Shin Splints and bikes

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by jaked, Aug 13, 2006.

  1. jaked

    jaked New Member

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    Hi,

    Walked past the bike shop today and got an idea. Would a bike do the job???

    Can anyone relate to this?

    I turned 40 last year and have been a distance runner for my entire life. A few weeks ago on a typical run I got shin splints. Sharp pains in my shins I am assuming due to the constant pounding on the pavement. Does this happen to cyclists or could taking up cycling give me the excersise I need (type 1 diabetic) without the aches which I think are age related?

    I used to race BMX as a kid, and have never ridden a road bike. (Except to show off to my mates how I could jump in the half pipe with one. OUCH :confused: not again)

    Now if that makes a good idea. the guy in the bike shop suggested that I should get a RoadRacer SL01 at $4200. It looked rather neat, weighed less than half of my ancilliary equipment and supposedly will do me for a long time.

    Money is not an issue but I must be a realist as I will never race a tour. I'd like to join some guys/gals for the odd exteneded fun ride so maybe this bike is more than required so maybe someone could set me straight. Will superlight, super techo help to make up for being a bit long in the tooth and diabetic, or is the difference between this and say a $2400 bike be irrelevant in a non-competitive environment?

    If you know of some hot deals on bikes in my area, pls let me know. I'm in Concord NSW

    Thanks for your interest!

    Jakey d
     
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  2. djk202020

    djk202020 New Member

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    You might want to not jump into the sport for $4200 to begin with. Unless money really isnt an issue. If it turns out you dont like cycling you will have to eat a loss on a bike. You can get alot of bike for 4000 and it is worth looking around and testing different bikes there are so many good bikes in this price range. Before buying do some research, most can be done on this forum through the search function. Determine if you will need a tripple, double, or compact front crank set. Figure out a cassete size, Carbon v. alum v steel, v tittanium, shimano v campy group. For 4Gs you can put together a custom bike and if I were spending this much I would make sure that I was getting everything I wanted.

    As for the shin splints, I have never heard of any cyclists having problems. As we all know cycling is very low impact and almost none of that impact will be absorbed in your shins like running is. One other thing to look out for are other aches and pains that come with cycling. being a beginner you will have to get use to using different muscles and being in different positions, your butt will hurt, your back will hurt, wrists etc. most of these pains will go away as you put more miles on.....This is another reason to make sure you select a bike that is comfortable and fits your riding style.

    ps. even though you might spend 4gs be ready to be passed by people that are on bikes that cost $400. So in my opinion does it matter 2400 v 4000. In your case prob not, it wont make you that much faster if any at all. If you do take the plunge enjoy it and be patient it is very rewarding, unlike running I never once was bored on my bike.
     
  3. jaked

    jaked New Member

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    Thanks for you reply.

    I will make comfort the number 1 priority in selection as I do with my cars. (The SAAB 93 AERO has superb seats).

    P.s In case you had not gathered I'm in Sydney Australia. I live about a mile from Syney Olympic park, so I have some excellent riding areas just around the corner.

    The guy at the shop suggested that composite frames did a great job of absorbing bumps in the road, and the bike he recommended had a composite back end to which he suggested would provide a higher level of comfort over a full aluminium frame. It also had Mavic wheels etc...

    As you mentioned in your closing statement ---

    ps. even though you might spend 4gs be ready to be passed by people that are on bikes that cost $400. So in my opinion does it matter 2400 v 4000. In your case prob not, it wont make you that much faster if any at all. If you do take the plunge enjoy it and be patient it is very rewarding, unlike running I never once was bored on my bike.[/QUOTE]

    I am a frim believer that cheap is never the right way. I found this through experiance, especially in learning musical instuments. My guitar playing took on a whole new dimension when I killed the cheapie and started playing a Maton.

    I will take your quote on board as reality. I did see a full composite bike for AUD$2300 it was a little heavy (i think about 9.0 Kg which is about 2Kg more than the other bike) however something like it should do the job. I do hope I don't find my riding enjoyment was sabbotaged by going cheap....

    P.s I never found running unrewarding, I have ran between 4 - 15 Km per day almost every day for the last 25 years and it has kept my mucles in very good shape.... It might help me keep up with the $400 bike :D :p :)

    Thanks and regards
    Jake
     
  4. tokenron

    tokenron New Member

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    I am a frim believer that cheap is never the right way. I found this through experiance, especially in learning musical instuments. My guitar playing took on a whole new dimension when I killed the cheapie and started playing a Maton.

    I will take your quote on board as reality. I did see a full composite bike for AUD$2300 it was a little heavy (i think about 9.0 Kg which is about 2Kg more than the other bike) however something like it should do the job. I do hope I don't find my riding enjoyment was sabbotaged by going cheap....

    P.s I never found running unrewarding, I have ran between 4 - 15 Km per day almost every day for the last 25 years and it has kept my mucles in very good shape.... It might help me keep up with the $400 bike :D :p :)

    Thanks and regards
    Jake[/QUOTE]
    You can't get shin splints cycling, but if you're like me and your fundamental fitness has been based on running and weight-bearing exercise then you're probably going to get a sore back, wrists, arse etc. My advice would be to buy into the 1000-2000 range, you can get an aluminium bike with carbon forks and stem for about 2 grand with a lifetime warranty on the frame. 9 kilograms for an alloy bike is very light. For example they're selling the Trek 1500 for $2199 at the moment in Melbourne, so I'd guess it would be the same or cheaper in Sydney. Carbon forks, carbon seatpost, full ultegra group. It's not crazy light but then its not going to crack or buckle either.
     
  5. aicabsolut

    aicabsolut New Member

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    I've had horrible shin splints since early high school (just over a decade ago) , when I ran hurdles. They persisted even when I'd cut back on mileage, take breaks, and do everything multiple orthopedists and physiotherapists told me to do.

    My running days are finally at an end, because (or so the theory goes) my shin splints made me supinate to the point that I've messed up my ankle cartilage. Whatever the cause in reality, running hurts too much. So I took up cycling. I have started indoors for over a year, to get strength and stability--no need to muck thinks up worse with a crash on a tender ankle. Now I'm looking into getting out on the road. One thing I can say with confidence: My shins have not felt this good since 7th grade.

    I've been told there are ways to get 'shin splints'-- but only in the sense of cramping of the tibialis anterior muscle--if you toe down too much when you pedal. But as I've played with my pedal stroke, seat and cleat positions, I've had zero problems no matter how flat footed or not I've been. (But my shin splints are really medial tibial stress syndrome if that info helps you at all.)

    Go for it! Cycling is great!
     
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