should I be concerned

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jake Bellows, Apr 28, 2003.

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  1. Jake Bellows

    Jake Bellows Guest

    hello all,

    Just went clipless on Friday, and you all gave me some sage advice (as usual). I love the
    difference, but have been noticing some pain in my left knee, is this normal when you switch over,
    or could it be a sign that perhaps the cleat is out of position or something else. Once again I am
    asking for you to share your wisdom and experience, thanx in advance. Jack.
     
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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Jake Bellows" <[email protected]> wrote in news:Aukra.174859 [email protected]:
    > Just went clipless on Friday, and you all gave me some sage advice (as usual). I love the
    > difference, but have been noticing some pain in my left knee, is this normal when you switch over

    Yes. Take a wrench with you on your next ride and stop periodically to tweak the cleat position
    until you feel no lateral or twisting pressure on your knees.
     
  3. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    also, it is worth mentioning that you may need to adjust your saddle height as well. Looks lift you
    up quite a bit, maybe a few mm. Not so sure about SPD - varies.

    "Jake Bellows" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > hello all,
    >
    > Just went clipless on Friday, and you all gave me some sage advice (as usual). I love the
    > difference, but have been noticing some pain in my left knee, is this normal when you switch over,
    > or could it be a sign that perhaps the cleat is out of position or something else. Once again I am
    > asking for you to share your wisdom and experience, thanx in advance.
    Jack.
     
  4. J Morelstein

    J Morelstein Guest

    No--you shouldn't be experiencing pain. As some others suggested you can try to adjust the cleats
    yourself; for myself I went to the local bike shop and had a "pedal fit" done by their "fitter". If
    the fitter knows what he's doing it's (IMHO) money worth spent. But then I hate pain. "Jake Bellows"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > hello all,
    >
    > Just went clipless on Friday, and you all gave me some sage advice (as usual). I love the
    > difference, but have been noticing some pain in my left knee, is this normal when you switch over,
    > or could it be a sign that perhaps the cleat is out of position or something else. Once again I am
    > asking for you to share your wisdom and experience, thanx in advance.
    Jack.
     
  5. > Just went clipless on Friday, and you all gave me some sage advice (as usual). I love the
    > difference, but have been noticing some pain in my left knee, is this normal when you switch over,
    > or could it be a sign that perhaps the cleat is out of position or something else. Once again I am
    > asking for you to share your wisdom and experience, thanx in advance.
    Jack.

    Make sure you don't have too aggressive a position for the cleat. The ball of your foot should be
    over the pedal spindle, or in front of it, but *never* behind if you have a knee issue. Generally,
    the ball of the foot corresponds to the widest part of the shoe, so you can eyeball it with the shoe
    upside down.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  6. Harris

    Harris Guest

    Jake Bellows <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Just went clipless on Friday, and you all gave me some sage advice (as usual). I love the
    > difference, but have been noticing some pain in my left knee, is this normal when you switch over,
    > or could it be a sign that perhaps the cleat is out of position or something else. Once again I am
    > asking for you to share your wisdom and experience, thanx in advance. Jack.

    Just curious if you normally put the left foot down when you stop. If so, the pain *may* be due to
    the twisting motion rather than the pedaling motion. Or as suggested by others, you may need to
    raise the saddle slightly.

    Art Harris
     
  7. "j morelstein" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > No--you shouldn't be experiencing pain. As some others suggested you can try to adjust the cleats
    > yourself; for myself I went to the local bike shop and had a "pedal fit" done by their "fitter".
    > If the fitter knows what he's doing it's (IMHO) money worth spent. But then I hate pain. "Jake
    > Bellows" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > hello all,
    > >
    > > Just went clipless on Friday, and you all gave me some sage advice (as usual). I love the
    > > difference, but have been noticing some pain in my left knee, is this normal when you switch
    > > over, or could it be a sign that perhaps the cleat is out of position or something else. Once
    > > again I am asking for you to share your wisdom and experience, thanx in advance.
    > Jack.
    "Pedal Fitters" That's a good one. Funnier that "bike fitters" and "wheel builders." Some things we
    can do for ourselves surely. Are we still allowed to cut our own fingernails?
    > >
     
  8. On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 15:18:02 -0400, Michael Pearlman wrote:

    > "Pedal Fitters" That's a good one. Funnier that "bike fitters" and "wheel builders." Some things
    > we can do for ourselves surely. Are we still allowed to cut our own fingernails?

    Well, there are nail salons....

    Ever had a fit-kit session? Tells you what a bike should feel like when dialed in. Once you know,
    you can pretty much tweak the bike to your liking. The thing with a professional (knowledgeable) fit
    is that it saves weeks (or even years) of pain. And it gives you a chance for your riding position
    to be critiqued by a professional.

    Sure, now I can pretty much tweak the bike myself. But 10 years ago, when I went clipless, I had
    lots of knee pain. Riding with a screwdriver in your pocket, and stopping every few miles to tweak
    your clear is no fun. Spend the $$ and save the time.

    -Dondo
     
  9. Ken wrote:

    > "Jake Bellows" <[email protected]> wrote in news:Aukra.174859
    > [email protected]:
    > > Just went clipless on Friday, and you all gave me some sage advice (as usual). I love the
    > > difference, but have been noticing some pain in my left knee, is this normal when you
    > > switch over
    >
    > Yes. Take a wrench with you on your next ride and stop periodically to tweak the cleat position
    > until you feel no lateral or twisting pressure on your knees.

    This is not as easy as it sounds, because while you're on the bike you need to look at the underside
    of the pedal to see the relationship of the pedal & the cleat.

    (Sounds like Schroedinger's cat).

    Phil
     
  10. Ken

    Ken Guest

    Etaoin Shrdlu <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >> Yes. Take a wrench with you on your next ride and stop periodically to tweak the cleat position
    >> until you feel no lateral or twisting pressure on your knees.
    >
    > This is not as easy as it sounds, because while you're on the bike you need to look at the
    > underside of the pedal to see the relationship of the pedal & the cleat.

    You think too much. The bottom of your shoe is the opposite of the top of your shoe. That's all you
    need to know.
     
  11. Ken wrote:
    > Etaoin Shrdlu <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >>> Yes. Take a wrench with you on your next ride and stop periodically to tweak the cleat position
    >>> until you feel no lateral or twisting pressure on your knees.
    >>
    >> This is not as easy as it sounds, because while you're on the bike you need to look at the
    >> underside of the pedal to see the relationship of the pedal & the cleat.
    >
    > You think too much. The bottom of your shoe is the opposite of the top of your shoe. That's all
    > you need to know.

    Besides if you just remove your feet from your shoes instead, you can look at the shoe and cleat
    position from below. Mark out where you want to move the cleat and do it. This is of course lots
    easier on the trainer.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  12. Heppy

    Heppy Guest

    Just my 2p's worth: I read somewhere that the cleat toe-in/out should be in line with your natural
    toe-in/out. Whether your natural toe-in/out is optimal when cycling is another argument, but to
    determine it, it said to sit on the edge of a table so that your legs dangle freely, then look down
    at each foot to see how each points in or out. Adjust the cleat toe-in/out accordingly. A refinement
    to this may be to sit so you knees are bent at the same angle your knees are at when you're applying
    maximum force to the pedals, then check each foot's toe-in/out.

    Also, check that your seat points straight down the top tube. For example, if it points
    slightly left, maybe it's forcing your left thigh out then in on the downstroke, thereby
    over-stressing the knee.

    If the saddle's straight, watch your knees when you pedal - maybe your knees bow out/in on the
    downstroke anyway. Ymay reduce stress (therefore pain) if your knees bend in one plane only (i.e. go
    up and down in a straight line - not necessarily perfectly vertically).

    Harry
     
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