Shoes and Pedals - Input Required

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by vvanherk, Dec 26, 2013.

  1. vvanherk

    vvanherk New Member

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    Hello All.

    I'm looking to update my shoes and pedals, and would appreciate some input.

    I'm a casual / enjoyment rider, but trying to do more each year.

    Currently I have Dura-Ace PD-7700 pedals - Sidi Genius 3 shoes (I think), with SPD-R cleats.

    The pedals and shoes I bought with the bike in 1998. The have held up pretty good I think, but they are starting to wear a bit. I'm noticing a bit of play in the engagement, a velco strap on the shoe is duct-tapped, pontoon broke off one cleat, etc.

    I could likely get by with new cleats, but looks like SPD-R is no longer 'supported'. Also, I dont mind upgrading if it is worthwhile, and I will relegate my old shoes to spin class (just started doing that for winter).

    So, I'm looking at just replacing pedals with Dura-Ace PD-9000, and some decent Sidi shoes (watching for online sales for good price).

    Couple of questions:
    1. Is there a difference in 'feel' between SPD-R and the newer SPD-SL. I like how the SPD-R connects, and provided a pretty tight fit. Are the SPD-SL mechanism similar, better, worse, etc?

    2. Are the carbon pedals durable? I have a few nicks and scratches on existing pedals, and dont want to buy an expensive pedal if it is going to shred away if I scrape the pavement, etc.

    3. I shop at PBK - but are there any other good online retailers to compare with for this stuff. I live in Ontario Canada.

    4. Any recommendations around pedals and shoes appreciated. No real budget, but like getting good value for the money.

    Thanks in advance.

    Regards,
    Vic
     
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  2. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I have CF Dura-Ace SPD-SL (PD-9000) pedals. I've never used the PD-7700. I can say that the Dura Ace pedals feel like they have less slop--none that I can feel anyway--than my Look Keos did. They have a pretty stiff spring that does require a bit more effort to click in than any Looks or Speedplays I've used. It definitely promotes a secure feeling. The fact the pedal bodies are wider than the Keos and than the PD-7700s adds to that secure feeling. I've found the pedals to be as durable as anything else out there. I'm not terribly easy on equipment, but the pedals still look good. I will add that the cleats last longer and are easier to get around in. than the Looks. As for shoe recommendations, that's difficult given how personal fit is, but with that said, you can't go wrong looking at Shimano, Giro, Sidi, or Specialized shoes. I have Specialized S-Works shoes and like them a lot. Before these I had Shimano SH-R215s which were about as good. The PD-9000s are the best pedals I've ever used.
     
  3. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    I've had various flavors of Look pedals over the years, even going back to the mid 80's and the original white pedal that Hinault used to use. All of them ended up with crap bearings, sooner rather than later. Same deal with the Time pedals I had. My first Dura Ace pedals were 7400's - toe clips and straps and my last was a set of 7800's with the SPD-SL. They worked just like any Look pedal but had the same ace bearings the 7400s did. I sold the 7800's to buy some Speedplay pedals and it was one of the few equipment changes I really regret. I've had them about 30 months and my second set of bearings is about to give up the ghost despite frequent greasing.

    I'll be in the market next year for a set of Dura Ace 9000 pedals. They come with two axle widths now, which will be useful.
     
  4. OneEyedJack

    OneEyedJack New Member

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    Unfortunately for my sins I am or was a compulsive shoe / bike stuff buyer. I have tried most brands of shoes and have had most flavours of pedals bar speed play.

    My recommendations on shoes are Mavic Zxelliums either normal or wide fit (maxi) . They are stiff light and the heel hold is spot on.

    All of the look pedals I have had haven't been half as durable as any shimano pedal I have purchased. The Looks have developed squeak's and just haven't inspired confidence and in one case I had an axle snap mid ride and ended up on the deck in the middle of the road. To that end I wont even entertain the new look blade2 pedals. I have the new carbon dura's pedals on my race bike and ultegra carbon on my other bike. For me the robustness of the shimano's wins out.

    Hope that helps, I am certainly not brand loyal... Campag groupsets and Shimano pedals ... that's me...
     
  5. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    Yeah baby! ( in Austin powers voice)

    OP, if the SPD-r you speak of were the same I was running on my Shimano shoes in the early 90's (just like the Lancer) I used to get an awful hot spot on longer rides. Not sure if it was the small contact patch of the cleat, or the shoe causing it.

    Sparing you the embellishment of my other setups I now use the SPD-sl on a DA 7810 pedal (with the Genius5 shoe). 4 years later am still using the same pedals (with a Campy group), really the best pedals I have owned.

    All in all like the bigger contact patch of the SPD-sl vs. the SPD-mountain style/old metal road cleat. And the plastic cleat doesn't tear up nice wooden floors.
     
  6. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    SPD-R & SPD-SL pedals are very different ...

    The SPD-SL has traditionally been used to label the pedals which are basically the older, traditional LOOK (aka "Delta") pedal but with a shallower nose-piece (SL == Shimano LOOK) ...

    You can only use the Shimano's cleats with the SPD-SL pedals whereas the SPD-SL cleats can be used with the traditional LOOK pedals ...

    I do not know if there has been recent re-labeling of the model labels whereby the SPD-R designation is now being used for SPD-SL pedals ...

    You can still source traditional SPD-R cleats (and pedals) on eBay ... at the moment, it appears that the price varies for the early, TWO-HOLE SPD-R cleats starting at $8.00 (plus, postage) ...

    Have you tried adjusting the tensioner on the back of the pedals?

    Obviously, a replacement pontoon is the best replacement for the broken pontoon ... but, you could probably use some GOOP to glue a suitable chunk of relatively hard rubber onto the metal cross piece from which it broke away (remove the assembly from the sole of the shoe) ...

    Before re-installing the pontoon assembly, use a grinder to reduce the DIY pontoon to the appropriate size (if necessary) after the GOOP has "dried" & set.

    BTW. Most shoe repair shops [that is, shops where you would have shoes re-soled] can probably repair the strap on your shoe.
    FWIW. I have both the Ultegra version of the SPD-R pedal + the equally obsolete WELLGO copy. The Wellgo copy of the pedal has a higher nose-piece AND (more importantly) it has two different styles of cleats ...

    1. one of the Wellgo cleats mounts using the "standard" three-hole/(LOOK) mounting holes
    2. and, the other Wellgo cleat uses the two-hole mounting used with "regular" SPD cleats.

    When available, the Wellgo copy is typically less than $30 for a pair (with cleats) on eBay.
     
  7. classic1

    classic1 Well-Known Member

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    Ive used spd-r and spd-sl. The retention on the spd-r was phenomenal, I used them on the track, but I doubt I'd ever pull a foot out of the spd-sl. I find the spd-sl more comfortable with the wider platform and easier to clip in and out of than spd-r. Like swampy said, Shimano bearings are excellent, even on the 105 versions. Personally I wouldn't buy carbon spd-sl pedals. They are more expensive and save minimal weight, 20gms or something insignificant like that It would be near impossible to find new shoes with the two bolt spd-r pattern I would expect. You can't go wrong with spd-sl imo. Best pedals I've owned
     
  8. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Now if Time would reissue a lightweight version of their old Criterium TBT pedals with really good bearings I'd buy a pair the first day they were released for sale. Lots of ground clearance and ace float - and they took a damn good beating too. That said, I've actually been thinking about toe clips and straps...
     
  9. monteeman

    monteeman New Member

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    Always so inteesting to visit your site. I have bookmarked this and will return soon more about it thank you.
     
  10. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Quote by Swampy:
    "All of them ended up with crap bearings,"

    Look manufactures Campy's pedals. With the exact same crap bearings.

    I've roached Record and Chorus bearings. In one case, only 8,000 miles or so. Sure, Campy will sell you French-made replacement 'cartridges' (basically, you save you old pedal body and get pre-assembled new guts on a new axle), but for the money and poor availability in the States (where no self-respecting yuppie biker rebuilds his own equipment!) you might as well just buy a new pair of pedals.

    Still, I would rather be hit by a runaway train of crude oil tanker cars than be seen with shimaNO products under my feet.
     
  11. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    I can see why you'd see that as acceptable since you're more than likely riding with components made in jelly molds in a shed run by Borats cousins. ;)
     
  12. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Verrrry niiice!
     
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