Shameless bike porn

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Suzy Jackson, Aug 11, 2004.

  1. Suzy Jackson

    Suzy Jackson Guest

    Hi guys,

    Like all parents, I like to bore people to death with pictures of my
    babies. Here's a few of the one I'm doing at the moment (one of those
    awful bikes with gears).

    One of the head-lugs (the bottom one, if it matters):

    http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/audax_head_lug_1.jpg
    http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/audax_head_lug_2.jpg

    A nice shiny derailleur tab (made from stainless – this one won't be
    painted):

    http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/derailleur_tab_1.jpg
    http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/derailleur_tab_2.jpg

    A super close-up of the solder join between the chain-stay and
    stainless dropout:

    http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/HJ_solder.jpg

    Cheers,

    Suzy
     
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  2. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    Phoar! A tad too early in the morning for this kind of thing. ;)

    Superb attention to detail, Suzy, top work!
     
  3. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    Double Phoar! Shhhhhh! artist at work

    what's this one gonna be?
     
  4. suzyj

    suzyj New Member

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    It's going to be a sort of cross between a race bike and a touring bike. I call it my "Audax" bike, because it's main role will be long distance, fast rides, of 100+km (stuff like the Audax Alpine Classic etc).

    It uses Columbus Zona tubes, with much the same mix of lugs as I used on the track bike, but with Henry James stainless dropouts this time. The angles are 72.5 head and 73 seat, with 42cm chainstays. I've made up nice stainless rack eyelets, which I'll solder into the seat stays once they're done.

    I've bought a set of forks for it (45mm rake Look HSC3 plastic ones) and intend on using mainly Campy Chorus components (tho with a Phil Wood bottom bracket, as my experience with the Phil BB on my track/fixed bike has been very positive).

    It'll be a good few months before it's going, as I don't exactly work fast. It's _so_ much easier the second time around. I'm tempted to redo the track frame now, as I'm sure I'd do a much better job of it.

    Regards,

    Suzy
     
  5. geoffs

    geoffs New Member

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    Beautiful work Suzy, I am impressed.
    John Bosevski has offered to lets me use his equipment to build my own frame. I'll have to get my but into gear and do it.

    Cheers
     
  6. ritcho

    ritcho New Member

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    Now that is impressive - it was a great leap forward for me to collect things that other people had made and put them together. It is an entirely new level to make the things to put together. Sensational!

    Ritch
     
  7. Gags

    Gags Guest

    "Suzy Jackson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi guys,
    >
    > Like all parents, I like to bore people to death with pictures of my
    > babies. Here's a few of the one I'm doing at the moment (one of those
    > awful bikes with gears).
    >
    > One of the head-lugs (the bottom one, if it matters):
    >
    > http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/audax_head_lug_1.jpg
    > http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/audax_head_lug_2.jpg
    >
    > A nice shiny derailleur tab (made from stainless - this one won't be
    > painted):
    >
    > http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/derailleur_tab_1.jpg
    > http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/derailleur_tab_2.jpg
    >
    > A super close-up of the solder join between the chain-stay and
    > stainless dropout:
    >
    > http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/HJ_solder.jpg
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Suzy


    Suzy...that is pretty awesome.......how long did it take and where did you
    learn to solder up bike frames (ie. is there a course at TAFE or
    something??).

    Being an ex electronics technician and now an electronics engineer I can
    solder components to a circuit card but I have never had a crack at brazing
    (I assume that is how you are doing it).

    How do the total costs (excluding your time as obviously it is a labour of
    love) for a frame compare to buying one retail??

    Keep up the good work.

    Ride On,

    Gags
     
  8. suzyj

    suzyj New Member

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    It's not as hard as you'd think. I have had no formal training at brazing or soldering (except for a high reliability soft-soldering (electronics) course I did once as a tech). I pestered a welder here at work to show me the ropes, and read a lot (you'd be surprised at the amount of good stuff there is on the web) and other than that just use common sense. Soldering with silver solder is very similar to soldering with lead/tin. The only difference is the temperature and using a flame rather than a soldering iron. Just make sure everything is perfectly clean, fits together well (silver doesn't fill gaps), use heaps of flux, and heat carefully. Practice makes perfect. If you look at the solder joins on my first frame, they're nowhere near as neat as these ones.

    I wrote a bit of a blurb at http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/bike_frame.html about my experiences building my first frame (the pictures I posted in this thread are from my second) which I should probably update, but it says most of what needs to be said.

    I'm not very fast. I've been working on this one on-and-off for a few months in my spare time. The previous one took maybe four months all up. I like to savour the experience, get it just-so. It's a good thing I don't charge myself for my time, or else I'd never be able to afford it :)

    I thoroughly recommend you give it a go. It's not anywhere near as hard to do as you probably think it is, and you can get away with a surprisingly small set of tools, if you're patient. The tubes are fairly cheap, and the lugs and braze-ons similarly. The metal for this frame only cost me ~$300, and it's pretty high-zoot stuff. The one thing it does take though is time.

    Regards,

    Suzy
     
  9. GDS

    GDS Guest

    "Gags" <gags_44nospamatnospamtpg.com.au> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > "Suzy Jackson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hi guys,
    > >
    > > Like all parents, I like to bore people to death with pictures of my
    > > babies. Here's a few of the one I'm doing at the moment (one of those
    > > awful bikes with gears).
    > >
    > > One of the head-lugs (the bottom one, if it matters):
    > >
    > > http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/audax_head_lug_1.jpg
    > > http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/audax_head_lug_2.jpg
    > >
    > > A nice shiny derailleur tab (made from stainless - this one won't be
    > > painted):
    > >
    > > http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/derailleur_tab_1.jpg
    > > http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/derailleur_tab_2.jpg
    > >
    > > A super close-up of the solder join between the chain-stay and
    > > stainless dropout:
    > >
    > > http://www.atnf.csiro.au/~sjackson/frame/HJ_solder.jpg
    > >
    > > Cheers,
    > >
    > > Suzy

    >
    > Suzy...that is pretty awesome.......how long did it take and where did you
    > learn to solder up bike frames (ie. is there a course at TAFE or
    > something??).
    >
    > Being an ex electronics technician and now an electronics engineer I can
    > solder components to a circuit card but I have never had a crack at brazing
    > (I assume that is how you are doing it).
    >
    > How do the total costs (excluding your time as obviously it is a labour of
    > love) for a frame compare to buying one retail??
    >
    > Keep up the good work.
    >
    > Ride On,
    >
    > Gags
    >


    It's a pain in the arse Gags, just buy a frame.
    And yes it's just brazing, no biggie there, the hard part is the truing of the frame during the welding. If you're just
    a little out during the weld then the frame's rooted, de-solder (heat factor not included!) then start again. Way easier
    to purchase a frame from someone with a jig!

    G.
     
  10. In aus.bicycle on Sat, 14 Aug 2004 15:51:16 +0930
    GDS <[email protected]> wrote:
    > And yes it's just brazing, no biggie there, the hard part is the truing of the frame during the welding. If you're just
    > a little out during the weld then the frame's rooted, de-solder (heat factor not included!) then start again. Way easier
    > to purchase a frame from someone with a jig!
    >


    Don't need a jig, just need a sort of anal perfectionism and a lot of
    clamps...

    http://www.atnf.csiro.au/people/sjackson/bike_frame.html is the story I
    believe.

    Zebee
     
  11. suzyj

    suzyj New Member

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    GDS wrote:

    > It's a pain in the arse Gags, just buy a frame.
    > And yes it's just brazing, no biggie there, the hard part is the
    > truing of the frame during the welding. If you're just
    > a little out during the weld then the frame's rooted, de-solder
    > (heat factor not included!) then start again. Way easier
    > to purchase a frame from someone with a jig!

    Of course it's easier to buy a frame, but you're missing the point entirely. It's also easier to pay someone to ride the bloody thing for you!

    As for jigs, they're useful in a production environment to cut the setup time down, but they aren't necessary. If you're patient and careful, you can do a better (straighter) job using some simple clamps and bar stock than someone slapping the thing together with a jig.

    Framebuilding, list most any activity, is something where attention to detail, patience, and good old fashoined anal retentiveness go a long way.

    Regards,

    Suzy
     
  12. hippy

    hippy New Member

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    >suzyj wrote:
    >Framebuilding, list most any activity, is something where attention
    >to detail, patience, and good old fashoined anal retentiveness go a
    >long way.

    .. and that is why this little impatient black slacker duck wont be building
    frames any time soon! :)

    Awesome work as usual Suzy! You are a credit to DIY cyclists everywhere!

    hippy
     
  13. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    suzyj <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > It's also easier to pay someone to ride the bloody thing for
    > you!
    >


    And if anyone out there is lazy & rich enough that this idea appeals, then
    I'm willing to ride for you. I'm happy to give detailed ride reports, don't
    expect great speeds though :)

    Graeme
     
  14. suzyj

    suzyj New Member

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    Hippy wrote:

    > .. and that is why this little impatient black slacker duck wont be building
    > frames any time soon! :)

    But, but, I thought that wonderful file (angle grinder?) work on your fixed gear was the beginning of something wonderful (or is that something truly scary - not sure which)...

    > Awesome work as usual Suzy! You are a credit to DIY cyclists everywhere!

    Fankew.

    Regards,

    Suzy
     
  15. hippy

    hippy New Member

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    >suzyj
    >But, but, I thought that wonderful file (angle grinder?) work on your fixed >gear was the beginning of something wonderful (or is that something truly >scary - not sure which)...

    hehehe lol.. If you saw me operating that grinder with no concern for the
    poor frame being brutalised.. you would know "truly scary" is accurate :D

    Look.. I'll never say never (well, maybe.. s-o-m-e-times ;)) but in the near
    future I can't see myself being able to mess up a join more than 2 or 3 times
    before I throw the whole thing out for hard rubbish collection or something!

    I could handle woodwork because it was a slow process and you'd have
    to be truly "off" for a while for something to be totally ruined. With frame building I could see myself permanently ruining things.. quickly. :)

    I don't have a workbench anyway.. no bench = no vice = no fun ;)

    hippy :)
     
  16. On Mon, 16 Aug 2004 09:59:05 +1000, suzyj
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >GDS wrote:
    >
    >> It's a pain in the arse Gags, just buy a frame.
    >> And yes it's just brazing, no biggie there, the hard part is the
    >> truing of the frame during the welding. If you're just
    >> a little out during the weld then the frame's rooted, de-solder
    >> (heat factor not included!) then start again. Way easier
    >> to purchase a frame from someone with a jig!

    >
    >Of course it's easier to buy a frame, but you're missing the point
    >entirely. It's also easier to pay someone to ride the bloody thing for
    >you!
    >
    >As for jigs, they're useful in a production environment to cut the
    >setup time down, but they aren't necessary. If you're patient and
    >careful, you can do a better (straighter) job using some simple clamps
    >and bar stock than someone slapping the thing together with a jig.
    >
    >Framebuilding, list most any activity, is something where attention to
    >detail, patience, and good old fashoined anal retentiveness go a long
    >way.


    AOL!

    And it's so much more satisfying to ride something that you've built
    from the ground up. Not that I've ever built a bike frame, but sailing
    a boat that you've designed and built (my vice) is, I'm sure, the same
    sort of thrill.

    --
    Regards.
    Richard.
     
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