Shimano gear cable.



S

Simon Mason

Guest
Last night on a club run my RHS STI Shimano 105 gear cable snapped, sent the
chain to the small rear cog and I tried to compensate by shifting to a
smaller chainring, only to jam the chain in between two rings, meaning a
long cold walk/coast home.

Anyhow, I managed to free the chain by loosening the chainrings at home, but
rather than send the bike into the LBS for a new cable I'll try and put one
in myself. Can anyone point me in the direction of how to fit a gear cable
into a RHS STI 105 shifter?
Thanks.


--
Simon Mason
http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
In article <[email protected]>
Simon Mason <[email protected]> wrote:
> Last night on a club run my RHS STI Shimano 105 gear cable snapped, sent the
> chain to the small rear cog and I tried to compensate by shifting to a
> smaller chainring, .
>

If the cable breaks you can usually fix the derailleur in a lower gear
by screwing in the high limit screw or wedging something between the
screw and the stop. It might even be worth finding a longer screw that
fits and carrying it in your puncture outfit.

> only to jam the chain in between two rings, meaning a
> long cold walk/coast home


Could you not slacken the chainring bolts to free the chain? Or just
stamp on it?
 
P

Paul Boyd

Guest
Simon Mason said the following on 10/11/2006 14:40:

> Anyhow, I managed to free the chain by loosening the chainrings at home, but
> rather than send the bike into the LBS for a new cable I'll try and put one
> in myself. Can anyone point me in the direction of how to fit a gear cable
> into a RHS STI 105 shifter?


How about the Shimano website? http://tinyurl.com/yktdkt

If that fails, go to
http://bike.shimano.com/publish/content/cycle/sac/us/en/technical_service.html
then "Technical Documents". Scroll down a bit, and you'll get to
Shimano 105 Silver - S.T.I. Shift/Brake Lever. Click on that and you'll
see service instructions. Bob's your uncle!

--
Paul Boyd
http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk/
 
M

M-gineering

Guest
Simon Mason wrote:
> Last night on a club run my RHS STI Shimano 105 gear cable snapped, sent the
> chain to the small rear cog and I tried to compensate by shifting to a
> smaller chainring, only to jam the chain in between two rings, meaning a
> long cold walk/coast home.
>
> Anyhow, I managed to free the chain by loosening the chainrings at home, but
> rather than send the bike into the LBS for a new cable I'll try and put one
> in myself. Can anyone point me in the direction of how to fit a gear cable
> into a RHS STI 105 shifter?
> Thanks.
>
>
> --
> Simon Mason
> http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
>
>


http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=117 etc


--
---
Marten
 
S

Simon L

Guest
> Can anyone point me in the direction of how to fit a gear cable
> into a RHS STI 105 shifter?


>From memory, change the shifter into the gear where there's no tension

on the cable (top gear on the rear mech on RHS?), and roll back the
rubber hood at the top. I'm pretty sure the cable nipple is exposed
there with a clean cable run though the mechanism - remove the old
cable and feed through the new one.
 
S

Simon Mason

Guest
"Rob Morley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]

>
> Could you not slacken the chainring bolts to free the chain? Or just
> stamp on it?


No three of us tried, it had jammed fast. In the end I had to slacken the
small chainring bolts to get enough gap to pull it out at home, not in the
middle of Lincolnshire in the pitch dark. Thanks for the other info folks!


--
Simon Mason
http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
In article <[email protected]>
Simon Mason <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> "Rob Morley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
> >
> > Could you not slacken the chainring bolts to free the chain? Or just
> > stamp on it?

>
> No three of us tried, it had jammed fast. In the end I had to slacken the
> small chainring bolts to get enough gap to pull it out at home, not in the
> middle of Lincolnshire in the pitch dark. Thanks for the other info folks!
>

The others should have taken turns at towing you. :)
 
S

Simon Mason

Guest
"Rob Morley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> In article <[email protected]>
> Simon Mason <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> "Rob Morley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>
>> >
>> > Could you not slacken the chainring bolts to free the chain? Or just
>> > stamp on it?

>>
>> No three of us tried, it had jammed fast. In the end I had to slacken the
>> small chainring bolts to get enough gap to pull it out at home, not in
>> the
>> middle of Lincolnshire in the pitch dark. Thanks for the other info
>> folks!
>>

> The others should have taken turns at towing you. :)


One did - I could actually pedal by moving my right pedal forwards about a
foot until the chain length ran out. I'd then pedal back a foot to get the
chain length back. Repeat as necessary.

It was a strain on my right thigh muscle which was the only leg muscle I
could use in this mode of pedalling. My mate then had more pressing duties
as a young woman was apparently going to jump off the Humber Bridge, so he
stopped to talk to her and I kept going.

--
Simon Mason
http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
 
J

James Thomson

Guest
"Rob Morley" <[email protected]> a écrit:

> If the cable breaks you can usually fix the derailleur in a lower gear
> by screwing in the high limit screw or wedging something between the
> screw and the stop. It might even be worth finding a longer screw that
> fits and carrying it in your puncture outfit.


More versatile is a 2" length of cable: you remove the last loop of housing
and feed the cable straight into the barrel adjuster of the mech, holding
the mech in the required gear as you tighten the cable clamp. You can use
the barrel adjuster to trim the position of the mech, and most mechs have
enough travel in the barrel to shift to a larger sprocket, sometimes two.
Saves messing with the limit screws.

Personally, I usually just carry a spare cable.

James Thomson
 
P

Paul Boyd

Guest
On 13/11/2006 21:13, James Thomson said,

> More versatile is a 2" length of cable: you remove the last loop of housing
> and feed the cable straight into the barrel adjuster of the mech, holding
> the mech in the required gear as you tighten the cable clamp. You can use
> the barrel adjuster to trim the position of the mech, and most mechs have
> enough travel in the barrel to shift to a larger sprocket, sometimes two.
> Saves messing with the limit screws.


How do you hold the end of this 2" length that isn't clamped?

--
Paul Boyd
http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk/
 
J

James Thomson

Guest
"Paul Boyd" <[email protected]> a écrit:

> How do you hold the end of this 2" length that isn't clamped?


I don't hold the end of it. Could you clarify your question?

James Thomson
 
C

Clive George

Guest
"James Thomson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "Paul Boyd" <[email protected]> a écrit:
>
>> How do you hold the end of this 2" length that isn't clamped?

>
> I don't hold the end of it. Could you clarify your question?


I suspect what he means is how does it not just slip through the barrel
adjuster. Presumably the answer is that it's a cable with the nipple still
attached.

cheers,
clive
 
J

James Thomson

Guest
"Clive George" <[email protected]> a écrit:

> I suspect what he means is how does it not just slip through the barrel
> adjuster. Presumably the answer is that it's a cable with the nipple still
> attached.


Ah! Bingo.

James Thomson
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
In article <[email protected]>
James Thomson <[email protected]> wrote:
> "Rob Morley" <[email protected]> a écrit:
>
> > If the cable breaks you can usually fix the derailleur in a lower gear
> > by screwing in the high limit screw or wedging something between the
> > screw and the stop. It might even be worth finding a longer screw that
> > fits and carrying it in your puncture outfit.

>
> More versatile is a 2" length of cable: you remove the last loop of housing
> and feed the cable straight into the barrel adjuster of the mech, holding
> the mech in the required gear as you tighten the cable clamp. You can use
> the barrel adjuster to trim the position of the mech, and most mechs have
> enough travel in the barrel to shift to a larger sprocket, sometimes two.
> Saves messing with the limit screws.
>

That's a great use for the end you cut off universal cables, and easier
than fiddling with screws.
 
P

Paul Boyd

Guest
Clive George said the following on 13/11/2006 21:34:

> Presumably the answer is that it's a cable with the nipple
> still attached.


Ah, yes, that would do it. (Mental note - dig out an old gear cable and
stick a couple of inches in my tool kit.)

On my MTB though, in the event of broken derailleur or cable, I would
just swiftly convert it to single speed. I saw someone walking in the
depths of Coed-y-Brenin with a broken derailleur a few months ago. I've
carried a multi-tool with chain-breaker ever since. I suppose the neat
answer would be to have two Power-Links instead of one!

--
Paul Boyd
http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk/
 
B

Ben C

Guest
On 2006-11-13, James Thomson <[email protected]> wrote:
> "Rob Morley" <[email protected]> a écrit:
>
>> If the cable breaks you can usually fix the derailleur in a lower gear
>> by screwing in the high limit screw or wedging something between the
>> screw and the stop. It might even be worth finding a longer screw that
>> fits and carrying it in your puncture outfit.

>
> More versatile is a 2" length of cable: you remove the last loop of housing
> and feed the cable straight into the barrel adjuster of the mech, holding
> the mech in the required gear as you tighten the cable clamp. You can use
> the barrel adjuster to trim the position of the mech, and most mechs have
> enough travel in the barrel to shift to a larger sprocket, sometimes two.
> Saves messing with the limit screws.


What's the other end of the 2" length of cable attached to? Or do you
just leave the ferrule or whatever it's called on one end?
 
D

dkahn400

Guest
Ben C wrote:

> What's the other end of the 2" length of cable attached to? Or do you
> just leave the ferrule or whatever it's called on one end?


The nipple. Yes, I think that's the idea, and it sounds like a great
dodge. You'd probably want to wrap a piece of insulating tape or
similar round the cut end to stop it unravelling while carrying it
around.

--
Dave...
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
In article <[email protected]>
dkahn400 <[email protected]> wrote:
> Ben C wrote:
>
> > What's the other end of the 2" length of cable attached to? Or do you
> > just leave the ferrule or whatever it's called on one end?

>
> The nipple. Yes, I think that's the idea, and it sounds like a great
> dodge. You'd probably want to wrap a piece of insulating tape or
> similar round the cut end to stop it unravelling while carrying it
> around.
>

Just tin it with solder.
 
B

Ben C

Guest
On 2006-11-14, Rob Morley <[email protected]> wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>
> dkahn400 <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Ben C wrote:
>>
>> > What's the other end of the 2" length of cable attached to? Or do you
>> > just leave the ferrule or whatever it's called on one end?

>>
>> The nipple. Yes, I think that's the idea, and it sounds like a great
>> dodge. You'd probably want to wrap a piece of insulating tape or
>> similar round the cut end to stop it unravelling while carrying it
>> around.
>>

> Just tin it with solder.


I did that to protect the end of a cable I'd just installed and for
which I didn't have one of those crimp-cap things, using a normal
electrical soldering iron, and it worked fine. So I tried it again later
on my other bike, which had a fancy Campagnolo cable somehow pre-infused
with Teflon, and the solder absolutely refused to stick to it. I ended
up just putting a blob of glue on the end.
 
D

Doki

Guest
"Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Last night on a club run my RHS STI Shimano 105 gear cable snapped, sent
> the chain to the small rear cog and I tried to compensate by shifting to a
> smaller chainring, only to jam the chain in between two rings, meaning a
> long cold walk/coast home.
>
> Anyhow, I managed to free the chain by loosening the chainrings at home,
> but rather than send the bike into the LBS for a new cable I'll try and
> put one in myself. Can anyone point me in the direction of how to fit a
> gear cable into a RHS STI 105 shifter?
> Thanks.


Cut it with a dremel.