Sheila Taormina's wetsuit time

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Swanger, Sep 20, 2003.

  1. Swanger

    Swanger Guest

    Does anyone think that a wetsuit slows Sheila down, other than the extra time of having to take it
    off? What could possibly be the explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared her open
    water wetsuit times? What about her Olympic open water times? Obviously, that doesn't exist. So why
    does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster without one, especially when
    not having to take it off?

    Rick Swanger
     
    Tags:


  2. Drclean

    Drclean Guest

    "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > Does anyone think that a wetsuit slows Sheila down, other than the extra time of having to take it
    > off? What could possibly be the explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared her open
    > water wetsuit times?
    What
    > about her Olympic open water times? Obviously, that doesn't exist. So
    why
    > does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster
    without
    > one, especially when not having to take it off?
    >
    > Rick Swanger
    >
    >

    She turns and pushes off a lot in a pool. This both increases speed (if her turns are good) and
    gives a slight rest.
    --
    DrClean www.DrClean.co.uk The Best Fabric Cleaning Resource on the Web
     
  3. Colin Priest

    Colin Priest Guest

    one word: sponsorship

    "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > Does anyone think that a wetsuit slows Sheila down, other than the extra time of having to take it
    > off? What could possibly be the explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared her open
    > water wetsuit times?
    What
    > about her Olympic open water times? Obviously, that doesn't exist. So
    why
    > does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster
    without
    > one, especially when not having to take it off?
    >
    > Rick Swanger
     
  4. Swanger

    Swanger Guest

    "Colin Priest" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > one word: sponsorship
    >
    "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]... Does anyone think that a wetsuit slows Sheila
    down, other than the extra time of having to take it off? What could possibly be the explanation
    for her faster Olympic times when compared to her open water wetsuit times? What about her Olympic
    open water times? Obviously, that doesn't exist. So why does she swim in a wetsuit every time they
    are legal if she's faster without one, especially when not having to take it off?

    Rick Swanger

    "Colin Priest" <Colin [email protected]> wrote in message news:7fXab.113787
    [email protected]

    one word: sponsorship
     
  5. Aw

    Aw Guest

    "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]om>...
    > Does anyone think that a wetsuit slows Sheila down, other than the extra time of having to take it
    > off? What could possibly be the explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared her open
    > water wetsuit times?

    Sheila is no longer a swimmer; she's a triathlete. Her swim volume and workout quality has dropped
    significantly. She's probably reduced her training load by 50K per week, and it's probably a rare
    occurence when she exceeds her lactate threshold during a workout. Geez, she'd need a ski boat and
    tow rope to even come close to her old times. Also, it's almost impossible to compare open water
    times with pool times.

    > What about her Olympic open water times? Obviously, that doesn't exist. So why does she swim in
    > a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster without one, especially when not having to
    > take it off?
    >
    > Rick Swanger

    She's not faster without a wetsuit. Even in sprints with swims as short as 500m, she'd wear one. A
    decent elite triathlete will pick-up 5 to 10 seconds per 100m, and it only takes 15-20 seconds to
    remove the wet suit. If they wear their cycling clothes underneth the wet suit, they can save
    additional time.

    All swimmers are faster with wetsuits. There was an excellent study published in the Fall 2001
    edition of Journal of Swimming Research. Female collegiate swimmers wearing sleeveless wetsuits swam
    about 8 seconds per 100m faster than when they only wore swimsuits. If you're really that
    interested, let me know & I'll post the abstract.

    AW
     
  6. Subject: Sheila Taormina's wetsuit time From: "Swanger"

    >> So why
    does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster without one, especially when
    not having to take it off?<<

    Remember that Sheila was an Olympian in BOTH pool swimming (where she was a gold medalist on the 4 x
    200 free relay...swimming both prelims and finals) and in triathlon (open water swimming).

    She knows what makes her fastest.

    Larry Weisenthal

    Certitude is poison; curiosity is life
     
  7. "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > What could possibly be the explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared to her open
    > water wetsuit times?

    Um, perhaps her olympic times were the culmination of years of swim specific training which were
    designed to peak on race day? Perhaps she didn't train at the same time for biking and running while
    she was an olympic swimmer? Also might it be possible that in the olympics she could swim at 100.1%,
    knowing that she didn't have to hop out of the water and keep pace with world class cyclists? How
    'bout the possibility that there's no need for her to expend the energy gaining 60 seconds on the
    field only to have them form a peloton and swallow her up, leaving her in worse shape for the run
    than evryone else?

    Those would be my top 4 guesses.

    > So why does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster without one,
    > especially when not having to take it off?

    Because it's easier to swim just as fast as she needs to and leaves her with more energy for the
    rest of the race.

    Tom
     
  8. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Tom Henderson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > What could possibly be the explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared to her open
    > > water wetsuit times?
    >
    > Um, perhaps her olympic times were the culmination of years of swim specific training which were
    > designed to peak on race day? Perhaps she didn't train at the same time for biking and running
    > while she was an olympic swimmer? Also might it be possible that in the olympics she could swim at
    > 100.1%, knowing that she didn't have to hop out of the water and keep pace with world class
    > cyclists? How 'bout the possibility that there's no need for her to expend the energy gaining 60
    > seconds on the field only to have them form a peloton and swallow her up, leaving her in worse
    > shape for the run than evryone else?
    >
    > Those would be my top 4 guesses.
    >
    >
    > > So why does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster without one,
    > > especially when not having to take it off?
    >
    > Because it's easier to swim just as fast as she needs to and leaves her with more energy for the
    > rest of the race.
    >

    I don't know. My heart rate monitor always spikes when I'm taking off the wetsuit, and I go
    completely anaerobic. Taking it off is the toughest part of the race. It's not like taking the
    wetsuit off is less strenuous than swimming on a gold-medal Olympic relay team or anything
    :)

    --Harold Buck

    "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."

    - Homer J. Simpson
     
  9. Swanger

    Swanger Guest

    "AW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > She's not faster without a wetsuit. Even in sprints with swims as short as 500m, she'd wear one. A
    > decent elite triathlete will pick-up 5 to 10 seconds per 100m, and it only takes 15-20 seconds >
    > All swimmers
    are faster with wetsuits. There was an excellent study
    > published in the Fall 2001 edition of Journal of Swimming Research. Female collegiate swimmers
    > wearing sleeveless wetsuits swam about 8 seconds per 100m faster than when they only wore
    > swimsuits. If you're really that interested, let me know & I'll post the abstract.

    Thank you, I would very much appreciate you posting the abstract. We would really find this
    interesting.

    Rick Swanger
     
  10. Swanger wrote:
    > Thank you, I would very much appreciate you posting the abstract. We would really find this
    > interesting.

    Yes indeed. No need for bears and kayaks, right? :)

    Chief S.
     
  11. Swanger

    Swanger Guest

    "Chief Squawtendrawpet" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Swanger wrote:
    > > Thank you, I would very much appreciate you posting the abstract. We
    would
    > > really find this interesting.
    >
    > Yes indeed. No need for bears and kayaks, right? :)

    Oh boy, I certainly deserved that one! ;-/

    >
    > Chief S.
     
  12. Dakitty

    Dakitty Guest

    "AW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Does anyone think that a wetsuit slows Sheila down, other than the extra time of having to take
    > > it off? What could possibly be the explanation
    for
    > > her faster Olympic times when compared her open water wetsuit times?
    >
    > Sheila is no longer a swimmer; she's a triathlete. Her swim volume and workout quality has dropped
    > significantly. She's probably reduced her training load by 50K per week, and it's probably a rare
    > occurence when she exceeds her lactate threshold during a workout. Geez, she'd need a ski boat and
    > tow rope to even come close to her old times. ****Also, it's almost impossible to compare open
    > water times with pool times.*****

    Nod Nod. They're a different animal.
     
  13. Dakitty

    Dakitty Guest

    "Harold Buck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Tom Henderson
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > news:[email protected]:
    > >
    > > > What could possibly be the explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared to her open
    > > > water wetsuit times?
    > >
    > > Um, perhaps her olympic times were the culmination of years of swim specific training which were
    > > designed to peak on race day? Perhaps she didn't train at the same time for biking and running
    > > while she was an olympic swimmer? Also might it be possible that in the olympics she could swim
    > > at 100.1%, knowing that she didn't have to hop out of the water and keep pace with world class
    > > cyclists? How 'bout the possibility that there's no need for her to expend the energy gaining 60
    > > seconds on the field only to have them form a peloton and swallow her up, leaving her in worse
    > > shape for the run than evryone else?
    > >
    > > Those would be my top 4 guesses.
    > >
    > >
    > > > So why does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster without one,
    > > > especially when not having to take it off?
    > >
    > > Because it's easier to swim just as fast as she needs to and leaves her with more energy for the
    > > rest of the race.
    > >
    >
    >
    > I don't know. My heart rate monitor always spikes when I'm taking off the wetsuit, and I go
    > completely anaerobic. Taking it off is the toughest part of the race. It's not like taking the
    > wetsuit off is less strenuous than swimming on a gold-medal Olympic relay team or anything
    > :)

    That might be the blood pressure thing. If you have a nice tight wetsuit, when you take it off, your
    blood pressure tends to drop, which may make your heart-rate go up, just for the heart to keep up
    with the blood delivery. Similar can happen when jumping out of the water after a big swim, without
    warming down.
     
  14. Dakitty

    Dakitty Guest

    Oceans are typically colder than pools too. Heatloss is of concern. Isn't that what the wetsuits are
    meant for anyway? To minimize heatloss. Other than it being possibly dangerous during long exposure,
    it can also be detrimental to performance.

    "Colin Priest" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > one word: sponsorship
    >
    > "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]...
    > > Does anyone think that a wetsuit slows Sheila down, other than the extra time of having to take
    > > it off? What could possibly be the explanation
    for
    > > her faster Olympic times when compared her open water wetsuit times?
    > What
    > > about her Olympic open water times? Obviously, that doesn't exist. So
    > why
    > > does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster
    > without
    > > one, especially when not having to take it off?
    > >
    > > Rick Swanger
    > >
    >
     
  15. Dakitty

    Dakitty Guest

    "Tom Henderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > What could possibly be the explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared to her open
    > > water wetsuit times?
    >
    > Um, perhaps her olympic times were the culmination of years of swim specific training which were
    > designed to peak on race day? Perhaps she didn't train at the same time for biking and running
    > while she was an olympic swimmer? Also might it be possible that in the olympics she could swim at
    > 100.1%, knowing that she didn't have to hop out of the water and keep pace with world class
    > cyclists? How 'bout the possibility that there's no need for her to expend the energy gaining 60
    > seconds on the field only to have them form a peloton and swallow her up, leaving her in worse
    > shape for the run than evryone else?
    >
    > Those would be my top 4 guesses.
    >
    >
    > > So why does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster without one,
    > > especially when not having to take it off?
    >
    > Because it's easier to swim just as fast as she needs to and leaves her with more energy for the
    > rest of the race.
    >
    > Tom

    http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/0053.htm

    "....However, it hasn't been clear whether wetsuits actually help all types of swimmers. For
    example, topnotch swimmers might not need wet suits...."

    ".......Somewhat surprisingly, wetsuits didn't significantly improve performances among the
    international-calibre swimmers, who averaged about
    4:13 for 400 metres with or without a suit. However, wetsuits had an extremely positive impact on
    triathletes' performances, lowering 400-metre clocking from 5:05 to 4:46... "
     
  16. Tom Rodgers

    Tom Rodgers Guest

    Dear Folks:

    A properly fitted top-of-the-line wetsuit ALWAYS makes you faster, and it's my estimate that it does
    that by around 10%. For better swimmers like Sheila it SEEMS less because this gap is smaller for
    faster swimmers with better technique and faster times.

    Anyone who's ever done a triathlon knows how variable swim courses are, even if measured properly,
    and in fact swim courses are the least accurately measured of all triathlon events. Even if they are
    right on, wind, currents, water composition, temperature, start methods all affect time
    dramatically. Water is 1,000 times thicker than air, so even small variables can create large gaps.

    These gaps can easily become 10% or greater, negating gains in wetsuit swim times. But trust me, if
    Sheila had tried to swim without the wetsuit, her time would have been slower. Expert athletes are
    not prone to use gear unless it makes them faster, especially gear like a wetsuit which is less
    comfortable and more dehydrating.

    You just can't compare different swim courses, even the same course in the same body of water on
    different days. The day before Ironman Utah in 2002, the water was calm and fast and we all thought
    what an easy swim it would be. The next day, you had to wear goggles to walk to the start in the
    sandstorm, you could not hear the start cannon, the buoys blew away, and one mine died in the
    swells. "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Colin Priest" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > one word: sponsorship
    > >
    > "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]... Does anyone think that a wetsuit slows
    > Sheila down, other than the extra time of having to take it off? What could possibly be the
    > explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared to her open water wetsuit times?
    What
    > about her Olympic open water times? Obviously, that doesn't exist. So
    why
    > does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster
    without
    > one, especially when not having to take it off?
    >
    > Rick Swanger
    >
    > "Colin Priest" <Colin [email protected]> wrote in message
    news:7fXab.113787
    > [email protected]
    >
    > one word: sponsorship
    >
     
  17. Stp

    Stp Guest

    "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > Does anyone think that a wetsuit slows Sheila down, other than the extra time of having to take it
    > off? What could possibly be the explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared her open
    > water wetsuit times?
    What
    > about her Olympic open water times? Obviously, that doesn't exist. So
    why
    > does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster
    without
    > one, especially when not having to take it off?
    >
    > Rick Swanger
    >

    This thread is classic rec.sport.swimming - take something that is relatively simple, fail to look
    at all the variables and then answer the question using only your personal prejudices. But it is
    fun. Here is my 2 cents

    First - you can not compare a 200m swim in a pool with a 1.5k open water swim at the start of a
    triathlon. You can not even compare a pool 1500m with a open water swim of the same distance (if it
    actually is the same distance - check this out
    http://www.slowtwitch.com/mainheadings/opinion/distances.html. ) The (erroneous) premise here is
    that she is going "slower" in a completely different sort of race (ignoring the differences in
    distance, conditions, tactics and probably a dozen other things) and focusing on the wetsuit. Does
    the fact that on the 10 k run leg she is pacing significantly slower than her lifetime best 400m
    track time mean she has bad shoes? Or, is it because of the hills, the longer distance, and the fact
    she has already swam and biked?

    Second - why are you assuming she is actually swimming as fast as she can? Since drafting on the
    bike is legal in Olympic and international competition, it does her no virtually no good to crush
    everyone in the water. Tactically, she may actually be better off cruising (relatively) in the swim
    and coming out of the water more rested than her competitors. All she gets if she blows everyone
    away in the swim is the pleasure of riding alone while the girls behind her band together and bike
    faster while expending much less energy.

    Third - is she in the same swimming shape as in her Olympic days? Of course not. But, being world
    class in one of the 3 events gives her the advantage taking some of her swimming time and using it
    to work on her bike and run. See #2 above. IMHO, running fast is disproportionably beneficial in the
    Olympic Triathlon.

    Finally - whether a wetsuit makes a good swimmer faster or not in absolute terms may be open to some
    debate. For a world class swimmer, the added drag may negate any buoyancy benefit in shorter races.
    However, even for an elite swimmer, it definitely is easier in a wetsuit to swim a given pace over a
    long distance even if your ultimate top speed may be slightly slower.
    (i.e. if your absolute best time is X, it is easier to go 90% of X with a wetsuit then without one).
    So, in a triathlon where the swim is not a sprint and conservation of energy is more important
    than ultimate top speed, a wetsuit is a big advantage for everyone and not just someone who
    needs the buoyancy. (Why else would people who do this for money wear one in 75 degree water?)
    A wetsuit may even be a bigger advantage for a better swimmer since they may be able to be
    competitive with the less talented swimmers while expending much less energy thus effectively
    turning their triathlon into a duathalon.

    STP
     
  18. Aw

    Aw Guest

    > >...swimmers wearing sleeveless wetsuits swam about 8 seconds per 100m faster than when they only
    > >wore swimsuits.

    After re-reading the article, I find that I'm incorrect. The swimmers swam closer to 5 seconds
    faster. The abstract is posted below.

    The Effect of Wetuits on Swim Performance

    Kypros D. Nicolaou, Joseph M. Kozusko, Phillip Bishop The Journal of Swimming Research, vol 15:
    20-26, 2001

    Abstract

    The use of a wetsuit during the swim portion of triathlon has incresased in popularity over the past
    few years. The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of both the full-body and sleeveless
    wetsuits on 800m swim performance. Nine collegiate female swimmers swam three counterbalanced and
    randomized trials of 800m. Velocity, distance per stroke, swimming efficiency index, heart rate,
    ratings of perceived exertion, and perceived comfort were recorded for all trials, full-body
    wetsuit, sleeveless wetsuit, and swimsuits. No significant difference between the trials was found
    in distance per stroke, ratings of perceived exertion, heart rate, or swimming effeiciency index. No
    significance was found among three different comfort levels between the two wetsuits. Inhibition of
    kicking occurred in 50% of subjects with the full-body wetsuit and 27.7% with the sleeveless
    wetsuit. However, significant differences were found in velocity between both swimsuits (1.28
    +/-0.059 m/sec) and full-body wetsuits (1.31 +/-0.033 m/sec), and the sleveeless wetsuit (1.36
    +/-0.065 m/sec) and the full-body wetsuit (p <0.004). These results suggest that the use of a
    wetsuit compared to a swimsuit can increase velocity while maintaining a constant heart rate.
     
  19. Tom Rodgers

    Tom Rodgers Guest

    Dear Rick:

    While I try to avoid personal battles in forums and newsgroups, I did take the time to read that
    article. Newsgroup postings are not credited with the same level of authority and research as even
    dedicated forums, not to mention published studies.

    It does not surprise me, the results. I think I said in my response that great swimmers (whether
    they started as triathletes or Olympic-grade solo swimmers) are helped less by wetsuits than the
    more average multisport athlete. The article even explains why this is true: more water training for
    swimmers, different body composition, body position, etc.

    Also, note that the article was focused on transitioning the use of wetsuits FROM triathletes TO
    swimmers; i.e., to see if swimmers would also benefit like triathletes. But the purprose of
    rec.sport.triathlon and the original post was the effect on triathletes, including those that come
    from an Olympic-grade swim background. The three most indicative or Sheila Taormina, Barb Lindquist,
    but also Joanna Zeiger, who I believe was an Olympic team alternate at one point.

    I am engineer with NASA experience, and a licensed triathlon coach associated with Joe Friel's
    Ultrafit group (www.svi.net, www.ultrafit.com/associates.asp#rodgers). Though my experience is
    more with aerodynamics of cycling than hydrodynamics, the two are related: they both obey the laws
    and equations of fluid dynamics. I've been trained by Sheila on a couple of occasions, on a clinic
    tour and at the National Training Center in Clermont, Florida. Frankly, we could dispell a lot of
    the controversy just be asking Sheila why she wears a wetsuit (the Sydney Olympic swim comes to
    mind, where she ran away from everyone). I think that's more important than just about any study.
    Elite athletes tend to be 3-5 years ahead of the research. The best scientists and engineers can
    do is try to keep up with them and explain what they already intuitively know and have empirically
    proven in races.

    One thing about the study: a 400-meter test is pretty meaningless for triathlon, since the gains in
    wearing the suit are not much more than time it takes to remove in transition. Still, note that the
    triathletes were swimming 5:05 WITHOUT a wetsuit, which would put then in at least the top 3% of
    triathlete swimmers in the Ironman. A typical good age-grouper who can break an hour in Kona without
    a wetsuit would swim something more like 6:20 in intervals and maybe 5:50 in an all-out hard
    400-meter swim--that on a good day without too much biking or running the week before.

    And I think the test was done in a pool, and wetsuits are notoriously bad for doing flip turns,
    hard to "crease" the body, and hard to drive into the turn since your upper-body wants to stay
    above the water.

    I did say in my post that the advantage is LESS for stronger swimmers, first because statistically
    it's just less time either way, so less gap with the wetsuit. Also because elite swimmers (and you
    can make that "elite triathlon" or "elite Olympic) have better body position than the rest of us,
    and the primary advantage of the wetsuit is body position higher in the water. The so-called
    "cross-sectional" theory doesn't hold a lot of weight, because in fact the wetsuit holds in body fat
    so that its thickness does not add to cross-sectional drag, and in fact a smaller cross-section may
    result. This is definitely true of the pool-legal full-body suits used in the Olympics.

    The other factor not mentioned in the study is experience. A triathlete who regularly trains and
    races in a full-body wetsuit, whatever their previous experience, will receive more advantage than
    an Olympic swimmer who is trying one for the first time, or has only used one a couple of times in a
    "just for fun" triathlon or limited lab test. Again, the study does mention the significant
    differences in body types between swimmers and triathletes. Take a look at Sheila Taormina now,
    where she often gets second behind Barb Lindquist in ITU events, the way she looked for the Olympics
    after only three years in the sport, and the way she looked when she won her gold medal in 1996.
    Totally different body, bigger legs and hind section, more muscular all-around. Look at Barb
    Lindquist and compare her to other great swimmers: her body is just DIFFERENT.

    We can argue HOW MUCH a wetsuit will help, and I think it's different in every race. I'm about to do
    Ultraman in Kona, a 10,000 meter swim that exits Kailua and goes down the coast all the way to
    Keahou, and wetsuits are legal. Trust me: NO ONE will be swimming without one, including elite
    swimmers like John Nickels who set the record in 1999. No the degree of help will be different based
    on currents, swim talent, etc. Some swimmers, usually the elites, will select sleeveless even though
    THEORETICALLY full-sleeved is faster. Confidence and comfort is a factor. You can go to races in
    Germany where it's quite cold and still swimmers do the Ironman without a wetsuit, and I'll bet
    finish pretty well. But none of these will be in the pro ranks and none will likely win their age
    group, either. Germans are tough but smart ones appreciate technology.

    I doubt many ITU blazing swimmers have the time to read rec.sport.triathlon. So for the 99% of the
    rest of us, we need our wetsuits, and really should focus on selecting the right one, the right
    size, and learning how to use them. Definitely, upper-body strength is more important in longer
    open-water swims in a wetsuit. Weight training helps a lot more than in those just doing pool swims.

    I've been in the engineering debates with the best in the world: NASA, Lockheed, Boeing, Motorola,
    etc. In the end, people go with their gut feeling for better or worse. Sometimes the confidence and
    execution mean more than the testing and the theory. But I say again: all these great athletes who
    have access to the best coaching, testing, and want to win more than anything else would NOT be
    wearing wetsuits if they did not help, not by 10,000 to 1. Now if you want to search for tests for
    the fluke one in ten-thousand, you keep looking. I'll keep knocking out 400-meter intervals in the
    pool (including a few in my wetsuit in the colder outdoor 50-meter pool in September), while others
    keep reading studies. We'll see who races faster--and who learns more to help their coaching
    clients as well.

    "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Colin Priest" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > one word: sponsorship
    > >
    > "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]... Does anyone think that a wetsuit slows
    > Sheila down, other than the extra time of having to take it off? What could possibly be the
    > explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared to her open water wetsuit times?
    What
    > about her Olympic open water times? Obviously, that doesn't exist. So
    why
    > does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster
    without
    > one, especially when not having to take it off?
    >
    > Rick Swanger
    >
    > "Colin Priest" <Colin [email protected]> wrote in message
    news:7fXab.113787
    > [email protected]
    >
    > one word: sponsorship
    >
     
  20. Tom Rodgers

    Tom Rodgers Guest

    Heart rates and body temperature are definitely higher in a wetsuit, and then standing up to run to
    the transition area has the inevitable "orthostatic" heart-rate increase. My heart rate shoots up in
    every swim-to-bike transition, and since it's already five beats higher in the wetsuit even in cold
    water, that just makes it seem more "stressful." But again, it's worth the two minutes I gained in
    Olympic distance and the six minutes I gain in an Ironman. You have to practice that early bike
    segment where your HR is five beats higher than lactate-threshold even though your intended
    total-bike pace is LT for an Oympic distance even or 11-15 beats under LT for Ironman

    If your HR is still high after 15 minutes or so on the bike, something is wrong and you need to
    adjust hydration, nutrition, or lower pace utnil you come back to earth. If it's a 60-90 minute
    sprint event or you are an ITU star near two hours, you just keep on pushing and forget HR knowing
    that you it will all be over before you "crash" for anaerobic exhaustion--or so you hope.

    "DaKitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Harold Buck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, Tom Henderson
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > "Swanger" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > news:[email protected]:
    > > >
    > > > > What could possibly be the explanation for her faster Olympic times when compared to her
    > > > > open water wetsuit times?
    > > >
    > > > Um, perhaps her olympic times were the culmination of years of swim specific training which
    > > > were designed to peak on race day? Perhaps she didn't train at the same time for biking and
    > > > running while she was an olympic swimmer? Also might it be possible that in the olympics she
    > > > could swim at 100.1%, knowing that she didn't have to hop out of the water and keep pace with
    > > > world class cyclists? How 'bout the
    possibility
    > > > that there's no need for her to expend the energy gaining 60 seconds
    on
    > > > the field only to have them form a peloton and swallow her up, leaving her in worse shape for
    > > > the run than evryone else?
    > > >
    > > > Those would be my top 4 guesses.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > > So why does she swim in a wetsuit every time they are legal if she's faster without one,
    > > > > especially when not having to take it off?
    > > >
    > > > Because it's easier to swim just as fast as she needs to and leaves
    her
    > > > with more energy for the rest of the race.
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    > > I don't know. My heart rate monitor always spikes when I'm taking off the wetsuit, and I go
    > > completely anaerobic. Taking it off is the toughest part of the race. It's not like taking the
    > > wetsuit off is less strenuous than swimming on a gold-medal Olympic relay team or anything
    > > :)
    >
    > That might be the blood pressure thing. If you have a nice tight wetsuit, when you take it off,
    > your blood pressure tends to drop, which may make
    your
    > heart-rate go up, just for the heart to keep up with the blood delivery. Similar can happen when
    > jumping out of the water after a big swim, without warming down.
     
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