Shaved Legs (again) & crashes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jens Kurt Heyck, Jun 25, 2003.

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  1. After a big crash in a recent road race, I found that the lower part of my leg, which was shaven,
    sustained only a minor, razor-burn scrape. My unshaven thigh, on the other hand got about 12 inches
    of really nasty road rash.

    There are a few possible conclusions to draw from this:

    1) Shaving can reduce the severity of scrapes

    2) Some hitherto unknown natural law causes one to fall more heavily on parts of the body that have
    more hair.

    I lean toward conclusion #2. Ever notice how people usually fall on their asses? Now you know why.
    This is similar to the buttered bread and cat principles. (For a discussion of this, see:

    http://www.team.net/html_arc/chapman-era/199707/msg00001.html )

    We can take advantage of this "hair principle" by shaving hair from the most delicate, prized parts
    of our bodies and stimulating hair growth on the sturdier bits. Sheldon Brown, who knows more than
    the rest of us combined, has clearly embarked on this project already. Sheldon, are you applying
    Rogaine to the soles of your feet too?

    --j
     
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  2. John Rees

    John Rees Guest

    "Jens Kurt Heycke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]...
    >
    > After a big crash in a recent road race, I found that the lower part of my leg, which was shaven,
    > sustained only a minor, razor-burn scrape. My unshaven thigh, on the other hand got about 12
    > inches of really nasty road rash.
    >
    > There are a few possible conclusions to draw from this:
    >
    > 1) Shaving can reduce the severity of scrapes
    >
    > 2) Some hitherto unknown natural law causes one to fall more heavily on parts of the body that
    > have more hair.
    >
    > I lean toward conclusion #2. Ever notice how people usually fall on their asses? Now you know why.
    > This is similar to the buttered bread and cat principles. (For a discussion of this, see:
    >
    > http://www.team.net/html_arc/chapman-era/199707/msg00001.html )
    >
    > We can take advantage of this "hair principle" by shaving hair from the most delicate, prized
    > parts of our bodies and stimulating hair growth on the sturdier bits. Sheldon Brown, who knows
    > more than the rest of us combined, has clearly embarked on this project already. Sheldon, are you
    > applying Rogaine to the soles of your feet too?

    Well, the bottom can handle a lot more impact than the shoulder and collarbone. If I'm going down, I
    do whatever it takes to land on the cushiest part of my body. Fortunately for me, I haven't got any
    hair on my bum. I do shave my upper legs, even though it doesn't show. With some shorts, a few long
    hairs would poke through, and boy does that look gross! John Rees
     
  3. Appkiller

    Appkiller Guest

    What is this "buttered cat" prinicple? I've heard of greased pigs and tarred-n-feathered humans but
    buttered cats?

    Please elaborate.

    App
     
  4. On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 10:53:53 -0700, Appkiller did issue forth:

    > What is this "buttered cat" prinicple? I've heard of greased pigs and tarred-n-feathered humans
    > but buttered cats?
    >
    > Please elaborate.
    >
    > App

    It's a form of perpetual motion device. Since cats always land on their feet, and toast always lands
    butter-side down, all you need is some toast strapped to a cat's back, throw it off something, and
    it'll hover above the ground.

    The humming sound that people claim to have heard from some UFOs is actually due to the purring of
    several hundred tabbies that the aliens use in the buttered-cat array that powers their ship.

    Huw "I read it on the internet, it must be true" Pritchard
     
  5. Jp

    Jp Guest

    "Jens Kurt Heycke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<%[email protected]>...
    > After a big crash in a recent road race, I found that the lower part of my leg, which was shaven,
    > sustained only a minor, razor-burn scrape. My unshaven thigh, on the other hand got about 12
    > inches of really nasty road rash.
    >
    > There are a few possible conclusions to draw from this:
    >
    > 1) Shaving can reduce the severity of scrapes

    Shaving definitely reduces friction for massage, so it's not inconceivable that it might reduce
    friction with the pavement. But something has to slow you down. Maybe that's where your hairy thigh
    came into play.

    JP
     
  6. Andres Muro

    Andres Muro Guest

    The reason for the difference in the injury is clear. The shaved part was smooth and and slippery so
    it glided on the pavement. The unshaved part was rough and got caught on the pavement and caused all
    the damage.

    This is irrefutable empirical evidence in favor of shaving that nobody will be able to question.
    Haven't you seen Sheldon's new style, surely done for this same reason, I am now realizing.

    Andres

    "Jens Kurt Heycke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<%[email protected]>...
    > After a big crash in a recent road race, I found that the lower part of my leg, which was shaven,
    > sustained only a minor, razor-burn scrape. My unshaven thigh, on the other hand got about 12
    > inches of really nasty road rash.
    >
    > There are a few possible conclusions to draw from this:
    >
    > 1) Shaving can reduce the severity of scrapes
    >
    > 2) Some hitherto unknown natural law causes one to fall more heavily on parts of the body that
    > have more hair.
    >
    > I lean toward conclusion #2. Ever notice how people usually fall on their asses? Now you know why.
    > This is similar to the buttered bread and cat principles. (For a discussion of this, see:
    >
    > http://www.team.net/html_arc/chapman-era/199707/msg00001.html )
    >
    > We can take advantage of this "hair principle" by shaving hair from the most delicate, prized
    > parts of our bodies and stimulating hair growth on the sturdier bits. Sheldon Brown, who knows
    > more than the rest of us combined, has clearly embarked on this project already. Sheldon, are you
    > applying Rogaine to the soles of your feet too?
    >
    >
    > --j
     
  7. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

    Joined:
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    From www.raspberryroadrash.com -

    Coefficient of friction for hirsute appendage on chip seal: .25
    Coefficient of friction for shaved appendage on chip seal: .21

    Quod Erat Demonstrandum
     
  8. On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 14:52:21 +0000, Jens Kurt Heycke wrote:

    >
    > After a big crash in a recent road race, I found that the lower part of my leg, which was shaven,
    > sustained only a minor, razor-burn scrape. My unshaven thigh, on the other hand got about 12
    > inches of really nasty road rash.
    >
    > There are a few possible conclusions to draw from this:
    >
    > 1) Shaving can reduce the severity of scrapes
    >
    > 2) Some hitherto unknown natural law causes one to fall more heavily on parts of the body that
    > have more hair.

    Or, 3) people fall harder where more of their mass is concentrated. Thighs are more closely
    connected to the butt...

    In about 1972 I crashed badly, and still have scars from it. All right side. Knee, hip, forearm, and
    shoulder. Shaving would have impacted only the knee, and there minimally. If someone claims to shave
    in order to reduce injury, I want to see their shaved butt and hips. No, scratch that, I do not want
    to see that.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | There is always an easy solution to every human problem - neat, _`\(,_ | plausible, and
    wrong. --H.L. Mencken (_)/ (_) |
     
  9. "andres muro" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The reason for the difference in the injury is clear. The shaved part was smooth and and slippery
    > so it glided on the pavement. The unshaved part was rough and got caught on the pavement and
    > caused all the damage.
    >

    I thought slicks grip the road better than knobbly legs? Thus causing more friction? <grin>

    The Real Lee Casey
     
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