shift cable housing question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jeff Baron, Mar 23, 2003.

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  1. Jeff Baron

    Jeff Baron Guest

    local bike shops sell shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot and generic shift cable housing
    at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice the difference in shifting between
    shimano and generic. thanks, jeff baron
     
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  2. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Jeff Baron writes:

    > local bike shops sell Shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot and generic shift cable housing
    > at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice the difference in shifting
    > between Shimano and generic.

    With shift cables attached to the handlebar and closely spaced gears, length change of conventional
    control cable housing has caused problems for MTB's where large changes in shift-cable bend-radius
    occurs. I doubt that there is an advantage for road bicycles. Since it contains less steel (but is
    stiffer) it might be lighter.

    Don't overlook the following:

    http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8f.2.html

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "jeff baron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > local bike shops sell shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot and generic shift cable housing
    > at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice the difference in shifting
    > between shimano and generic.

    We use various house brands from our distributors, mostly made by CC Cable, in both 5mm and 4mm
    formats. No quality issues at all. Avoid plastic ferrules, though. Get the right size in metal.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  4. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > Jeff Baron writes:
    >
    > > local bike shops sell Shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot and generic shift cable
    > > housing at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice the difference in
    > > shifting between Shimano and generic.

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > With shift cables attached to the handlebar and closely spaced gears, length change of
    > conventional control cable housing has caused problems for MTB's where large changes in
    > shift-cable bend-radius occurs. I doubt that there is an advantage for road bicycles. Since it
    > contains less steel (but is stiffer) it might be lighter.
    >
    > Don't overlook the following:
    >
    > http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8f.2.html

    Jobst, I did not understand that at all. "contains less steel"?? Which one? Shimano gear casing or
    CC gear casing?

    I use both Shimano gear casing and CC Cable gear casing ( and Campagnolo gear casing too!) I use a
    lot of it in all three brands.

    I don't believe there is any more or less steel in any brand of gear casing currently produced.

    As a matter of fact, I bet you could not tell a length of Shimano gear casing from a length of CC
    Cable brand gear casing once you cut out the section with the name hot-stamped in. (Campagnolo is
    very slightly thinner OD).

    I just cut open a piece of each brand and the strands are the same size (.5mm) and the strand count
    (19) is identical.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  5. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Andrew Muzi writes:

    >>> local bike shops sell Shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot and generic shift cable
    >>> housing at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice the difference in
    >>> shifting between Shimano and generic.

    >> With shift cables attached to the handlebar and closely spaced gears, length change of
    >> conventional control cable housing has caused problems for MTB's where large changes in
    >> shift-cable bend-radius occurs. I doubt that there is an advantage for road bicycles. Since it
    >> contains less steel (but is stiffer) it might be lighter.

    >> Don't overlook the following:

    >> http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8f.2.html

    > Jobst, I did not understand that at all. "contains less steel"?? Which one? Shimano gear casing or
    > CC gear casing?

    The FAQ item explains that the SIS shift cable housing has low helix stainless wires instead of
    being a steel coil, conventional in Bowden control cables. The SIS cable housing is mainly plastic
    with longitudinal wires with a helix similar to that of the cable. Cables must be wound in a helix
    or the outside strands would fail under load because they take a longer path. The helix makes all
    strands pass through inside and outside of bends, maintaining constant length and stress. The SIS
    housing does the same.

    > I use both Shimano gear casing and CC Cable gear casing ( and Campagnolo gear casing too!) I use a
    > lot of it in all three brands.

    > I don't believe there is any more or less steel in any brand of gear casing currently produced.

    If you review the FAQ item, I think it will clarify the issue.

    > As a matter of fact, I bet you could not tell a length of Shimano gear casing from a length of CC
    > Cable brand gear casing once you cut out the section with the name hot-stamped in. (Campagnolo is
    > very slightly thinner OD).

    I don't know what a CC cable is.

    > I just cut open a piece of each brand and the strands are the same size (.5mm) and the strand
    > count (19) is identical.

    Well! A brake cable housing has only one strand that is wound circularly about a mandrel. It is
    solid steel, the better ones are made of rectangular (trapezoidal when straight) wire.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  6. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    A reader asked:
    > >>> local bike shops sell Shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot and generic shift cable
    > >>> housing at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice the difference in
    > >>> shifting between Shimano and generic.

    And Jobst responded:
    > >> With shift cables attached to the handlebar and closely spaced gears, length change of
    > >> conventional control cable housing has caused problems for MTB's where large changes in
    > >> shift-cable bend-radius occurs. I doubt that there is an advantage for road bicycles. Since it
    > >> contains less steel (but is stiffer) it might be lighter.
    >
    > >> Don't overlook the following:
    >
    > >> http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8f.2.html

    I ([email protected]) penned:
    > > Jobst, I did not understand that at all. "contains less steel"?? Which one? Shimano gear casing
    > > or CC gear casing?

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > The FAQ item explains that the SIS shift cable housing has low helix stainless wires instead of
    > being a steel coil, conventional in Bowden control cables. The SIS cable housing is mainly plastic
    > with longitudinal wires with a helix similar to that of the cable. Cables must be wound in a helix
    > or the outside strands would fail under load because they take a longer path. The helix makes all
    > strands pass through inside and outside of bends, maintaining constant length and stress. The SIS
    > housing does the same.

    (am)> > I use both Shimano gear casing and CC Cable gear casing ( and Campagnolo
    > > gear casing too!) I use a lot of it in all three brands.

    > > I don't believe there is any more or less steel in any brand of gear
    casing
    > > currently produced.

    (jb)> If you review the FAQ item, I think it will clarify the issue.

    (am)> > As a matter of fact, I bet you could not tell a length of Shimano
    > > gear casing from a length of CC Cable brand gear casing once you cut out the section with the
    > > name hot-stamped in. (Campagnolo is very slightly thinner OD).

    (jb)> I don't know what a CC cable is.

    (am)> > I just cut open a piece of each brand and the strands are the same size
    > > (.5mm) and the strand count (19) is identical.

    (jb)> Well! A brake cable housing has only one strand that is wound
    > circularly about a mandrel. It is solid steel, the better ones are made of rectangular
    > (trapezoidal when straight) wire.

    Ahhh, We have spoken past each other. I was replying to the question about Shimano vs. "generic"
    gear casing. You were talking about the difference between gear casing and brake casing, an
    important thing but tangetial here.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  7. Richard Chan

    Richard Chan Guest

    jeff baron <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > local bike shops sell shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot and generic shift cable housing
    > at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice the difference in shifting
    > between shimano and generic. thanks, jeff baron

    $4.5/foot is too much from any MFG. Try Ashman's. I had really good prices from them on original
    Shimano SIS, brake and inner stainless cables. They are black (housing with silver lettering) if you
    don't mind.
     
  8. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "jeff baron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > local bike shops sell shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot
    and
    > > generic shift cable housing at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice the
    > > difference in shifting between shimano
    and
    > > generic.
    >
    >
    > We use various house brands from our distributors, mostly made by CC
    Cable,
    > in both 5mm and 4mm formats. No quality issues at all. Avoid plastic ferrules, though. Get the
    > right size in metal.

    Andrew: why avoid plastic ferrules. Isn't that the pre-packaged standard for Campagnolo? --
    Jay Beattie.
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Jay Beattie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >"A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> "jeff baron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> > local bike shops sell shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot
    >and
    >> > generic shift cable housing at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice
    >> > the difference in shifting between shimano
    >and
    >> > generic.
    >>
    >>
    >> We use various house brands from our distributors, mostly made by CC
    >Cable,
    >> in both 5mm and 4mm formats. No quality issues at all. Avoid plastic ferrules, though. Get the
    >> right size in metal.
    >
    >Andrew: why avoid plastic ferrules. Isn't that the pre-packaged standard for Campagnolo? --
    >Jay Beattie.

    I don't know Andy's reason but my reason is that the longitudinal steel strands in the housing can
    push through the plastic cap. That almost never happens with steel end-caps; you do see it from time
    to time with the plastic ones.

    --Paul
     
  10. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > "jeff baron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > local bike shops sell shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot
    > and
    > > > generic shift cable housing at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice
    > > > the difference in shifting between shimano
    > and
    > > > generic.

    > "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > We use various house brands from our distributors, mostly made by CC
    > Cable,
    > > in both 5mm and 4mm formats. No quality issues at all. Avoid plastic ferrules, though. Get the
    > > right size in metal.

    "Jay Beattie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Andrew: why avoid plastic ferrules. Isn't that the pre-packaged standard for Campagnolo? -- Jay
    > Beattie.

    We commonly replace splayed pastic ferrules. I suppose if they fit well they should work fine. But
    when they are cocked in a slightly-large cable stop they split open. Campagnolo plastic ferrules??
    I'm building with Campagnolo cable sets with all-metal ferule assortments. Sure you didn't mean
    Shimano plastic ferrules?

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  11. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > >> "jeff baron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> > local bike shops sell shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot
    > >and
    > >> > generic shift cable housing at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice
    > >> > the difference in shifting between shimano
    > >and
    > >> > generic.

    > >"A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> We use various house brands from our distributors, mostly made by CC
    > >Cable,
    > >> in both 5mm and 4mm formats. No quality issues at all. Avoid plastic ferrules, though. Get the
    > >> right size in metal.

    > In article <[email protected]>, Jay Beattie <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >Andrew: why avoid plastic ferrules. Isn't that the pre-packaged standard for Campagnolo? -- Jay
    > >Beattie.

    "Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:qiOfa.33858$A%[email protected]...
    > I don't know Andy's reason but my reason is that the longitudinal steel strands in the housing can
    > push through the plastic cap. That almost never happens with steel end-caps; you do see it from
    > time to time with the plastic ones.

    I agree. Why do the job over to replace a split or pierced plastic ferrule when you could have done
    it _once_ in metal?

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  12. jeff-<< local bike shops sell shimano sis shift cable housing at $4.5/foot and generic shift cable
    housing at $1.5/foot. much appreciate advice on whether one would notice the difference in shifting
    between shimano and generic

    If both lined, use the cheaper stuff...like chains, the least expensive compatible stuff..

    The more expensive stuff will not work any better particularly if the generic stuff is 5mm rather
    than the really dopey 4mm shimano stuff...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  13. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > jay-<< Andrew: why avoid plastic ferrules. Isn't that the
    pre-packaged
    > standard for Campagnolo? -
    >
    > Campagnolo uses and supplies steel ferrules, shimano uses plastic with
    their
    > 4mm der housing-
    >
    > steel es better-

    No dis to Campy intended. I got some Sachs Ergo 7/8 levers for my tandem about 10 years ago. They
    were bundled with Campy cables with plastic ends. I guess this is not the standard. -- Jay Beattie.
     
  14. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > jay-<< Andrew: why avoid plastic ferrules. Isn't that the
    > pre-packaged
    > > standard for Campagnolo? -

    > "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Campagnolo uses and supplies steel ferrules, shimano uses plastic with
    > their
    > > 4mm der housing- steel es better-

    "Jay Beattie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > No dis to Campy intended. I got some Sachs Ergo 7/8 levers for my tandem about 10 years ago. They
    > were bundled with Campy cables with plastic ends. I guess this is not the standard. -- Jay
    > Beattie.

    Those casings were hot-stamped "Sachs". It was standard, _their_ standard, not Campagnolo's. SRAM
    still supplies plastic ferrules on oem casings.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  15. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > jay-<< Andrew: why avoid plastic ferrules. Isn't that the
    > > pre-packaged
    > > > standard for Campagnolo? -
    >
    > > "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Campagnolo uses and supplies steel ferrules, shimano uses plastic
    with
    > > their
    > > > 4mm der housing- steel es better-
    >
    >
    > "Jay Beattie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > No dis to Campy intended. I got some Sachs Ergo 7/8 levers for my
    tandem
    > > about 10 years ago. They were bundled with Campy cables with
    plastic
    > > ends. I guess this is not the standard. -- Jay Beattie.
    >
    >
    > Those casings were hot-stamped "Sachs". It was standard, _their_
    standard,
    > not Campagnolo's. SRAM still supplies plastic ferrules on oem casings.

    Actually, Andrew, I recall that they had a very nice gold script "Campagnolo" on them. They were
    black. I installed them on another bike, but I think they are still around. I'll take a look. --
    Jay Beattie.
     
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