Sheldon Brown claims another victim: A Raleigh Twenty Saga

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Cheg, Feb 8, 2004.

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  1. Cheg

    Cheg Guest

    I have a new webpage about my modified Raleigh Twenty Folder. Thanks to all who gave advice and
    information.

    http://cheg01.home.comcast.net/r20.html

    It all cost somwhat less than a new Bike Friday (so far...). Enjoy.
     
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  2. Zeeexsixare

    Zeeexsixare Guest

    "cheg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s54...
    > I have a new webpage about my modified Raleigh Twenty Folder. Thanks to all who gave advice and
    > information.

    You need to show it folded.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  3. Jym Dyer

    Jym Dyer Guest

  4. Cheg

    Cheg Guest

  5. Cheg

    Cheg Guest

    "Jym Dyer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > http://cheg01.home.comcast.net/r20.html
    >
    > =v= Schweet! The coppery parts look really nice with the brown paint. Maybe you'll like the song
    > on this page (under the photo):
    >
    > http://www.pbase.com/image/23421365
    >
    > <_Jym_> (The guy who rides a red Bike Friday on the Greenway)

    The bronze colored rack was a random find at the local Recycled Cycles.I thought it would look nice.
    The only aesthetic change I'd make is the stem. I'm using an adjustable Kalloy stem. Sometime I may
    switch to a fixed stem in black now that I know where the bars need to be.

    That song is a riot. But since when do Twenty's qualify as "high end" folders?

    Chris (who rides a HotRod Twenty on the Interurban Rail Trail)
     
  6. On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 02:49:36 +0000, cheg wrote:

    > I have a new webpage about my modified Raleigh Twenty Folder. Thanks to all who gave advice and
    > information.
    >
    > http://cheg01.home.comcast.net/r20.html
    >
    > It all cost somwhat less than a new Bike Friday (so far...). Enjoy.

    It looks great but how does it ride ? Can you ride fast, and can you climb ?
     
  7. Cheg

    Cheg Guest

    "Jacques Moser" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:p[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 02:49:36 +0000, cheg wrote:
    >
    > > I have a new webpage about my modified Raleigh Twenty Folder.
    Thanks to
    > > all who gave advice and information.
    > >
    > > http://cheg01.home.comcast.net/r20.html
    > >
    > > It all cost somwhat less than a new Bike Friday (so far...).
    Enjoy.
    >
    > It looks great but how does it ride ? Can you ride fast, and can
    you climb
    > ?

    It's reasonably fast. Where I get an average of about 15 mph commuting over 33 miles round trip on
    my Raleigh International I get about 13 on the Raleigh Twenty, but that may go up as I get used to
    it. Climbing requires you to pay attention because the wheelbase is short and the front end is
    light. It is not as easy to ride as a full sized bike but it's certainly rideable. My longest day on
    it so far is 40 miles.

    In general it feels different from my road bike and mountain bike. It makes me want to try new
    routes and explore neighborhoods. Somehow it reminds me of when I was a kid knocking around on a 2
    speed kickback Stingray in Los Alamitos, CA, 1968.
     
  8. Russ Baxter

    Russ Baxter Guest

    "cheg" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s54>...
    > I have a new webpage about my modified Raleigh Twenty Folder. Thanks to all who gave advice and
    > information.
    >
    > http://cheg01.home.comcast.net/r20.html
    >
    > It all cost somwhat less than a new Bike Friday (so far...). Enjoy.

    Why did you install a suspension fork? A standard fork obviously weighs less and requires no
    maintenance.
     
  9. S O R N I

    S O R N I Guest

    Russ Baxter wrote:
    > "cheg" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<4zCVb.201268[email protected]_s54>...
    >> I have a new webpage about my modified Raleigh Twenty Folder. Thanks to all who gave advice and
    >> information.
    >>
    >> http://cheg01.home.comcast.net/r20.html
    >>
    >> It all cost somwhat less than a new Bike Friday (so far...). Enjoy.
    >
    > Why did you install a suspension fork? A standard fork obviously weighs less and requires no
    > maintenance.

    I can answer that! Because it's SUPER-MODIFIED!!!

    Bill "to quote Vandebaitor, 'DUH!'" S.
     
  10. Dane Jackson

    Dane Jackson Guest

    In rec.bicycles.misc cheg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have a new webpage about my modified Raleigh Twenty Folder. Thanks to all who gave advice and
    > information.

    > http://cheg01.home.comcast.net/r20.html

    > It all cost somwhat less than a new Bike Friday (so far...). Enjoy.

    Very, very cool. It definitely makes me want to go out and find one post-haste and fiddle with it.
    It looks like you did a great job, and I hope you have a lot of fun riding and modding it.

    Maybe I'll see you tooling around Seattle on it.

    ;-)

    --
    Dane Jackson - z u v e m b i @ u n i x b i g o t s . o r g Stuckness shouldn't be avoided. It's the
    psychic predecessor of all real understanding. An egoless acceptance of stuckness is a key to an
    understanding of all Quality, in mechanical work as in other endeavors. -- R. Pirsig, "Zen and the
    Art of Motorcycle Maintenance"
     
  11. >>http://cheg01.home.comcast.net/r20.html
    >>
    >>It all cost somwhat less than a new Bike Friday (so far...). Enjoy.
    >
    Russ Baxter asked:
    >
    > Why did you install a suspension fork? A standard fork obviously weighs less and requires no
    > maintenance.

    Actually, that's one of the best improvements you can make to a Raleigh Twenty, after upgrading the
    rims (and before upgrading the cranks.)

    The stock fork uses a rather unsatisfactory proprietary headset, with a nylon bushing in lieu of
    ball bearings at the top.

    In my experience, a BMX type fork improves the handling of a Twenty.

    The small wheels give a harsh ride with high pressure tires, so the suspension is particularly
    welcome in this application.

    Last, and probably best, this fork permits the use of a cantilever brake, a HUGE improvement over
    the looooooooooooong reach sidepulls that came standard on these bikes.

    Sheldon "Boing" Brown +------------------------------------------+
    | On Monday, when the sun is hot, | I wonder to myself a lot: | 'Now is it true, or is it not, |
    | 'That what is which and which is what?' | --A. A. Milne |
    +------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone 617-244-
    9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  12. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "Sheldon Brown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Actually, that's one of the best improvements you can make to a Raleigh Twenty, after upgrading
    > the rims (and before upgrading the cranks.)
    >
    > The stock fork uses a rather unsatisfactory proprietary headset, with a nylon bushing in lieu of
    > ball bearings at the top.
    >
    > In my experience, a BMX type fork improves the handling of a Twenty.
    >
    > The small wheels give a harsh ride with high pressure tires, so the suspension is particularly
    > welcome in this application.
    >
    > Last, and probably best, this fork permits the use of a cantilever brake, a HUGE improvement over
    > the looooooooooooong reach sidepulls that came standard on these bikes.

    Sheldon, you know there's laws against pushers?
     
  13. Cheg

    Cheg Guest

    "Russ Baxter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "cheg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]_s54>...
    > > I have a new webpage about my modified Raleigh Twenty Folder.
    Thanks
    > > to all who gave advice and information.
    > >
    > > http://cheg01.home.comcast.net/r20.html
    > >
    > > It all cost somwhat less than a new Bike Friday (so far...).
    Enjoy.
    >
    > Why did you install a suspension fork? A standard fork obviously weighs less and requires no
    > maintenance.

    Because Sheldon Told Me To when I forgot to wear my tinfoil hat...

    Actually, a 100 PSI tire on a 20 inch wheel doesn't have much give. In fact it feels like a
    Flintstones bike. The suspension fork was my second choice. What I really wanted was a carbon fork
    and a 20" wheel with a Pantour suspension hub, but that choice risked violating rule 2, that this
    bike had to cost less than a new Air Friday. The RST fork was inexpensive, even after getting the
    steerer threaded.

    It is heavier but I'm not sure that's bad since the front end is so light to begin with. The forward
    weight helps keep the rudder engaged while climbing hills.

    The down side of the RST fork is that it is about 2 inches longer than the stock fork, so the head
    angle is pretty slack now. There is some oversteer and it won't go with no hands. I could switch the
    rear wheel to a 451mm rim to steepen the angle (yet another tire size to worry about), or look into
    modifying the fork legs for less travel since I'm really not using it offroad. I haven't taken it
    apart yet to see how they are attached but there is a socket head bolt at the bottom and a preload
    adjustment dial at the top so it's probably not too complicated. Apparently it is easy to change out
    the springs and dampers so maybe ve just take it in a little.
     
  14. Cheg

    Cheg Guest

    "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Sheldon Brown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Actually, that's one of the best improvements you can make to a
    Raleigh
    > > Twenty, after upgrading the rims (and before upgrading the
    cranks.)
    > >
    > > The stock fork uses a rather unsatisfactory proprietary headset,
    with a
    > > nylon bushing in lieu of ball bearings at the top.
    > >
    > > In my experience, a BMX type fork improves the handling of a
    Twenty.
    > >
    > > The small wheels give a harsh ride with high pressure tires, so
    the
    > > suspension is particularly welcome in this application.
    > >
    > > Last, and probably best, this fork permits the use of a
    cantilever
    > > brake, a HUGE improvement over the looooooooooooong reach
    sidepulls that
    > > came standard on these bikes.
    >
    > Sheldon, you know there's laws against pushers?
    >
    >

    You will be assimilated.
     
  15. Cheg

    Cheg Guest

    "Dane Jackson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In rec.bicycles.misc cheg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > I have a new webpage about my modified Raleigh Twenty Folder.
    Thanks
    > > to all who gave advice and information.
    >
    > > http://cheg01.home.comcast.net/r20.html
    >
    > > It all cost somwhat less than a new Bike Friday (so far...).
    Enjoy.
    >
    > Very, very cool. It definitely makes me want to go out and find
    one
    > post-haste and fiddle with it. It looks like you did a great job,
    and
    > I hope you have a lot of fun riding and modding it.
    >
    > Maybe I'll see you tooling around Seattle on it.
    >
    >

    Maybe so. I mostly ride north of the ship canal and west of Lake Washington, and up in to the
    Mukilteo area. I considered taking ithe folder on the Chilly Hilly, but it sounds painful enough
    without the handicap. It's good for training though.
     
  16. Cheg

    Cheg Guest

    "Sheldon Brown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >>http://cheg01.home.comcast.net/r20.html
    >
    > The stock fork uses a rather unsatisfactory proprietary headset,
    with a
    > nylon bushing in lieu of ball bearings at the top.
    >

    The nylon bushing is dire. I was wondering when I took the Twenty apart, could the stock fork could
    be used with a regular threaded headset? Besides the odd compression slot in the steerer it appears
    to be a 1" OD, 7/8" ID tube.

    > In my experience, a BMX type fork improves the handling of a
    Twenty.
    >
    > The small wheels give a harsh ride with high pressure tires, so the suspension is particularly
    > welcome in this application.
    >
    > Last, and probably best, this fork permits the use of a cantilever brake, a HUGE improvement over
    > the looooooooooooong reach sidepulls
    that
    > came standard on these bikes.
    >

    The stock brakes are not too terrible. I still use the stock rear brake. The cantilevers are almost
    too good. I have to watch out for front wheel skids occasionally.
     
  17. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 02:49:36 GMT, "cheg" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message <[email protected]_s54>:

    >I have a new webpage about my modified Raleigh Twenty Folder. Thanks to all who gave advice and
    >information.

    Now this is one area where I really can't see eye to eye with the Great One. I used to ride on of
    those horrors when I was a kid - it was my sister's. It was totalled by the woman who came closest
    anybody has yet to killing me, in my worst-ever crash. There were two redeeming features of this
    crash: it paid for my new Dawes Galaxy and my sister got a Peugeot sports bike out of it.

    When I buy a folding bike it will be a Brompton.

    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at the University of Washington.
     
  18. Cheg

    Cheg Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 02:49:36 GMT, "cheg" <[email protected]>
    wrote
    > in message <[email protected]_s54>:
    >
    >> When I buy a folding bike it will be a Brompton.

    So sue me, I love gears. A three speed would be tough on Seattle hills.

    >
    > 88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at the University
    of Washington.

    85% of all statistics are made up on the spot.
     
  19. cheg <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in
    [Very approprate, given the OE linewrap mangling this suffered.]
    >>When I buy a folding bike it will be a Brompton.
    >So sue me, I love gears. A three speed would be tough on Seattle hills.

    As is well known, Britain is completely flat, which is why we do not require gears.

    [So get a six-speed Brommie - or fit a Mountain Drive, if you're feeling flush.]

    >>88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at the University of Washington.
    >85% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

    Er, yes. It is this saying that Guy is making a snide reference to; hence it is not necessary to
    repeat it.

    [But it's an 82-character line, tut tut.]
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
     
  20. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 23:21:29 GMT, "cheg" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message <[email protected]_s52>:

    >>> When I buy a folding bike it will be a Brompton.

    >So sue me, I love gears. A three speed would be tough on Seattle hills.

    So get a T6 and fit a Mountain Drive. You won't run out of gears on that!

    >> 88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at the University
    >of Washington.

    >85% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

    Ah, the 88% figure has a Special Significance though ;-)

    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at the University of Washington.
     
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