Should I buy a Litespeed Tuscany?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by gator92, Jul 30, 2003.

  1. gator92

    gator92 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2003
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi,

    I used to race in the past while in high school and college, but with time constraints, stopped cycling completely in the last 5-6 years (I am 33 y.o.)

    I want to get back into cycling and ride about +/- 100 miles a week (mostly for exercise.) I am NOT a person who likes to ride centuries, but like short (20-40 mile rides) and like to get anaerobic a few times during the ride. I am 6'1" 170 lbs and NOT 20 anymore. I need something fast, light and COMFORTABLE. I live in FL (FLAT!!!)

    Here is the question:

    For less than $3000, which bike should I get?

    I looked at the 2003 Litespeed Tuscany recenly on sale for $2500 (ultegra/shimano WH-R540 wheels).

    Is there a better bike for the price (since that bike MSRP is $3300)???

    Any advice greatly appreciated!

    Mike
     
    Tags:


  2. devinci_freak

    devinci_freak New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi,

    At that price, I really think trying a new material (other than steel and aluminium) is a great idea. Depending on the model, you'll get 105 or ultegra. I also suggest putting strong wheels (or you'll always be bike shop to fix them). Litespeed has been doing titanium frames for years, they offer a good guarantee and the bikes are beautiful. I intend to buy one someday, and I really like the Tuscany, so may be I am not the best to advice, but I really would answer yes, to your question. Titanium is very durable, and it won't oxydise. I think its price is the only reason it isn't that popular.
     
  3. Deejay

    Deejay New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Mike,

    I am also currently investigating a titanium bike, but I am not going to spend quite so much (approx £2000), and to get access to a US frame I have to spend a little more. However, for the kind of money you are thinking of spending, I would advise you also check out Serotta and Airborne for titanium frames. I am currently plotting (little does my wife suspect - ha ha haaa!) to buy an Airborne Valkyrie kitted out with Look HSC forks, Campag Centaur/Chorus and Mavic Open Pro rims on Record hubs (I can also include a carbon fibre seatpost for that kind of money, and I understand they can make a difference in comfort). Interestingly, Airborne have clearance frames/bikes on their website, and there are some beauties, though I am not sure there are any your size right now - I suspect you will be looking for a 58cm frame, same as me (though I am about 20lbs heavier than you).

    Just my two pence worth, as I am in a similar situation to you, although I never raced, I was a serious cycle commuter. And I'm nearly 33!

    Good luck making your choice - I know how tough it can be!

    Deej
     
  4. rv

    rv New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2002
    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    0
    the tuscany is a fine bike. I ride a classic, which is a step or two up. lifetime warranty on the frame for the original owner, won't rust, will last a lifetime if its not physically damaged (wreck, hammer, etc.)

    airborne is for people who have to have ti but can't afford a litespeed. you knowing the price still thinking litespeed, you'll never be happy with an airborne.

    go to the link. do it NOW! HURRY!

    http://rivercitybikes.com/products/product_1134.asp
     
  5. Deejay

    Deejay New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Words of wisdom from the brand-fixated in their lofty castle in the clouds :p Notice how he couldn't resist mentioning the position of the Classic versus the Tuscany (a step or two up)?

    Serrotta is a nice expensive name if that's your bag...
     
  6. rv

    rv New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2002
    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    0
    sorry deejay...didn't know you rode an airborne.

    and to be more complete, the classic is about 4 steps down from the top. I bought mine for the geometry, not bragging rights. I wanted a frame to last a lifetime, to both race and ride centuries on, and that's what I bought.

    unlike litespeed's aluminum models which are cranked out in the same taiwanese factory as the low end models of some of the "old guard" euros, litespeed's ti bikes are HANDMADE about 3 miles from my house. I've been in the factory and seen the process. and yes, I feel a certain amount of brand loyalty.

    and yes, serotta is a fine, expensive bicycle. sometimes you have to pay for quality. good quality, race level bicycles equipped with reliable, lightweight components cost a lot of money regardless of the name...serotta, colnago, litespeed, cannondale, bianchi, etc.
     
  7. gator92

    gator92 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2003
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    What about a 2002 Cannondale 4000Si (Dura ace/Mavic Ksyrium/The post/carbon seatpost and bars, Look pedals)....

    A bit more ($3000) but better components...
     
  8. Deejay

    Deejay New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    No problem!!! You are right of course about paying for quality, and I am sure Litespeed didn't get the name they have by making overpriced bicycles. The factory visit must have been fun! My main problem is location - being in England, we have to pay an additional premium for top quality frames from the US, and it's tough enough to justify an Airborne, let alone a Litespeed...sigh:(
    and I have seen both the Classic and the Tuscany...gorgeous.

    Gator, if you have the money for Litespeed (and seeing the deal from RV's message, even I could probably afford one) and that is what you have your heart set on, then you have to go for it :D

    Good riding!

    Deej
     
  9. rv

    rv New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2002
    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    0
    cannondale makes a fine bike. its double heat treated aluminum frames are as good as anyone's, and better than most. in fact, I have a cannondale mountain bike. but I got tired of falling off, borrowed (and rode for 6 months) a friend's 15 year old steel fugi, loved road cycling, and never looked back.

    again, I chose the litespeed ti frame because I wanted a frame that would literaly last a lifetime. and I thought the ti would be a better ride. I have friends with c'dales that would rather fight than switch, but I also know how stiff my mtb frame is. if I was going to sometimes spend 5 - 7 hours on a bike, I wanted a smoother ride.
     
  10. Deejay

    Deejay New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would be interested to know what is the consensus on carbon frames - the Trek 5200 looks pretty good and, to tell the truth, I haven't bought my Airborne yet, though I think it is the bike for me.
     
  11. old&slow

    old&slow New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    0
    Funny how the same old argument goes round and round. I don't think the detail on most Litespeeds I've seen is as good as some other Ti manufacturers (I'm not including Airborne there, never seen one in the flesh as they're rare in Aust) ..... the notable example here is 'Titanium Sports' who used to make many 'badge engineered' frames including the short lived Mongoose Ti stuff. They are from quality Sandvik tubes, sexy curved stays and the finish is PERFECT .... check their web site. They had many, but not all, sizes left at US $699 or so for frame only. It's unbranded so no bragging rights but is fabulous value for money. Build it with top end groupset and you've got one very classy bike.
     
  12. prestonjb

    prestonjb New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Messages:
    85
    Likes Received:
    0
    What is the problem with the detail... I don't see anyone complaining about the detail? What is the detail problems you speak of?

    Yea it's too bad Mongoose was bought by Pacific cycles and kinda reduced in quality by the other "huffy". However I cannot say that the stuff was better than Litespeed.


    An personally I think the statements made by everyone about where each of the Litespeed bikes fit is VERY misleading...

    First off the base specs for these bikes is what makes them... BETTER? But the frames may not be that different...

    For example the Ghisallo allows you to buy a complete bike with a Reynolds Ouzo Pro fork and Campy Record. Those are not choices for the Tuscany.

    *AND* the purpose of the gemoetry and materials between the Ghisallo and the Classic or even the Vortex are different. The Classic/Tuscany are ALL-AROUNDERS while the Ghisallo and Vortex are more for climbing jobs. The pros tend to have 3 different bikes for the different jobs and Litespeed provides different bikes for those jobs.. NOT that the most expensive cannot do or is intended to do what the Classic and Tuscany are designed for.

    Also that the Classic is a "step up" from the Tuscany is again a matter of component selection than differences in the frames. The tuscany has the swayed seat stays while the classic does not. That could mean that the classic is "less modern" than the tuscany!

    So letsw take a closer look at the RANGE of bikes that Litespeed provides but don't get hung up that the RANGE implies that one FRAME is better than another FRAME... It may be different to perform aspecific job, it may use straght tubing instead of tapered to save time/cost, it may use hand rolled and welded tubing to add strength to be a light weight climber, it may use bladed tubing to be a TT bike...

    But the first and biggest difference that affects the pricing of the MSRP is the component selection.

    I've owned a Litespeed Catalist for 6 years and I got it for a sweet deal and since I've replaced it with the best of the best that was not part of the original choices... And the only differnce between the Cacalist and the Classic is the use of straght tubing [on the Catalist] and the Catalist did not come in a polished finish which I find to be better because I can buff out the scratches easier!!!

    JBP
     
  13. prestonjb

    prestonjb New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Messages:
    85
    Likes Received:
    0
    Cannondale... I think they make good aluminum bikes... They also tend to use their own components which may be a good/bad thing.

    They claim their new crank is lighter than the 2004 Dura-ace but I think they also use a proprietary BB shell size so not sure if you are stuck with their crank and stuff...

    Specialized does a simmilar thing too...

    I'm not too fond of this stuff...
     
  14. prestonjb

    prestonjb New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Messages:
    85
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've not used carbon except for forks and such so I can't say. Several of my friends ride treks and they seem to like em and USPS likes em so I guess they gotta be good.

    From what I hear from them, the carbon tends to have a duller sounding ride... Not sure what that means or if once you ride it a while you won't even know or care???

    JBP
     
  15. prestonjb

    prestonjb New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Messages:
    85
    Likes Received:
    0
  16. prestonjb

    prestonjb New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Messages:
    85
    Likes Received:
    0
  17. old&slow

    old&slow New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dear Preston jb, didn't mean to offend ..... by 'detail' I was referring to little finishing features like the slot in the seat tube, weld appearance and shaping of the dropouts. I'M NOT SAYING the detail finish on Litespeeds is bad, far from it because, like most top end frames they are excellent, but I don't believe it matches the standard of some other makes incl Ti Sports or the pre-buy out Merlin. Personal opinion only but I do find that Litespeed owners I've talked to tend to be a bit like C40 riders (or Ferrari & Ducati owners too) in that they simply ain't gonna admit that their ride is anything less than perfect ?
     
  18. hillclimber

    hillclimber New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2003
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  19. hillclimber

    hillclimber New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2003
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mike, I am a former racer too. I am also a gearhead, so I did mega research when I bought my bike. I nixed aluminum right away, very nervous twitchy ride. I loved ti, in fact Lemond was my favorite. The geometry is superb, well thought out, and very very versitile and comfortable. I love their steel frames too. In fact, I bought a Zurich...full Utegra...Bontrager wheels like Lance...it rocks !!!!!!!!! My buddies who still race have riddden it, and are blown away... check em out!!!! Those in the know, still ride the new steel frames......
     
  20. xranger_99

    xranger_99 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hope this isnt late, but oh well. I Actually have been going through the very same issue. Except im 39yr's old.
    After looking at a ton of bikes I was a little confused about todays technology. I looked at the Trek 5500 and actually was pursuing this frame. But, since Lance won again with the frame, drop in the stock has'nt happened even with the 04 models coming out. The geometry fit me well.

    I started looking at Litespeed, outta my $$$ range. Then I stumbled upon a 2002 Tuscany. After researching and finding out the geometry was very close, I made the purchase. Needless to say Ill be getting a lifetime warranty...plus full Dura Ace groupo. carbon handlebar, carbon seat post ya dda yadda yadda and still be under $2200.00. Which I dont think is bad at all.

    Its my conclusion that if ya want what ya want, just bump down a yr and build your own.

    Best of luck. Cant wait till its finished.

    Matt

















     
Loading...
Loading...