Shoe Shelf Life

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Apr 18, 2006.

  1. ...."But EVA also has a shelf life. Krone explained that running shoes
    lose about 20 percent of their resiliency in six months without use --
    those tiny air bubbles aren't sealed, so the air in them bleeds out --
    a main reason for the frequency of new shoe models. "And that's why
    you can go online and get last year's models at a significant
    discount," Krone added.

    http://tinyurl.com/hlryx

    This is a new one on me, not sure I believe it, comes from a shoe
    salesman. The guy is saying the pressure of gravity is sufficient to
    force out the air (bleed) from the tiny air bubbles to a measure of
    nearly 20% resiliency is is lost in 6 months. Well if this is true
    imagine the bleeding that takes place with the pressures/forces on
    those bubbles from actual use. I gotta figure it's at least 2 or 3
    months bare minumum for a Eva based shoe to go from production to the
    foot of a runner, if not more.

    Side note: I sent back a pair of Fastswitch Flats to Saucony as the
    mesh sidewalls were separating away from the soles at the mid point of
    the shoe. It was not me and my heavier mass causing this as Pendejo
    reported the same observation and I've never had this problem before.
    To Saucony's credit and though they've been bought be the big company
    (StrideRite), they replaced the shoes no question and have sent me a
    new pair. Yes I expect to encounter the same problem down the line
    with this model but Saucony's making good and enabling me to get the
    use I should have out of 1 pair, by sending me a fresh pair.
     
    Tags:


  2. On 18 Apr 2006 14:48:35 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >Side note: I sent back a pair of Fastswitch Flats to Saucony as the
    >mesh sidewalls were separating away from the soles at the mid point of
    >the shoe. It was not me and my heavier mass causing this as Pendejo
    >reported the same observation and I've never had this problem before.
    >To Saucony's credit and though they've been bought be the big company
    >(StrideRite), they replaced the shoes no question and have sent me a
    >new pair. Yes I expect to encounter the same problem down the line
    >with this model but Saucony's making good and enabling me to get the
    >use I should have out of 1 pair, by sending me a fresh pair.


    Thief! I'm turning you in.
     
  3. [email protected] wrote:
    > ..."But EVA also has a shelf life. Krone explained that running shoes
    > lose about 20 percent of their resiliency in six months without use --
    > those tiny air bubbles aren't sealed, so the air in them bleeds out --
    > a main reason for the frequency of new shoe models. "And that's why
    > you can go online and get last year's models at a significant
    > discount," Krone added.


    This is why I always store my shoes in a hyperbaric chamber.

    Cheers,
    Craig

    --
    Corollary to Clarke's Third Law:
    Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently
    advanced.
     
  4. Bumper

    Bumper Guest

    Only problem I've ever had with EOLed shoes is after a decade with some
    of the older models (Asics 121s) the glue that holds the sole to the
    last lets go. A thin layer of ShoGoo and they are good for 300 to 400
    miles.

    I wonder how much air my fat ass forces out of those tiny bubbles during
    a 26 miler.

    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > ..."But EVA also has a shelf life. Krone explained that running shoes
    > lose about 20 percent of their resiliency in six months without use --
    > those tiny air bubbles aren't sealed, so the air in them bleeds out --
    > a main reason for the frequency of new shoe models. "And that's why
    > you can go online and get last year's models at a significant
    > discount," Krone added.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/hlryx
    >
    > This is a new one on me, not sure I believe it, comes from a shoe
    > salesman. The guy is saying the pressure of gravity is sufficient to
    > force out the air (bleed) from the tiny air bubbles to a measure of
    > nearly 20% resiliency is is lost in 6 months. Well if this is true
    > imagine the bleeding that takes place with the pressures/forces on
    > those bubbles from actual use. I gotta figure it's at least 2 or 3
    > months bare minumum for a Eva based shoe to go from production to the
    > foot of a runner, if not more.
    >
    > Side note: I sent back a pair of Fastswitch Flats to Saucony as the
    > mesh sidewalls were separating away from the soles at the mid point of
    > the shoe. It was not me and my heavier mass causing this as Pendejo
    > reported the same observation and I've never had this problem before.
    > To Saucony's credit and though they've been bought be the big company
    > (StrideRite), they replaced the shoes no question and have sent me a
    > new pair. Yes I expect to encounter the same problem down the line
    > with this model but Saucony's making good and enabling me to get the
    > use I should have out of 1 pair, by sending me a fresh pair.
     
  5. Kaz Kylheku

    Kaz Kylheku Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > ..."But EVA also has a shelf life. Krone explained that running shoes
    > lose about 20 percent of their resiliency in six months without use --
    > those tiny air bubbles aren't sealed, so the air in them bleeds out --
    > a main reason for the frequency of new shoe models. "And that's why
    > you can go online and get last year's models at a significant
    > discount," Krone added.


    You have stumbled upon bullshit on the Internet (say it isn't so). This
    is so stupid, it hurts.

    You can get last year model discounts on all kinds of consumer goods,
    many of which don't contain air bubbles that fizz out. Shoes are phased
    out this way for the same reasons.

    The air bubbles in EVA foam are not pressurized. They will not
    spontaneously deflate.

    If the bubbles were pressurized but not sealed, it would not take six
    freaking months for the air to leak out.

    If the bubbles were sealed, the foam would be much more rigid, because
    the bubbles would only compress their trapped air under stress, rather
    than deflate.

    Air bleeding out of foam is a good thing; it's what helps absorb shock.
    Foam is squeezed, the air is compressed, and some of it flows out. When
    the foam restores its shape, the air flows back in. The walls of the
    bubbles, the cell structure, behaves like a spring, and the movement of
    air like a shock absorber.

    The foam will lose its absorbing properties if the elastomer breaks
    down: it will not restore to its original shape, thereby losing its
    capacity for air.

    That isn't going to happen over a mere six months.
     
  6. Guest

    Kaz Kylheku <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> ..."But EVA also has a shelf life. Krone explained that running shoes
    >> lose about 20 percent of their resiliency in six months without use --
    >> those tiny air bubbles aren't sealed, so the air in them bleeds out --

    [snip]

    > You have stumbled upon bullshit on the Internet (say it isn't so). This
    > is so stupid, it hurts.

    [snip]

    > The air bubbles in EVA foam are not pressurized. They will not
    > spontaneously deflate.


    > If the bubbles were pressurized but not sealed, it would not take six
    > freaking months for the air to leak out.

    [snip]

    Damn, well that's $70K for a shoe storage chamber down the tubes.

    http://outlet.med1online.com/showproduct.aspx?productid=113

    Cheers,
    Craig

    --
    Corollary to Clarke's Third Law:
    Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently
    advanced.
     
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