Setting up suspension

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Squid-In-Traini, Jun 11, 2003.

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  1. Skareb Comp with preload/rebound. I have preload sorted, but what about rebound? How do I
    really know how much rebound damping to put on? Usually rooty conditions with mostly smoother
    legs in between.

    I have some knowledge of road motorcycle damping... does this apply here? Darsh any input?

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
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  2. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Skareb Comp with preload/rebound. I have preload sorted, but what about rebound? How do I really
    > know how much rebound damping to put on?
    Usually
    > rooty conditions with mostly smoother legs in between.
    >
    > I have some knowledge of road motorcycle damping... does this apply here? Darsh any input?
    >
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training

    Too much rebound damping: fork will blow through its travel on short stutter bumps - like lots of
    roots at speed. Not enough: pogo city. Right: somewhere in between - usually just enough so it won't
    blow through its travel, and then maybe a little more depending on personal preference.

    Jon Bond
     
  3. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Skareb Comp with preload/rebound. I have preload sorted, but what about rebound? How do I really
    > know how much rebound damping to put on?
    Usually
    > rooty conditions with mostly smoother legs in between.
    >
    > I have some knowledge of road motorcycle damping... does this apply here? Darsh any input?
    >
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training
    >
    >

    I've got the same forks. I'm damned if I can see a whole lot of effect adjusting the damping on
    these puppies. As the good Commander said, you don't want the rebound being too slow. Otherwise, it
    will compress 2 steps, rebound 1 step and then compress another 2 steps with each successive hit on
    those roots of yours. It ends up bottoming out before it's had a chance to extend between hits. Nor
    do you want it to extend so fast that you bounce up and down like a Jack-in-the-Box.

    I guess if you translate that, try less damping for a lot of fast hard hits like roots or rocks, and
    more damping for single, big hits. Try dropping off a kerb or rolling over some planks laid across a
    lawn to get a feel for what it's doing. The biggest difference for me with the damn things was
    putting a firm ride kit in them. But then I weight considerably more than you too.
    --
    Westie
     
  4. Jd

    Jd Guest

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Skareb Comp with preload/rebound. I have preload sorted, but what about rebound? How do I really
    > know how much rebound damping to put on? Usually rooty conditions with mostly smoother legs in
    > between.
    >
    > I have some knowledge of road motorcycle damping... does this apply here? Darsh any input?

    How much did you have to monkey with your motorcycle suspension to get it right? Experiment a bit
    and you'll find the right setup.

    JD
     
  5. Phil says:

    > Skareb Comp with preload/rebound. I have preload sorted, but what about rebound? How do I really
    > know how much rebound damping to put on? Usually rooty conditions with mostly smoother legs in
    > between.
    >

    I knew there was a reason I still rode something with no sus. I _do_ know what I'm missing.. ;-)

    Steve
     
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