Shins Splints - why oh why

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Slambram, Mar 24, 2005.

  1. Slambram

    Slambram Guest

    Thought i found the secret for me, but that belief was shattered this
    week. I battled shin splints all week until I got them again today so
    bad after only a few miles that i had marble-size knots on both shins,
    which i massaged out as best i could, but i'm still left with a
    visible bruise where one was.

    I thought my secret was to stretch a little, build up to running
    almost every day, be extra-careful when coming back after even a short
    layoff, and always, always always stay below my "working" pace for the
    first mile (only 8:00 to 8:30).

    Usually, if i can make it past 2 miles without a hint of shint
    splints, i'm free to push myself as hard as i want as long as i can
    take it. This would suggest to me i need to warm up more. I can do
    this if it's that's reason, but i wonder why i get away with not doing
    it more often than not. I've never had anyone evaluate my stride
    other than others say it looks efficient. When the shin splnits kick
    in, my feet start wapping - not before. Whether psychological or
    entirely physical, it's unnerving and it won't be long before i quit
    (feel like everyone in the gym is going, "oh, that's gotts hurt." And
    it does.
    ..
    I train mostly during my lunch hour, so i'm limited to 30-40
    minutes. I go longer on the weekends. I've been getting 4 miles in
    lately, and trying to get that down to 30 minutes (7:30). I'm mainly
    doing this to get cut up a little for the summer, but as with most
    things i enjoy pushing myself and seeing improvement. Before you know
    it i'm dreaming of 10k races, half-marathons, then my lifetime dream
    of a full marathon.

    Basically, the way i want to handle this is to try and loosen the
    tibialis muscle as much as possible before training. I bought some
    heat wraps today and tried out some heat first and it seemed to help.
    It's been 20 hours since the injury though. Ice might have been
    better earlier?
     
    Tags:


  2. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Leafing through rec.running, I read a message from [email protected] of
    25 Mar 2005:

    > Thought i found the secret for me, but that belief was shattered this
    > week. I battled shin splints all week until I got them again today so
    > bad after only a few miles that i had marble-size knots on both shins,
    > which i massaged out as best i could, but i'm still left with a
    > visible bruise where one was.
    >
    > I thought my secret was to stretch a little, build up to running
    > almost every day, be extra-careful when coming back after even a short
    > layoff, and always, always always stay below my "working" pace for the
    > first mile (only 8:00 to 8:30).
    >
    > Usually, if i can make it past 2 miles without a hint of shint
    > splints, i'm free to push myself as hard as i want as long as i can
    > take it. This would suggest to me i need to warm up more. I can do
    > this if it's that's reason, but i wonder why i get away with not doing
    > it more often than not. I've never had anyone evaluate my stride
    > other than others say it looks efficient. When the shin splnits kick
    > in, my feet start wapping - not before. Whether psychological or
    > entirely physical, it's unnerving and it won't be long before i quit
    > (feel like everyone in the gym is going, "oh, that's gotts hurt." And
    > it does.
    > .
    > I train mostly during my lunch hour, so i'm limited to 30-40
    > minutes. I go longer on the weekends. I've been getting 4 miles in
    > lately, and trying to get that down to 30 minutes (7:30). I'm mainly
    > doing this to get cut up a little for the summer, but as with most
    > things i enjoy pushing myself and seeing improvement. Before you know
    > it i'm dreaming of 10k races, half-marathons, then my lifetime dream
    > of a full marathon.
    >
    > Basically, the way i want to handle this is to try and loosen the
    > tibialis muscle as much as possible before training. I bought some
    > heat wraps today and tried out some heat first and it seemed to help.
    > It's been 20 hours since the injury though. Ice might have been
    > better earlier?
    >


    I have a slightly different injury. However, some of the treatment involves
    stretching/relaxing similar muscles. Mainly the tibialis anterior. Here are
    a couple of things you can try:

    http://tinyurl.com/45ry2 decribes a methond for self deep tissue massaging
    of the tibialis. As well as stretching and strengthening. They also sell
    and eBook for $4, which I have purchased. There is a lot of good stuff in
    there about injury prevention and recovery.

    Also, Ozzie Gontang (maintainer of the rec.running FAQ) has posted some
    good advice on shin splints here - http://tinyurl.com/4b9zt

    Good luck!

    Phil M.

    --
    Don't quit when the hill is steepest,
    For your goal is almost nigh;
    Don't quit, for you're not a failure
    UNTIL YOU FAIL TO TRY."

    --Jill Wolf
     
  3. Slambram wrote:
    > Thought i found the secret for me, but that belief was shattered this
    > week. I battled shin splints all week until I got them again today so
    > bad after only a few miles that i had marble-size knots on both shins,
    > which i massaged out as best i could, but i'm still left with a
    > visible bruise where one was.
    >
    > I thought my secret was to stretch a little, build up to running
    > almost every day, be extra-careful when coming back after even a short
    > layoff, and always, always always stay below my "working" pace for the
    > first mile (only 8:00 to 8:30).
    >
    > Usually, if i can make it past 2 miles without a hint of shint
    > splints, i'm free to push myself as hard as i want as long as i can
    > take it. This would suggest to me i need to warm up more. I can do
    > this if it's that's reason, but i wonder why i get away with not doing
    > it more often than not. I've never had anyone evaluate my stride
    > other than others say it looks efficient. When the shin splnits kick
    > in, my feet start wapping - not before. Whether psychological or
    > entirely physical, it's unnerving and it won't be long before i quit
    > (feel like everyone in the gym is going, "oh, that's gotts hurt." And
    > it does.
    > .
    > I train mostly during my lunch hour, so i'm limited to 30-40
    > minutes. I go longer on the weekends. I've been getting 4 miles in
    > lately, and trying to get that down to 30 minutes (7:30). I'm mainly
    > doing this to get cut up a little for the summer, but as with most
    > things i enjoy pushing myself and seeing improvement. Before you know
    > it i'm dreaming of 10k races, half-marathons, then my lifetime dream
    > of a full marathon.
    >
    > Basically, the way i want to handle this is to try and loosen the
    > tibialis muscle as much as possible before training. I bought some
    > heat wraps today and tried out some heat first and it seemed to help.
    > It's been 20 hours since the injury though. Ice might have been
    > better earlier?

    Couple of things to try. First of all get your hands on "The Stick" to
    help roll up and down your shins. Works wonders. If you don't want to
    buy a stick, use rolling pin. It really does help massage the shins.
    Secondly, there is a good stretch for the shin area that will be hard to
    describe in print but here goes:
    To first stretch out the right shin.
    Standing upright with feet together, raise your right leg and pointing
    your foot, cross in front of your left leg and tap your toe on the
    ground by your left heel.
    This should put your left knee behind your right calf.
    Press forward with your left knee, forcing your right leg to bend a bit
    and do not allow your right foot to slide forward. Keep your toes
    firmly planted on the ground. You should feel a good stretch on your
    right shin. It's a great stretch to do prior to a run and also in the
    middle of a run if you feel your shins getting tighter.
    Good luck,
    Steve
     
  4. Slambram wrote:
    > Thought i found the secret for me, but that belief was shattered this
    > week. I battled shin splints all week until I got them again today so
    > bad after only a few miles that i had marble-size knots on both shins,
    > which i massaged out as best i could, but i'm still left with a
    > visible bruise where one was.
    >
    > I thought my secret was to stretch a little, build up to running
    > almost every day, be extra-careful when coming back after even a short
    > layoff, and always, always always stay below my "working" pace for the
    > first mile (only 8:00 to 8:30).
    >
    > Usually, if i can make it past 2 miles without a hint of shint
    > splints, i'm free to push myself as hard as i want as long as i can
    > take it. This would suggest to me i need to warm up more. I can do
    > this if it's that's reason, but i wonder why i get away with not doing
    > it more often than not. I've never had anyone evaluate my stride
    > other than others say it looks efficient. When the shin splnits kick
    > in, my feet start wapping - not before. Whether psychological or
    > entirely physical, it's unnerving and it won't be long before i quit
    > (feel like everyone in the gym is going, "oh, that's gotts hurt." And
    > it does.
    > .
    > I train mostly during my lunch hour, so i'm limited to 30-40
    > minutes. I go longer on the weekends. I've been getting 4 miles in
    > lately, and trying to get that down to 30 minutes (7:30). I'm mainly
    > doing this to get cut up a little for the summer, but as with most
    > things i enjoy pushing myself and seeing improvement. Before you know
    > it i'm dreaming of 10k races, half-marathons, then my lifetime dream
    > of a full marathon.
    >
    > Basically, the way i want to handle this is to try and loosen the
    > tibialis muscle as much as possible before training. I bought some
    > heat wraps today and tried out some heat first and it seemed to help.
    > It's been 20 hours since the injury though. Ice might have been
    > better earlier?

    Couple of things to try. First of all get your hands on "The Stick" to
    help roll up and down your shins. Works wonders. If you don't want to
    buy a stick, use rolling pin. It really does help massage the shins.
    Secondly, there is a good stretch for the shin area that will be hard to
    describe in print but here goes:
    To first stretch out the right shin.
    Standing upright with feet together, raise your right leg and pointing
    your foot, cross in front of your left leg and tap your toe on the
    ground by your left heel.
    This should put your left knee behind your right calf.
    Press forward with your left knee, forcing your right leg to bend a bit
    and do not allow your right foot to slide forward. Keep your toes
    firmly planted on the ground. You should feel a good stretch on your
    right shin. It's a great stretch to do prior to a run and also in the
    middle of a run if you feel your shins getting tighter.
    Good luck,
    Steve
     
  5. Slambram wrote:
    > Thought i found the secret for me, but that belief was shattered this
    > week. I battled shin splints all week until I got them again today so
    > bad after only a few miles that i had marble-size knots on both shins,
    > which i massaged out as best i could, but i'm still left with a
    > visible bruise where one was.
    >
    > I thought my secret was to stretch a little, build up to running
    > almost every day, be extra-careful when coming back after even a short
    > layoff, and always, always always stay below my "working" pace for the
    > first mile (only 8:00 to 8:30).
    >
    > Usually, if i can make it past 2 miles without a hint of shint
    > splints, i'm free to push myself as hard as i want as long as i can
    > take it. This would suggest to me i need to warm up more. I can do
    > this if it's that's reason, but i wonder why i get away with not doing
    > it more often than not. I've never had anyone evaluate my stride
    > other than others say it looks efficient. When the shin splnits kick
    > in, my feet start wapping - not before. Whether psychological or
    > entirely physical, it's unnerving and it won't be long before i quit
    > (feel like everyone in the gym is going, "oh, that's gotts hurt." And
    > it does.
    > .
    > I train mostly during my lunch hour, so i'm limited to 30-40
    > minutes. I go longer on the weekends. I've been getting 4 miles in
    > lately, and trying to get that down to 30 minutes (7:30). I'm mainly
    > doing this to get cut up a little for the summer, but as with most
    > things i enjoy pushing myself and seeing improvement. Before you know
    > it i'm dreaming of 10k races, half-marathons, then my lifetime dream
    > of a full marathon.
    >
    > Basically, the way i want to handle this is to try and loosen the
    > tibialis muscle as much as possible before training. I bought some
    > heat wraps today and tried out some heat first and it seemed to help.
    > It's been 20 hours since the injury though. Ice might have been
    > better earlier?


    Couple of things to try. First of all get your hands on "The Stick" to
    help roll up and down your shins. Works wonders. If you don't want to
    buy a stick, use rolling pin. It really does help massage the shins.
    Secondly, there is a good stretch for the shin area that will be hard to
    describe in print but here goes:
    To first stretch out the right shin.
    Standing upright with feet together, raise your right leg and pointing
    your foot, cross in front of your left leg and tap your toe on the
    ground by your left heel.
    This should put your left knee behind your right calf.
    Press forward with your left knee, forcing your right leg to bend a bit
    and do not allow your right foot to slide forward. Keep your toes
    firmly planted on the ground. You should feel a good stretch on your
    right shin. It's a great stretch to do prior to a run and also in the
    middle of a run if you feel your shins getting tighter.
    Good luck,
    Steve
     
Loading...
Loading...