shoe: motion control vs. stability?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Jeffrey Johnson, Sep 15, 2003.

  1. Hello,,,,I am looing for some shoe clarification. First of all I am very asthmatic(exercise induced)
    so I can run about 2miles tops which I do every day. I am a neutral runner(and was also told this by
    a running shoe store clerk who took me outside). I am thinking of investing in some good cushion
    shoes and have always used new balance and was considering the 991GL. I originally thought of the
    1022 but the 991 fits so much better. However since it is a "stability" shoe will it ruin or harm my
    joints since I dont need stability? The 1022 I thought of because it is strictly cushioning. I guess
    I get confused with stability and motion control which I am sure I dont need. If it matters I am 36
    and weigh about 150lbs. Incidentally running has helped my asthma so much though I can only do about
    2 miles. I live in Atlanta and my goal is to try for the peachtree 2005!! Thanks for any assitance
    on the shoes.
     
    Tags:


  2. Roger Hunter

    Roger Hunter Guest

    "Jeffrey Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Hello,,,,I am looing for some shoe clarification. First of all I am very asthmatic(exercise
    > induced) so I can run about 2miles tops which I do
    every
    > day.

    Ever heard of Ventolin? Get to a doctor, idiot. People die from asthma, yet it's *so easy*
    to control.

    > I am a neutral runner(and was also told this by a running shoe store clerk who took me outside).

    And his training in biomechanical analysis was...?

    > I am thinking of investing in some good cushion shoes and have always used new balance and was
    > considering the 991GL. I originally thought of the 1022 but the 991 fits so much better. However
    > since it is a "stability" shoe will it ruin or harm my joints since I dont need stability?

    Not really, it's just a lot more shoe than you need.

    > The 1022 I thought of because it is strictly cushioning. I guess I get confused with stability and
    > motion control which I am sure I dont need. If it matters I am 36 and weigh about 150lbs.

    Go for a lightweight trainer. Most are for neutral runners, or slight pronators.

    > Incidentally running has helped my asthma so much though I can only do about 2 miles. I live in
    > Atlanta and my goal is to try for the peachtree 2005!! Thanks for any assitance on the shoes.

    Get your asthma sorted and you'll be running 10ks by June. On the other hand, you could invest a
    fortune in running shoes and wait until you induce a *really* serious attack. Then you'll never need
    to trouble me again.

    Roger. <I only get annoyed 'cause I care
     
  3. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Jeffrey Johnson wrote:
    >
    > Hello,,,,I am looing for some shoe clarification. First of all I am very asthmatic(exercise
    > induced) so I can run about 2miles tops which I do every day. I am a neutral runner(and was also
    > told this by a running shoe store clerk who took me outside). I am thinking of investing in some
    > good cushion shoes and have always used new balance and was considering the 991GL. I originally
    > thought of the 1022 but the 991 fits so much better. However since it is a "stability" shoe will
    > it ruin or harm my joints since I dont need stability? The 1022 I thought of because it is
    > strictly cushioning. I guess I get confused with stability and motion control which I am sure I
    > dont need. If it matters I am 36 and weigh about 150lbs. Incidentally running has helped my asthma
    > so much though I can only do about 2 miles. I live in Atlanta and my goal is to try for the
    > peachtree 2005!! Thanks for any assitance on the shoes.

    Stability shoes are generally considered the most neutral. Cushioned shoes are generally for people
    with rigid feet or underpronators, stability for near neutral, and motion control for overpronators.
    Stability shoes do have some devices to keep the foot pointed forward, but not nearly as rigid as
    motion control shoes may be. Some have some cushioning or shock absorption also. If the 991 fits
    best, I'm guessing that's probably the best choice for you.

    Good luck.

    Dot

    --
    "Success is different things to different people" -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, Jeffrey Johnson wrote:
    > Hello,,,,I am looing for some shoe clarification. First of all I am very asthmatic(exercise
    > induced) so I can run about 2miles tops which I do every day. I am a neutral runner(and was also
    > told this by a running shoe store clerk who took me outside). I am thinking of investing in some
    > good cushion

    Check other factors to confirm this: wear patterns on shoes, wet foot test, arches, etc.

    > shoes and have always used new balance and was considering the 991GL. I originally thought of the
    > 1022 but the 991 fits so much better. However since it is a "stability" shoe will it ruin or harm
    > my joints since I dont need stability? The 1022 I thought of because it is strictly cushioning. I

    Ultimately, comfort trumps everything else, IMO. I've never looked seriously at the 991 so can't say
    much about it.

    BTW, unless you're injury-prone, wearing a shoe that's classified as "stability" isn't catestrophic.
    The divisions are somewhat arbitrary anyway. I've seen shoes classified as "cushioning" that are
    pretty stiff, and also a lot of very soft "cushioning" shoes.

    > guess I get confused with stability and motion control which I am sure I dont need. If it matters
    > I am 36 and weigh about 150lbs. Incidentally running has helped my asthma so much though I can
    > only do about 2 miles. I live in Atlanta and my goal is to try for the peachtree 2005!! Thanks for
    > any assitance on the shoes.

    I agree with Roger -- at your weight, you could look at the lighter shoes. Here's a starting point:

    NB : 831 Mizuno: Wave Rider/Precision Asics: Gel Verdict/DS Trainer

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  5. Cipher

    Cipher Guest

    If you're an under pronator (i.e. supinator) like me, you need cushioning shoes. That said, I use
    the New Balance 751 (now the 752) and they're great. I've used the New Balance 830 (now the 831),
    but find that they're almost too lightweight and I start hurting (I weigh 142 lbs) after 10 - 12 km.
    I too have asthma, but it's mild and I just need to carry my inhaler just in case.

    "Jeffrey Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,,,,I am looing for some shoe clarification. First of all I am very asthmatic(exercise
    > induced) so I can run about 2miles tops which I do
    every
    > day. I am a neutral runner(and was also told this by a running shoe store clerk who took me
    > outside). I am thinking of investing in some good
    cushion
    > shoes and have always used new balance and was considering the 991GL. I originally thought of the
    > 1022 but the 991 fits so much better. However since it is a "stability" shoe will it ruin or harm
    > my joints since I dont need stability? The 1022 I thought of because it is strictly cushioning. I
    > guess I get confused with stability and motion control which I am sure I dont need. If it matters
    > I am 36 and weigh about 150lbs. Incidentally running has helped my asthma so much though I can
    > only do about 2 miles. I live in Atlanta and my goal is to try for the peachtree 2005!! Thanks for
    > any assitance on the shoes.
     
  6. I take the strongest Advair on the market. I need to use Proventil at about 2-3 miles. Thanks for
    the information.

    "Roger Hunter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Jeffrey Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Hello,,,,I am looing for some shoe clarification. First of all I am very asthmatic(exercise
    > > induced) so I can run about 2miles tops which I do
    > every
    > > day.
    >
    > Ever heard of Ventolin? Get to a doctor, idiot. People die from
    asthma,
    > yet it's *so easy* to control.
    >
    >
    > > I am a neutral runner(and was also told this by a running shoe store clerk who took me outside).
    >
    > And his training in biomechanical analysis was...?
    >
    >
    > > I am thinking of investing in some good cushion shoes and have always used new balance and was
    > > considering the 991GL. I originally thought of the 1022 but the 991 fits so much better. However
    > > since it is a "stability" shoe will it ruin or harm my joints since I
    dont
    > > need stability?
    >
    > Not really, it's just a lot more shoe than you need.
    >
    >
    > > The 1022 I thought of because it is strictly cushioning. I guess I get confused with stability
    > > and motion control which I am sure I dont need. If it matters I am 36 and weigh about 150lbs.
    >
    > Go for a lightweight trainer. Most are for neutral runners, or slight pronators.
    >
    >
    > > Incidentally running has helped my asthma so much though I can only do about 2 miles.
    I
    > > live in Atlanta and my goal is to try for the peachtree 2005!! Thanks
    for
    > > any assitance on the shoes.
    >
    > Get your asthma sorted and you'll be running 10ks by June. On the other hand, you could invest a
    > fortune in running shoes and wait until you
    induce
    > a *really* serious attack. Then you'll never need to trouble me again.
    >
    >
    > Roger. <I only get annoyed 'cause I care
     
  7. Roger Hunter

    Roger Hunter Guest

    "Jeffrey Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > I take the strongest Advair on the market. I need to use Proventil at
    about
    > 2-3 miles.

    My dear fellow, if you still suffer EIA on your current drug regime, then your asthma is not well
    controlled and your treatment protocol needs to be reviewed. May I respectfully suggest that you
    schedule a visit to a consultant in respiratory medicine, advise him of your running aims, and tell
    him to sort you out. If he can't get you to the stage where you can run five or six miles without
    discomfort, you should re-assess your exercise programme and consider substituting swimming in place
    of running. I'm sure you're aware that swimming is the exercise of choice for asthmatics.

    Best of luck.

    Roger.
     
  8. Couple of asthma tips. Exercise induced asthma is generally caused by 'irritations' to your
    bronchial tree, such as colder air entering as you breath harder (like when you go from hot to cold
    and get tight), plus more allergens etc. getting into your lungs. A couple of ways to help the
    asthma is to improve your lung function so you don't have to breath so hard - swimming is very good
    for this. I haven't tried them myself, but the commercial lung trainers might be a good idea.
    Secondly, try to stop irritation to your lungs buy breathing in through your nose and out through
    your mouth - although if you're anything like me (asthma and hayfever), that's easier said than
    done! For some reason, I know not why, being outside a lot helps my asthma - might be the same for
    you. It's possible that allergens in the house (dust mites, skin, etc.) set me off, you might have
    something similar.

    Good luck, and stick at it. Sport has really healped my chest and can probably do the same for you.

    Dave (.... who isn't qualified at anything in particular, so keep close contact with your doc /
    asthma clinic)
     
  9. >Ever heard of Ventolin? Get to a doctor, idiot. People die from asthma, yet it's *so easy*
    >to control.

    I was thinking the same thing, there's also the new class of drugs like Singulair.

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - ( o ) ( o )
    OO ?
    >-----<
     
  10. Ab

    Ab Guest

    Jeffrey,

    I will have to agree with Roger - get yourself to a respiratory specialist that will get your asthma
    in control. I have EIA, and when I first started running, I could only do about 5 minutes on the
    treadmill. I went to a specialist who told me that if I took my albuterol 15 minutes prior to
    exercising [and he adjusted the dose of my corticosteroid], I would be able to run more comfortably.
    My persistence in sticking with the running and gradually increasing time and distance over three
    years have built up my conditioning, to the point that I am T-1 week to my first marathon next
    Sunday. I am also taking less than half the dosage of my corticosteroid than when I was first
    started. So, get yourself to a specialist and take control of your asthma!

    Ab

    "Jeffrey Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I take the strongest Advair on the market. I need to use Proventil at
    about
    > 2-3 miles. Thanks for the information.
    >
    >
    > "Roger Hunter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "Jeffrey Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > > Hello,,,,I am looing for some shoe clarification. First of all I am
    very
    > > > asthmatic(exercise induced) so I can run about 2miles tops which I do
    > > every
    > > > day.
    > >
    > > Ever heard of Ventolin? Get to a doctor, idiot. People die from
    > asthma,
    > > yet it's *so easy* to control.
    > >
    > >
    > > > I am a neutral runner(and was also told this by a running shoe store clerk who took me
    > > > outside).
    > >
    > > And his training in biomechanical analysis was...?
    > >
    > >
    > > > I am thinking of investing in some good cushion shoes and have always used new balance and was
    > > > considering the 991GL.
    I
    > > > originally thought of the 1022 but the 991 fits so much better.
    However
    > > > since it is a "stability" shoe will it ruin or harm my joints since I
    > dont
    > > > need stability?
    > >
    > > Not really, it's just a lot more shoe than you need.
    > >
    > >
    > > > The 1022 I thought of because it is strictly cushioning. I guess I get confused with stability
    > > > and motion control which I am sure
    I
    > > > dont need. If it matters I am 36 and weigh about 150lbs.
    > >
    > > Go for a lightweight trainer. Most are for neutral runners, or slight pronators.
    > >
    > >
    > > > Incidentally running has helped my asthma so much though I can only do about 2
    miles.
    > I
    > > > live in Atlanta and my goal is to try for the peachtree 2005!! Thanks
    > for
    > > > any assitance on the shoes.
    > >
    > > Get your asthma sorted and you'll be running 10ks by June. On the
    other
    > > hand, you could invest a fortune in running shoes and wait until you
    > induce
    > > a *really* serious attack. Then you'll never need to trouble me again.
    > >
    > >
    > > Roger. <I only get annoyed 'cause I care>
    > >
    >
     
  11. I really dont see the point in calling me an idiot. I have asthma. I go to a doctor. He prescribes
    what he prescribes. My crappy HMO only covers certain drugs. I am sure I am not the first person
    to get asthma while running. I am sure I am not the first person who gets denied newer class of
    drugs because it is more expensive for an HMO. etc. etc......Thanks to those responding with shoe
    answers though.

    "Bill-always hard-Rodgers " <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >Ever heard of Ventolin? Get to a doctor, idiot. People die from
    asthma,
    > >yet it's *so easy* to control.
    >
    > I was thinking the same thing, there's also the new class of drugs like Singulair.
    >
    > Bill R.
    >
    > =============> - -- - ( o ) ( o )
    > OO ?
    > >-----<
    >
     
  12. Thanks....I had though about taking proventil before I ran but my doctor said I can only have 2
    inhalations every 8 hours and I didnt want to "waste" them on a non-attack. I do think he is wrong
    because I have read of people using proventil as a preventitive for an attack......I will try for a
    couple of weeks and see how I do. Thanks again,,,,,,

    "Ab" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Jeffrey,
    >
    > I will have to agree with Roger - get yourself to a respiratory specialist that will get your
    > asthma in control. I have EIA, and when I first started running, I could only do about 5 minutes
    > on the treadmill. I went to a specialist who told me that if I took my albuterol 15 minutes prior
    > to exercising [and he adjusted the dose of my corticosteroid], I would be
    able
    > to run more comfortably. My persistence in sticking with the running and gradually increasing time
    > and distance over three years have built up my conditioning, to the point that I am T-1 week to my
    > first marathon next Sunday. I am also taking less than half the dosage of my corticosteroid
    than
    > when I was first started. So, get yourself to a specialist and take
    control
    > of your asthma!
    >
    > Ab
    >
    >
    > "Jeffrey Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I take the strongest Advair on the market. I need to use Proventil at
    > about
    > > 2-3 miles. Thanks for the information.
    > >
    > >
    > > "Roger Hunter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > "Jeffrey Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > > Hello,,,,I am looing for some shoe clarification. First of all I am
    > very
    > > > > asthmatic(exercise induced) so I can run about 2miles tops which I
    do
    > > > every
    > > > > day.
    > > >
    > > > Ever heard of Ventolin? Get to a doctor, idiot. People die from
    > > asthma,
    > > > yet it's *so easy* to control.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > > I am a neutral runner(and was also told this by a running shoe store clerk who took me
    > > > > outside).
    > > >
    > > > And his training in biomechanical analysis was...?
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > > I am thinking of investing in some good cushion shoes and have always used new balance and
    > > > > was considering the
    991GL.
    > I
    > > > > originally thought of the 1022 but the 991 fits so much better.
    > However
    > > > > since it is a "stability" shoe will it ruin or harm my joints since
    I
    > > dont
    > > > > need stability?
    > > >
    > > > Not really, it's just a lot more shoe than you need.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > > The 1022 I thought of because it is strictly cushioning. I guess I get confused with
    > > > > stability and motion control which I am
    sure
    > I
    > > > > dont need. If it matters I am 36 and weigh about 150lbs.
    > > >
    > > > Go for a lightweight trainer. Most are for neutral runners, or
    slight
    > > > pronators.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > > Incidentally running has helped my asthma so much though I can only do about 2
    > miles.
    > > I
    > > > > live in Atlanta and my goal is to try for the peachtree 2005!!
    Thanks
    > > for
    > > > > any assitance on the shoes.
    > > >
    > > > Get your asthma sorted and you'll be running 10ks by June. On the
    > other
    > > > hand, you could invest a fortune in running shoes and wait until you
    > > induce
    > > > a *really* serious attack. Then you'll never need to trouble me
    again.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Roger. <I only get annoyed 'cause I care>
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  13. Rutager

    Rutager Guest

    Give the guy a break. It was that dipshit Roger who started this by calling him an idiot.

    [email protected] (Bill-always hard-Rodgers ) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > >I really dont see the point in calling me an idiot.
    >
    > Well now you truly are an an idiot, because I didn't write that part of the quote. I quoted your
    > faux Dr friend Roger Hunter, it was HE who called you an idiot, idiot. BTW, your "nowhere.com"
    > addy gives your true ID away. I mean at least put some effort into it next time, you do a
    > disservice to imposters everywhere being so obvious.
    >
    > Bill R.
    >
    > =============> - -- - ( o ) ( o )
    > OO ?
    > >-----<
     
  14. Roger Hunter

    Roger Hunter Guest

    "Bill-always hard-Rodgers " <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > >Give the guy a break. It was that dipshit Roger who started this by calling him an idiot.

    > I know, that's what I was pointing out to him. I'm innocent, innocent I tell ya!

    Boys, boys, calm down! Let me explain.

    Asthma varies from mild to truly debilitating. EIA is asthma brought on by exertion, usually
    exercise. EIA is relatively easy to control, via the appropriate medication prior to the
    commencement of exercise. Jeff states in his original post that he has asthma induced by exercise,
    and that he can run for about two miles - roughly the time that mild EIA would kick in, so symptoms
    fit patient's diagnosis. I then suggest that he is an idiot. Why? Well, mild EIA can be easily
    controlled via medication. If he knew he had EIA - which he did - then he should have taken steps to
    ensure he didn't expose himself to the risk of a severe attack by ensuring that he was prescribed
    the appropriate drug. His SECOND post then advises us that he is already on a high dose drug regime,
    and not just for EIA. Picture changes. Seems no-one has taken the time - or if they have he wasn't
    listening - to explain to Jeff the range and function of drugs for asthma. Put simply, there are
    classes of drugs that prevent asthma occurring, and there are those that relieve an attack when it
    does occur. Again - put simply - preventers are taken on a daily basis for the remainder of your
    life (although there have been rumblings of a vaccine! Hooray!) and relievers are taken on an 'as
    required' basis. HOWEVER, if you are regularly using a 'reliever', you should have your asthma
    reviewed to ensure that a 'preventer' wouldn't be more appropriate. Simple?

    Now, if anyone posts here that they have a potentially life threatening condition, yet appears
    to know as little about it as Jeff, I reserve the right to continue to call them an 'idiot'.
    I'll also call you an 'idiot' if I dislike the content or tone of your post, if you use poor
    grammar or punctuation, if you disagree with me on any subject and if you fail to find me
    entertaining. OK? Good!

    Roger.
     
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