Shimano Deore disk v. Avid Arch Rivals

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Bob, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. Bob

    Bob Guest

    I'm thinking of replacing my Avid Arch Rival front brake with a 2001 Shimano Deore Disk to hopefully
    get me more stopping power during my winter rides. It's not too expensive -- about $110 including
    wheel. Can anyone comment on the Deore disk brakes versus a V-brake like the Arch Rival?

    Thanks,

    Bob
     
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  2. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On Wed, 11 Dec 2002 06:09:34 -0500, "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm thinking of replacing my Avid Arch Rival front brake with a 2001 Shimano Deore Disk to
    >hopefully get me more stopping power during my winter rides. It's not too expensive -- about $110
    >including wheel. Can anyone comment on the Deore disk brakes versus a V-brake like the Arch Rival?
    >
    >Thanks,
    >
    >Bob
    >
    You'll probably do better with the discs.

    The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind should give
    an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I'm thinking of replacing my Avid Arch Rival front brake with a 2001 Shimano Deore Disk to
    > hopefully get me more stopping power during my winter rides. It's not too expensive -- about $110
    > including wheel. Can anyone comment on the Deore disk brakes versus a V-brake like the Arch Rival?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >
    >

    Mechanical or hydraulic?
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  4. Jan Sacharuk

    Jan Sacharuk Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Bob wrote:
    > I'm thinking of replacing my Avid Arch Rival front brake with a 2001 Shimano Deore Disk to
    > hopefully get me more stopping power during my winter rides. It's not too expensive -- about $110
    > including wheel. Can anyone comment on the Deore disk brakes versus a V-brake like the Arch Rival?

    Especially in the winter, disc brakes - any disc brakes - can't be beat. Go with the Deores.

    JS

    --
    ========================= [email protected] ========================
    Jan Sacharuk Member in Good Standing of The Discordian Solidarity Turn on viewing of the X-Geek-Code
    header to see my Geek Code
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    Triangle Man, Triangle Man, Triangle Man hates Particle Man,
    They have a fight, Triangle wins, Triangle man.
    - Particle Man, They might be Giants
     
  5. Bob

    Bob Guest

    "Jan Sacharuk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Bob wrote:
    > > I'm thinking of replacing my Avid Arch Rival front brake with a 2001
    Shimano
    > > Deore Disk to hopefully get me more stopping power during my winter
    rides.
    > > It's not too expensive -- about $110 including wheel. Can anyone
    comment on
    > > the Deore disk brakes versus a V-brake like the Arch Rival?
    >
    > Especially in the winter, disc brakes - any disc brakes - can't be beat. Go with the Deores.
    >
    > JS
    >

    That's what I was thinking too. Plus, it might be better for those rainy times. I try not to ride in
    the rain, but every once in a while I get caught out in the rain.
     
  6. Bob

    Bob Guest

    "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Chris Phillipo <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > > I'm thinking of replacing my Avid Arch Rival front brake with a 2001
    > Shimano
    > > > Deore Disk to hopefully get me more stopping power during my winter
    > rides.
    > > > It's not too expensive -- about $110 including wheel. Can anyone
    > comment on
    > > > the Deore disk brakes versus a V-brake like the Arch Rival?
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > >
    > > > Bob
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > > Mechanical or hydraulic?
    >
    > I was under the impression the Deores were all mech discs - may be wrong though....(first time for
    > everything..).....
    >
    > Shaun aRe
    >
    >
    >
    >

    These particular ones are mechanic. Ideally, I'd go hydraulic, but the bike I have is older, and I'm
    trying to increase braking without spending too much. The bike isn't worth it, really. If I decide
    to go fully suspended, then I'll go hydraulic on whatever bike I end up buying.

    Thanks for the help!

    --
    Bob ctviggen at rcn dot com
     
  7. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Bob <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...

    > > > Mechanical or hydraulic?
    > >
    > > I was under the impression the Deores were all mech discs - may be wrong though....(first time
    > > for everything..).....
    > >
    > > Shaun aRe
    >
    > These particular ones are mechanic. Ideally, I'd go hydraulic, but the
    bike
    > I have is older, and I'm trying to increase braking without spending too much. The bike isn't
    > worth it, really. If I decide to go fully
    suspended,
    > then I'll go hydraulic on whatever bike I end up buying.
    >
    > Thanks for the help!

    A mate of mine has Deore mech disks, and isn't happy with them. He's tried several makes of pad, but
    he either gets reduced braking power, or lack of modulation. I gave them a quick try, and wasn't
    keen either, although I'd still rather have them that V's.

    Shaun aRe
     
  8. Westridge

    Westridge Guest

    "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm thinking of replacing my Avid Arch Rival front brake with a 2001
    Shimano
    > Deore Disk to hopefully get me more stopping power during my winter rides. It's not too expensive
    > -- about $110 including wheel. Can anyone comment
    on
    > the Deore disk brakes versus a V-brake like the Arch Rival?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >

    I've got Shimano Deore mech disks on my NRS2. While the SHIMANO disks haven't been a problem
    themselves, mech disks in general have been. Oil, any amount of oil, on the rotors is a pain in the
    arse - and you gotta clean the rear cassette occasionally! V's are superior in that respect - so
    much easier to fix that little problem. The rear cable routing is a pain in the arse. OK, so that's
    more of a bike related issue, but there's a lot of friction in the cables and as a consequence the
    rear brake is hard to use and difficult to adjust. Where the cable drops off the frame and goes
    along the suspensed seat stay the cable has too much looping and play and thus friction. The cable
    housing fills with grit too easily too. Other than _that_ they're great when they're working well. I
    enjoy them. Just don't spend your life's savings on getting them because I'm dubious of the bang
    you'll get for your buck with mechanical disks. Hydralic might (hopefully) be different....

    Westie
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I'm thinking of replacing my Avid Arch Rival front brake with a 2001
    > Shimano
    > > Deore Disk to hopefully get me more stopping power during my winter rides. It's not too
    > > expensive -- about $110 including wheel. Can anyone comment
    > on
    > > the Deore disk brakes versus a V-brake like the Arch Rival?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Bob
    > >
    > >
    >
    > I've got Shimano Deore mech disks on my NRS2. While the SHIMANO disks haven't been a problem
    > themselves, mech disks in general have been. Oil, any amount of oil, on the rotors is a pain in
    > the arse - and you gotta clean the rear cassette occasionally! V's are superior in that respect -
    > so much easier to fix that little problem.

    The cassette is on the opposite side of the wheel, you know :)

    > The rear cable routing is a pain in the arse. OK, so that's more of a bike related issue, but
    > there's a lot of friction in the cables and as a consequence the rear brake is hard to use and
    > difficult to adjust. Where the cable drops off the frame and goes along the suspensed seat stay
    > the cable has too much looping and play and thus friction. The cable housing fills with grit too
    > easily too.

    Whenever I install a cable disc I go for the extra couple of bucks for Shimano SLR/XTR cable
    housing which doesn't compress easily and a teflon coated brake cable. Then I put some thought into
    how to route the housing the in the shortest and straightest path possible while still allowing
    suspension movement.

    I like the Avid mechanicals but the Deore hydraulic are cheaper than Avids and require virtually no
    maintenance or adjustment. So, there are really only two reasons to buy Avids; you have brake/shift
    lever combos you can't break up or you are afraid of installing and bleeding hydraulic brakes
    yourself. (and I'm telling you people, it's EASIER than messing with cables)
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  10. Jan Sacharuk

    Jan Sacharuk Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Westridge wrote:

    > Oil, any amount of oil, on the rotors is a pain in the arse - and you gotta clean the rear
    > cassette occasionally! V's are superior in that respect - so much easier to fix that little
    > problem.

    This is a problem common to all disk brakes, even hydraulics. It's just something that you have to
    live with.

    BTW, I fouled two sets of pads last year, and I found that, by far, the Kool Stop pads provided much
    better grab on my rotors. That's for Hayes pads, but I figure if the aftermarket pads are better for
    Hayes (and cheaper, too!) they might offer something to the other brake systems.

    JS

    --
    ========================= [email protected] ========================
    Jan Sacharuk Member in Good Standing of The Discordian Solidarity Turn on viewing of the X-Geek-Code
    header to see my Geek Code
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    I'm so happy, 'cause today I found my friends, they're in my head.... -Nirvana
     
  11. Westridge

    Westridge Guest

    "Chris Phillipo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]... <snip>
    > > Oil, any amount of oil, on the rotors is a pain in the arse - and you
    gotta
    > > clean the rear cassette occasionally! V's are superior in that
    respect - so
    > > much easier to fix that little problem.
    >
    > The cassette is on the opposite side of the wheel, you know :)

    Ahhhh... Indeed. They can't get anything past you, can they? ;-P And perhaps that's why I was lulled
    into a false sense of security at the time. Why worry about flicking a little oil onto the rotors?
    After-all, they're on the other side of the wheel!

    >
    > > The rear cable routing is a pain in the arse. OK, so that's more of a
    bike
    > > related issue, but there's a lot of friction in the cables and as a consequence the rear brake
    > > is hard to use and difficult to adjust. Where the cable drops off the frame and goes along the
    > > suspensed seat
    stay
    > > the cable has too much looping and play and thus friction. The cable
    housing
    > > fills with grit too easily too.
    >
    > Whenever I install a cable disc I go for the extra couple of bucks for Shimano SLR/XTR cable
    > housing which doesn't compress easily and a teflon coated brake cable. Then I put some thought
    > into how to route the housing the in the shortest and straightest path possible while still
    > allowing suspension movement.

    New bike. Breaking it in. Recent problem. Learning curve. Yet to make serious adjustments. Thank you
    for the ideas. I had never heard of teflon coated cables. Routing is still a problem although I do
    intend to reduce the length of some of the housings so that the 'loops' are straighter and more
    'direct' in their route.

    >
    > I like the Avid mechanicals but the Deore hydraulic are cheaper than Avids and require virtually
    > no maintenance or adjustment. So, there are really only two reasons to buy Avids; you have
    > brake/shift lever combos you can't break up or you are afraid of installing and bleeding hydraulic
    > brakes yourself. (and I'm telling you people, it's EASIER than messing with cables)

    I'm inclined to agree even though I've never used hydraulic. Cables definitely have their own
    particular problems!

    Westie

    > --
    > _________________________
    > Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
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