Shared path etiquette

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Russell, Feb 4, 2003.

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  1. Russell

    Russell Guest

    Sorry if this has been done before but..

    I normally avoid shared cycle/pedestrian lanes but there is one I use as the alternative road is
    horrendous at busy times. The thing is nobody really seems to know which side they should be on
    (there are no signs to indicate). So far it *mostly* seems if cyclists are passing each other, each
    stays to his/her left, but, if I'm passing pedestrians, they seem to expect to stay on their right
    so I do the same on my bike. Is there a general rule here I should know about? Oh and if I'm passing
    a dog walker, invariably the owner stays on one side and the dog on the other with the lead
    stretched firmly across, until I sprint upto 30mph that is:)

    thanks Russell
     
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  2. Marc

    Marc Guest

    Russell <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Is there a general rule here I should know about?

    Does it matter? Even if there is, it will be ignored by the pedestrians.
     
  3. John

    John Guest

    On Tue, 4 Feb 2003 23:59:29 +0000, [email protected] (Marc) wrote:

    >Russell <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Is there a general rule here I should know about?
    >
    >Does it matter? Even if there is, it will be ignored by the pedestrians.

    Just shout 'Banzai' and stick your elbows out.

    J
     
  4. "Russell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Sorry if this has been done before but..
    >
    > I normally avoid shared cycle/pedestrian lanes but there is one I use as
    the
    > alternative road is horrendous at busy times. The thing is nobody really seems to know which side
    > they should be on (there are no signs to
    indicate).

    On all shared-use paths, pedestrians have absolute right of way. They can walk anywhere, and
    cyclists /must/ be prepared to stop is necessary - even if the brain dead ped step sideways into the
    side of you, you are the responsible party (sound familiar). Highway code, rule 48

    Dogs are a different matter. They should at all times be under control on a short leash when on a
    pavement or path shared with cyclists. Highway Code rule 42.

    Those are the rules, but they are far more honoured in the breach than the observance.

    E
     
  5. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Russell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Sorry if this has been done before but..
    >
    > I normally avoid shared cycle/pedestrian lanes but there is one I use as
    the
    > alternative road is horrendous at busy times. The thing is nobody really seems to know which side
    > they should be on (there are no signs to
    indicate).
    > So far it *mostly* seems if cyclists are passing each other, each stays to his/her left, but, if
    > I'm passing pedestrians, they seem to expect to
    stay
    > on their right so I do the same on my bike. Is there a general rule here I should know about? Oh
    > and if I'm passing a dog walker, invariably the
    owner
    > stays on one side and the dog on the other with the lead stretched firmly across, until I sprint
    > upto 30mph that is:)

    Dunno. All ours are either well separated as here:
    http://www.btinternet.com/~simon.mason/J2.JPG

    or so wide as they are converted from railway lines that peds are no problem.
    http://www.btinternet.com/~simon.mason/J16.JPG

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  6. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

  7. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    John <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Just shout 'Banzai' and stick your elbows out.
    >

    Must try that with cyclists when I'm driving

    Tony

    http://www.raven-family.com

    "The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place" George
    Bernard Shaw.
     
  8. Eddie Dubourg wrote:
    > "Russell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> Sorry if this has been done before but..
    >>
    >> I normally avoid shared cycle/pedestrian lanes but there is one I use as the alternative road is
    >> horrendous at busy times. The thing is nobody really seems to know which side they should be on
    >> (there are no signs to indicate).
    >
    > On all shared-use paths, pedestrians have absolute right of way. They can walk anywhere, and
    > cyclists /must/ be prepared to stop is necessary - even if the brain dead ped step sideways into
    > the side of you, you are the responsible party (sound familiar). Highway code, rule 48

    It depends very much on the width of the path, but this generally means that it's not possible to
    keep up a reasonable constant speed when using these paths, and any desire to do more than
    trundle along will involve slowing down to a standstill pretty often, and then accelerating off.
    On wider straighter paths with less frequent access points, such as converted railways, river and
    canalside paths, then it's possible to keep going without having to slow almost to a stop every
    100 metres or so.

    A
     
  9. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

  10. Tony Raven wrote:
    > John <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> Just shout 'Banzai' and stick your elbows out.
    >>
    >
    > Must try that with cyclists when I'm driving
    >
    Don't forget to open your windows first: wouldn't like you to bruise your elbows now, would we.
     
  11. David Nutter

    David Nutter Guest

    John <[email protected]> said:
    > On Tue, 4 Feb 2003 23:59:29 +0000, [email protected] (Marc) wrote:
    >
    >>Russell <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is there a general rule here I should know about?
    >>
    >>Does it matter? Even if there is, it will be ignored by the pedestrians.
    >
    > Just shout 'Banzai' and stick your elbows out.

    Shouting "A thousand years" doesn't make much sense...after all no-one could ride a bike for
    that long :)

    Regards,

    -david
     
  12. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On Wed, 5 Feb 2003 15:33:17 +0000 (UTC), David Nutter <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John <[email protected]> said:
    >> On Tue, 4 Feb 2003 23:59:29 +0000, [email protected] (Marc) wrote:
    >>
    >>>Russell <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Is there a general rule here I should know about?
    >>>
    >>>Does it matter? Even if there is, it will be ignored by the pedestrians.
    >>
    >> Just shout 'Banzai' and stick your elbows out.
    >
    >Shouting "A thousand years" doesn't make much sense...after all no-one could ride a bike for
    >that long :)

    I suppose it means "I've been stuck behind this pedestrian for ages - it seems like at least a
    thousand years"

    Tim
    --

    fast and gripping, non pompous, glossy and credible.
     
  13. Graham Glen

    Graham Glen Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Russell <[email protected]> writes
    >Sorry if this has been done before but..
    >
    >I normally avoid shared cycle/pedestrian lanes but there is one I use as the alternative road is
    >horrendous at busy times. The thing is nobody really seems to know which side they should be on
    >(there are no signs to indicate). So far it *mostly* seems if cyclists are passing each other, each
    >stays to his/her left, but, if I'm passing pedestrians, they seem to expect to stay on their right
    >so I do the same on my bike. Is there a general rule here I should know about? Oh and if I'm
    >passing a dog walker, invariably the owner stays on one side and the dog on the other with the lead
    >stretched firmly across, until I sprint upto 30mph that is:)
    >

    I use a couple of stretches of Thames towpath on my commute, which are also used by a lot of
    runners, they always seem to run on the right hand side.

    Graham
    --
    Graham Glen
     
  14. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Russell wrote:
    > So far it *mostly* seems if cyclists are passing each other, each stays to his/her left, but, if
    > I'm passing pedestrians, they seem to expect to stay on their right so I do the same on my bike.

    We should all have learnt to walk on the right when on a road without a pavement (except when that
    would mean walking on the inside of the bend). Such habits die hard, so it's only natural to walk on
    the right when on a shared use path. It took me a while to get used to it as a cyclist, but now that
    I expect it I no longer find it a problem (BTW schoolkids usually seem to walk on the left - I guess
    kids today aren't taught how to walk safely along country roads).

    > Is there a general rule here I should know about? Oh and if I'm passing a dog walker, invariably
    > the owner stays on one side and the dog on the other with the lead stretched firmly across,

    Yup, that is a definite general rule :-(

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  15. Russell

    Russell Guest

    Danny Colyer <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Russell wrote:
    > > So far it *mostly* seems if cyclists are passing each other, each stays to his/her left, but, if
    > > I'm passing pedestrians, they seem to expect to stay on their right so I do the same on my bike.
    >
    > We should all have learnt to walk on the right when on a road without a pavement (except when that
    > would mean walking on the inside of the bend). Such habits die hard, so it's only natural to walk
    > on the right when on a shared use path. It took me a while to get used to it as a cyclist, but now
    > that I expect it I no longer find it a problem (BTW schoolkids usually seem to walk on the left -
    > I guess kids today aren't taught how to walk safely along country roads).
    >
    > > Is there a general rule here I should know about? Oh and if I'm passing a dog walker, invariably
    > > the owner stays on one side and the dog on the other with the lead stretched firmly across,
    >
    > Yup, that is a definite general rule :-(
    >
    > --
    > Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    > http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    > Thomas Paine
    >
    >

    Thanks Danny, that brings the total of sensible answers upto ..... 2! Russell
     
  16. Danny Colyer wrote:
    > Russell wrote:
    >> So far it *mostly* seems if cyclists are passing each other, each stays to his/her left, but, if
    >> I'm passing pedestrians, they seem to expect to stay on their right so I do the same on my bike.
    >
    > We should all have learnt to walk on the right when on a road without a pavement (except when that
    > would mean walking on the inside of the bend). Such habits die hard, so it's only natural to walk
    > on the right when on a shared use path. It took me a while to get used to it as a cyclist, but now
    > that I expect it I no longer find it a problem (BTW schoolkids usually seem to walk on the left -
    > I guess kids today aren't taught how to walk safely along country roads).
    >
    ISTR being told that large groups should walk on the left. Can't see why it makes a difference,
    maybe it's to do with large groups being unlikely to stop in the face of oncoming motor vehicles, so
    it makes more sense for them to be passed more like a bike would be.

    A
     
  17. "Ambrose Nankivell" <[email protected]> wrote: ( ISTR being told that large groups should walk on the
    left. Can't see why it ) makes a difference, maybe it's to do with large groups being unlikely to (
    stop in the face of oncoming motor vehicles, so it makes more sense for them ) to be passed more
    like a bike would be.

    Highway Code, rule 5, which also says carry lights.

    5 Organised walks. Groups of people should use a path if available; if one is not, they
    should keep to the left. Look-outs should be positioned at the front and back of the group,
    and they should wear fluorescent clothes in daylight and reflective clothes in the dark. At
    night, the look-out in front should carry a white light and the one at the back a red light.
    People on the outside of large groups should also carry lights and wear reflective clothing.

    A march is vehicular walking.
     
  18. Rory

    Rory Guest

    "Eddie Dubourg" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Russell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Sorry if this has been done before but..
    > >
    > > I normally avoid shared cycle/pedestrian lanes but there is one I use as
    > the
    > > alternative road is horrendous at busy times. The thing is nobody really seems to know which
    > > side they should be on (there are no signs to
    > indicate).
    >
    > On all shared-use paths, pedestrians have absolute right of way. They can walk anywhere, and
    > cyclists /must/ be prepared to stop is necessary - even if the brain dead ped step sideways into
    > the side of you, you are the responsible party (sound familiar). Highway code, rule 48

    A very sensible rule. Now, can we have that for shared-use roads as well?
     
  19. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On 7 Feb 2003 05:09:41 -0800, [email protected] (Rory) wrote:

    >> On all shared-use paths, pedestrians have absolute right of way.

    >A very sensible rule. Now, can we have that for shared-use roads as well?

    I think we already do.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
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