Record and, so far, it's taken
    > everything I've thrown at it.


    My Record vice has gone wobbly and the threaded rod has bent. Still works
    though!

    ~PB, never noticed the brand name before
     
  9. Paul - xxx

    Paul - xxx Guest

    MartinM came up with the following;:
    > Paul - xxx wrote:
    >
    >> Quite. You _did_ get it out so where was the problem?

    >
    > the part was not designed to be removed, or maintained,


    How do you know that? You appear simply to not know what you were dealing
    with. There are many different types of BB, you seem to have not come
    across this type before.

    > but to look
    > good in the shop. Halfords did not want to know, on their own bike.


    I thought you said it was a Carrerra? I don't think Halfords design and
    spec them (or do they?) but simply sell them. If you're expecting premium
    kit and service from a (mostly) car accessory outfit then you will probably
    find them somewhat lacking.

    > That to me is the problem.


    The problem also appears to be you.

    You've broken tools, vices and not known how to do the jobs you're setting
    out to do (acc. to your postings in this thread) and yet you still insist
    it's Halfords fault.


    --
    Paul ...
    (8(|) Homer Rules ..... Doh !!!
     
  10. Ib <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    > > If it's a decent frame, it's worth it. If not, not.
    > >

    >
    > Well it's certainly steel, because it rusts... Apart from that, it's a
    > Falcon 'Shane Sutton Special'. My tyres and tubes are 700C, but maybe I
    > just made them fit. My central heating engineer remarked he hadn't seen
    > one of them for a while - I don't know whether that is good or bad, but
    > turns out he once rode in the Commonwealth Games...
    >
    > Ib.



    He was a pro for the falcon team that competed in the Criteriums (such
    as the Kellogs series) that were Pro racing in the UK in the 80's.

    His brother Gary was also a Pro at the same time.

    Shane is now part of the GB coaching team, track sprinting in
    particular. You can see more buried on this page
    <http://www.britishcycling.org.uk/web/site/BC/gbr/EventReports2006/20060
    415_D3_M_Sprint.asp>


    As for the frame, I don't remeber them. Does it have any stickers
    indicating Reynolds tubing (531 for example)? If so, it might be worth a
    shot-blast and new coat of paint.


    --
    Andy Templeman <http://www.templeman.org.uk/>
     
  11. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    David Martin wrote:
    > Tony Raven wrote:
    >> Peter Clinch wrote:
    >>
    >>> So they replace the one manufactured from reject Brie with another made
    >>> from reject Brie... might as well put in something that at least aspires
    >>> to being merely adequate.
    >>>

    >> These Carbon-Helium-di-Einsteinium alloys are not all they are made out
    >> to be ;-)

    >
    > It's the selenium impurities. Very hard to get rid of. They are often
    > found with Phosphorus.
    >


    Tends to get eaten up by Molybdenum-Uranium-Selenium alloys if you're
    not careful


    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  12. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

  13. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    MartinM wrote:
    > Paul - xxx wrote:
    >
    >> Quite. You _did_ get it out so where was the problem?

    >
    > the part was not designed to be removed, or maintained, but to look
    > good in the shop. Halfords did not want to know, on their own bike.
    > That to me is the problem.
    >


    I'm not aware of any standards on what a bottom bracket should look
    like. The fact you assumed it was sealed and it wasn't was your
    mistake, not theirs. The fact it lasted four years is, as I and many
    others have said, pretty good. That a bike seller didn't want to know
    about a claim on a four year old component is totally unsurprising. I
    have other issues with Halfords but your experience is not one of them

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  14. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]


    >I appreciate that on this group anything that doesn't burn a hole in a
    >years salary is automatically classed as crap, > Bill
    >



    Au contraire, mon ami. What I think comes across is a dislike for bikes
    which are not fit-for-purpose being sold as fit-for-purpose, such as in too
    many a supermarket special made of lead piping with components of cheese,
    when sadly, the ignorant of cycling are lured into getting something which
    is not fit-for-purpse, as has been seen in many a past thread with parents
    ending up buying kids bikes that are too big, with brakes that can't be
    adjusted, etc., etc. and stuff that brakes quickly when it was not bought
    with the expectation that it would break quickly...

    There's also a love of a bargain and an appreciation of something that is
    high-end spec and is, indeed *lovely*

    But this does not equate to 'anything that doesn't burn a hole in a years
    salary is automatically classed as crap'

    Cheers, helen s
     
  15. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Paul - xxx wrote:

    > I thought you said it was a Carrerra? I don't think Halfords design and
    > spec them (or do they?) but simply sell them.


    Carrera is a Halfords brand, built by Merida IIRC

    If you're expecting premium
    > kit and service from a (mostly) car accessory outfit then you will probably
    > find them somewhat lacking.


    I'm sure Halfords are also one of the UK's biggest bike retailers; just
    because they sell car bits as well does not excuse them from a bit of
    after sales support.

    > You've broken tools, vices and not known how to do the jobs you're setting
    > out to do (acc. to your postings in this thread) and yet you still insist
    > it's Halfords fault.


    I've broken tools etc due to having a stuck part; I'll know better
    next time (I was trying to remove/fit parts from/to junked frames,
    where it would have been easier in hindsight to leave them). I'm sure
    many people have similar experiences. None of the other BB's I've
    removed have required the tool to be bolted on. I'm not blaming
    Halfords for not being able to remove this part or any part.

    I know several makes of BB; they are either sealed or non-sealed. I'm
    sure the non-sealed ones are all supposed to be adjustable. Thus the
    part that was fitted was IMO unsuitable. If anyone disagrees and thinks
    fair dos on Halfords then ignore my warning and go and buy a bike from
    them, simple.
     
  16. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    wafflycat wrote:
    >
    > But this does not equate to 'anything that doesn't burn a hole in a
    > years salary is automatically classed as crap'
    >


    Vide thread on Lidl/Aldi cycling stuff

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  17. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]


    > I appreciate that on this group anything that doesn't burn a hole in a
    > years salary is automatically classed as crap,


    is the wrong answer. Anything unlikely to make it to the end of the street
    before something breaks is classed as crap.

    You will often see the advice of 'look at buying second hand' given to those
    wanting budget cycling. This often has the advantage of getting a much
    better product for even less money than the £69.99 suppermarket special.

    > but why should I spend hundreds to pootle to work each day, and if it got
    > nicked, who cares,


    But, as sport's coaches are apt to say, form is temporary, class permenant.
    A good old bike is likely to be better than a crap new bike whatever the
    cost. If chosen well it will be more comfortable, more efficient and
    cheaper to run. All in all more smiles per mile.

    > doubt I would even report it to the police.


    You should -- even if they only give you an incident number. Firstly, it
    prevents them claiming 'crime down by x% ' when all that has happened is
    that crime has risen, the local chavs have lost any respect they may one
    have had for the law and everyone has given up reporting it and locks
    themselves in at sunset in fear of the boogymen.

    Secondly, plod can add it to his data base and see 'hotspots' -- I refain
    from using the term 'police inteligence' much loved of local plod as that is
    clearly oxymoron.

    Finally, one of my favourite bikes cost me £35 (on Delhi market and a shed
    load more to ship home). Its crap. It weighs as mcuh as a small lorry,
    handles like a pig, has virtual brakes that help you think you might be
    slowing down and a transmission with automatic, random gear changing and
    chain shedding. I keep it as a memento of a fantastic holiday and use it
    whenever I need to leave a bike at the station or similar on the grounds
    that no-one would nick such a pile of dingo's.

    It is, however, a comfortable ride and a very significantly better bike than
    the £69.99 rubbish that a friend asked me to help him service a few months
    back. Lighter, more agile, better speced.

    Servicing comprised taking it to the tip and leaving with a nice Raliegh of
    unknown age and providence that scrubbed up a treat.

    The choice is yours.

    T
     
  18. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    wafflycat wrote:
    > "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > >I appreciate that on this group anything that doesn't burn a hole in a
    > >years salary is automatically classed as crap, > Bill
    > >

    >
    >
    > Au contraire, mon ami. What I think comes across is a dislike for bikes
    > which are not fit-for-purpose being sold as fit-for-purpose, such as in too
    > many a supermarket special made of lead piping with components of cheese,
    > when sadly, the ignorant of cycling are lured into getting something which
    > is not fit-for-purpse, as has been seen in many a past thread with parents
    > ending up buying kids bikes that are too big, with brakes that can't be
    > adjusted, etc., etc. and stuff that brakes quickly when it was not bought
    > with the expectation that it would break quickly...
    >
    > There's also a love of a bargain and an appreciation of something that is
    > high-end spec and is, indeed *lovely*
    >
    > But this does not equate to 'anything that doesn't burn a hole in a years
    > salary is automatically classed as crap'


    I think that (and the refernces to Aldi/Lidl) is a very good and
    accurate synopsis of the general opinion on this group; especially the
    bit about being "fit for purpose" which is what I was trying to make
    the OP.
     
  19. Tom

    Tom Guest

  20. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

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