Setback seatpost or longer stem?



mikael17128

New Member
Aug 7, 2004
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I just got a new bike and find that I prefer bars with 135mm or less drop. It allows me to have a comfortable shifter grip and still be able to brake well when in the drops. I have always ridden on a zero offset seatpost and don't want to increase the stem length because I hear bikes can get twitchy! What are the pros and cons to a 20mm setback seatpost? Different muscles used between my bike #1 and bike #2? Other issues? Too much weight near the back of the bike (I hear that's a good thing though)?

Thanks in advance,

Mike W.
 

lks

New Member
Jul 29, 2006
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mikael17128 said:
I just got a new bike and find that I prefer bars with 135mm or less drop. It allows me to have a comfortable shifter grip and still be able to brake well when in the drops. I have always ridden on a zero offset seatpost and don't want to increase the stem length because I hear bikes can get twitchy! What are the pros and cons to a 20mm setback seatpost? Different muscles used between my bike #1 and bike #2? Other issues? Too much weight near the back of the bike (I hear that's a good thing though)?

Thanks in advance,

Mike W.
Unless you are very special, the front of your right knee should be vertically aligned with your pedal axis, when the right crank arm is horizontal and forward. Seat to bar drop and seat to bar reach, within reason, is personal. A horizontal back gives you lower wind resistance than an upright position. But you can't go faster and/or longer, than the position your body will tolerate. You select the components to achieve this.
 

alienator

Well-Known Member
Jun 10, 2004
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lks said:
Unless you are very special, the front of your right knee should be vertically aligned with your pedal axis, when the right crank arm is horizontal and forward. Seat to bar drop and seat to bar reach, within reason, is personal. A horizontal back gives you lower wind resistance than an upright position. But you can't go faster and/or longer, than the position your body will tolerate. You select the components to achieve this.


KOPS--knees over pedals--is only a starting point. There are quite a few people that have their knee forward or aft of the pedal spindle. That said, don't change saddle position to change your reach or your aerodynamics. If that's what you want to do, get a longer stem. Longer stems don't make bikes more twitchy.