Shimano wheel durability

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Paul Westall, May 31, 2003.

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  1. Paul Westall

    Paul Westall Guest

    I am looking at a bike at my LBS that has some strange Shimano wheels. They have deep, aero rims,
    look like carbon? The spokes have the nipples at the hub rather than the rim. Also, at least at
    first look, it appears the wheel has one long spoke where a normal wheel has two. It appears that
    one end of the spoke is attached to the hub, the spoke then goes through both sides of the deep rim,
    and then back to another nipple at the opposite side of the hub. I don't have a model number for the
    wheels. I don't really mind how the wheels look, but I'm worried ablut durability. LBS says they
    really haven't sold enough of these wheels to say much about durability. Anyone know about these
    wheels? Should I get them swapped for more normal wheels if I buy the bike? TIA Paul
     
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  2. pete-<< LBS says they really haven't sold enough of these wheels to say much about durability.
    Anyone know about these wheels?

    If ya can'tr trust the bike shop...why the bike shop buy these things if they can't stand behind
    them 100%???

    Ask for some conventional wheels built well...these are 'racing wheels', with expected
    reliability....

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  3. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    Kinda like restaurant menus without prices.

    If you have to as...

    "Paul Westall" <[email protected]> wrote
    > I am looking at a bike at my LBS that has some strange Shimano wheels... Should I get them swapped
    > for more normal wheels if I buy the bike?
     
  4. Paul Westall

    Paul Westall Guest

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > pete-<< LBS says they really haven't sold enough of these wheels to say much about durability.
    > Anyone know
    about
    > these wheels?
    >
    > If ya can'tr trust the bike shop...why the bike shop buy these things if
    they
    > can't stand behind them 100%???
    >
    > Ask for some conventional wheels built well...these are 'racing wheels',
    with
    > expected reliability....
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
    Thanks for the advice. I found out the wheels are Shimaon 540's. A couple of internet reviews noted
    that they are "heavy" and "flexy". Normally I ride a mtb, so the shocks would obscure any "wheel
    flex" I'm sure. Is this "flex" a valid point, or is it like the "stiff" aluminum, "compliant" steel
    thing? At any rate, I think you are right-16 spokes seems a little sparse to me for everyday
    riding. Paul
     
  5. On Mon, 02 Jun 2003 01:51:44 +0000, Paul Westall wrote:

    >
    > Thanks for the advice. I found out the wheels are Shimaon 540's. A couple of internet reviews
    > noted that they are "heavy" and "flexy". Normally I ride a mtb, so the shocks would obscure any
    > "wheel flex" I'm sure. Is this "flex" a valid point, or is it like the "stiff" aluminum,
    > "compliant" steel thing?

    You got it. Now, in fairness, some super-light wheels do flex (side-to-side, such as when climbing),
    so much so that some racers loosen their rear brake's QR for a climb. "Heavy" is something you can
    certainly measure, but most aero wheels are pretty heavy compared to box-section wheels at half the
    price. But beware anyone who claims to be able to feel the wheel flex, or who ascribes serious
    concern about a few ounces on the wheel. Weight is weight, weight on the wheel has no more
    importance than weight in the water bottle in terms of speed.

    > At any rate, I think you are right-16 spokes seems a little sparse to me for everyday riding.

    Yeah.
    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or _`\(,_ | that we are to
    stand by the president right or wrong, is not (_)/ (_) | only unpatriotic and servile, but is
    morally treasonable to the American public. --Theodore Roosevelt
     
  6. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Paul Westall wrote:
    > "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>pete-<< LBS says they really haven't sold enough of these wheels to say much about durability.
    >>Anyone know
    >
    > about
    >
    >>these wheels?
    >>
    >>If ya can'tr trust the bike shop...why the bike shop buy these things if
    >
    > they
    >
    >>can't stand behind them 100%???
    >>
    >>Ask for some conventional wheels built well...these are 'racing wheels',
    >
    > with
    >
    >>expected reliability....
    >>
    >>Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    >>(303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
    >
    > Thanks for the advice. I found out the wheels are Shimaon 540's. A couple of internet reviews
    > noted that they are "heavy" and "flexy". Normally I ride a mtb, so the shocks would obscure any
    > "wheel flex" I'm sure. Is this "flex" a valid point, or is it like the "stiff" aluminum,
    > "compliant" steel thing? At any rate, I think you are right-16 spokes seems a little sparse to me
    > for everyday riding. Paul
    >

    I've ridden flexy wheels on my full sus mountain bike. You DO notice
    it. Especailly in the turns. Feels a little flakey (like it's a little less stable -- about to wash
    out). Took getting used to.

    David
     
  7. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    David L. Johnson wrote:
    > On Mon, 02 Jun 2003 01:51:44 +0000, Paul Westall wrote: Weight is weight, weight on the wheel has
    > no more importance than weight in the water bottle in terms of speed.

    I climb better when I drink my water bottle on the way to the trails and ride with just my hydration
    pak (vs. drinking the same amount of water from my hydration pak). But, I doubt that the difference
    in rim weight is the same as a water bottle :).

    David
     
  8. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    David Kunz writes:

    > I've ridden flexy wheels on my full sus mountain bike. You DO notice it. Especailly in the turns.
    > Feels a little flakey (like it's a little less stable -- about to wash out). Took getting used to.

    Could you quantify that a bit. How much does your wheel deflect sideways when you stand on one
    pedal? You can see this clearly at the top of the wheel because it deflects about the same and to
    the same side as the ground contact point, changing the brake pad clearance. Have a look and
    report back.

    Also how much does you front axle go lower when you put your weight on the bicycle. You could
    measure the distance from hub to rim by whether any spoke becomes slack, they having a preload of a
    few thousandths of an inch if steel and a few tens of thousandths of an inch if Kevlar.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  9. Eric Murray

    Eric Murray Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Mon, 02 Jun 2003 01:51:44 +0000, Paul Westall wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Thanks for the advice. I found out the wheels are Shimaon 540's. A couple of internet reviews
    >> noted that they are "heavy" and "flexy". Normally I ride a mtb, so the shocks would obscure any
    >> "wheel flex" I'm sure. Is this "flex" a valid point, or is it like the "stiff" aluminum,
    >> "compliant" steel thing?
    >
    >You got it.

    I disagree.

    I've a set of 535s, the predecessor to the 540. Compared to standard wheels, I can feel some flex in
    the wheels when climbing out of the saddle, and a slight bit of uncertainty on descents. It's not
    objectionable but it is noticeable. They also ride a little softer than regular radial laced wheels.
    I was suprised to notice this. I rode with the same tires (inflated to the same PSI) on the same
    roads. Again, it is not a huge difference, but I have switched back and forth and I do notice it.

    The 535 wheels are pretty durable. So far I have about 5000 miles on them and have needed to tighten
    the rear spokes once. That is much better than I normally get. The wheels were still in true. I
    could not locate a spoke wrench (it uses larger than normal spokes with larger nipples) so I made
    one on a milling machine. They are heavier than many wheels, and I feel this when accellerating on
    the flats or up a climb.

    I have not noticed them being any faster due to being aerodynamic. I am pretty slow on the
    flats though.

    The wheels I replaced them with were cheap Performance something-or-others with a semi-aero rim,
    radial laced 28 or 32 spoke front and 32 rear. They felt lighter and stiffer and had a harsher ride.
    The rear also came with too-low tension and eventually started breaking spokes. So I am back on the
    535s for the moment.

    All in all the 535s are fine recreational wheels (IF you get a spoke wrench!) But a decent set of
    handbuilt "normal" wheels will do just as well, cost the same and feel a little lighter. The
    Performance crap wheels pissed me off. I have a good rear wheel coming from Excel (32 spoke Ritchey
    rim on an ultegra hub) and I'll pair that with one of my old regular front wheels and relegate the
    535s to backup duty.

    Eric
     
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