Shoes - cross training

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by endurancemom, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. endurancemom

    endurancemom New Member

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    I guess I would consider myself a fitness cyclist. I enjoy bike tours (non competitive) and just riding around towns and countrysides. I'm working on increasing my mileage this year and plan to be in several more tours than last year.

    I've been riding for a few years now and have always worn just regular tennishoes. I've been thinking about getting one of the more casual cycling shoes pairs - the ones that look more like a hiking shoe than a pro cycling shoe. What I'm looking for is also to be able to wear the same shoe when I do my indoor cycling and weight training. The weights are just 1 to 2 days a week. I've read that cycling shoes make for a more efficient ride. I don't want to spend a lot on the shoes - saw the casual pairs in the 50 to 60 range which is fine..

    What are your thoughts? Any other riders out there with similar riding schedules to mine? What do you wear?
     
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  2. Dave Cutter

    Dave Cutter Active Member

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    I am just wondering... what do you wear to play tennis in?

    I guess on the surface it would only make good sense... bowling shoes for bowling, golf shoes for golf, basketball shoes for B-Ball, running shoes for running, steel-toe shoes at the construction site.... and so on and so forth.

    There are plenty of good reasons for wearing cycling shoes when cycling and for NOT wearing them when weight lifting.

    But aside form the good reasons... there are always... "other reasons". I don't wear cycling shoes myself (for other reasons) but I do wear toe clips (and have for many years). They aren't as efficient (or as safe) as the clip-less pedals and shoes but they do keep my feet on the pedals. A tennis shoe slipping off a pedal under force could be a very bad thing. I am not... and do not recommend the old toe clips. But that is what I use.
     
  3. endurancemom

    endurancemom New Member

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    I might just continue to use what I have been - my retired running shoes. Switched over to cycling from running a few years back. The current pair is REALLY worn out now - migiht just pick up a pair from Target or somewhere similar.

    FYI-I have a pair of nice hiking shoes (lower cut) and they are SO comfortable. Wore them on an outdoor ride and liked the extra grip but indoors they kept my feet way to hot (plus-wearing them to work..).
     
  4. 64Paramount

    64Paramount Active Member

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    You might want to try on a pair of bike touring shoes. They usually are a bit stiffer in the sole than a tennis shoe, but are still flexible enough to make walking comfortable. They often can be worn with or without cleats.
     
  5. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    If you get cycling shoes, casual or pro look, you need to buy cycling pedals along with them. Mountain Bike shoes have the casual trekking look with a stiff sole but comfortable for walking, i recommend the SPD cleat system with a double platform pedal, SPD on one side and normal teeth platform on the other side, so you get the best of both worlds, i would leave weight training alone and use the tennis shoes on those days, for cross training purposes consider a sporting wrist-watch, like Polar, they have cross training specific models on sale,
     
  6. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    If you get cycling shoes--touring or MTB shoes--I don't think your feet will dig doing something more than weight lifting like, say, running a lot, racquet sports, ballet........If you've been ok cycling in your tennies but want something a bit more robust, you might consider trail running shoes, approach shoes (called as much because they're used by climbers on the approach to climbs....usually they're low cut with a bit more robust midsole than tennies...a bit lighter than hiking shoes/boots), or low cut hiking shoes.
     
  7. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    I wear cycling shoes with a recessed cleat weightlifting, since I do not want to carry an extra pair when I ride to the gym. Be aware of the surface you are walking on, they will not harm dense rubber mats but will tear up wood floors. They do not affect upper body lifts. I can do squats and such with no problem as well; though I use a relatively light weight and push through the heel of my foot. I would shy away from any lift that puts a lot of pressure in the ball of your foot - no calf exercises.

    Stay away from most of the cardio equipment while wearing them as well.
     
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