Should I buy a Litespeed Tuscany?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by gator92, Jul 30, 2003.

  1. gator92

    gator92 New Member

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    Well after all the research and time...


    I bought a 2003 Litespeed Tuscany. Dura-Ace + Shimano WH-7000 wheels.

    I love this bike!

    The store I got it from actually FITS people for a bike. I was going to get a 59-60" frame, but after the math was done I got the 57" with the right stem and seatpost. The bike fits me perfecly! I rode for the last 57 miles (2 rides) and am not sore (other than the legs.)
    This is what I wanted. I rode a C-dale R4000Si, thinking this was it, but that frame is too rigid and not for me. The Litespeed is fast with the current wheels, and quick to accelerate, and stiff too. I feel the bumps, but it is more like the Reynolds steel bike I used to race.

    Thank you Litespeed. I like to ride again.

    Mike
     


  2. xranger_99

    xranger_99 New Member

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    What size inseam do you have Mike? How tall are you ? I bought the 59cm, it was super close to the Trek 60cm in every section and actually a little smaller in some.

    Matt
     
  3. gator92

    gator92 New Member

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    Matt,


    I am 6'1", and my inseam was i think 90cm.

    The simple math came out (just using the inseam) to about 59-60 cm. I got measures with six times for inseam, torso, shoulder with etc. and my frame is a 57-58! This 57 is perfect, at a great price.

    By the way the store I got it from is Bike Tech (ask for isabelle) in Miami, FL.

    I drove 2 hours to get there...and i was worth it.


    Mike
     
  4. xranger_99

    xranger_99 New Member

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    Super, sounds like you'll be a happy man. I stand 6ft with inseam at 35in. So it sounds like were pretty close. I went with the 59cm frame. When I was riding the Trek 58cm it made me feel to close and cramped, of which the Litespeed 59cm is between the Trek 58cm and 60cm on tube length. So Im pretty sure it will fit correctly.

    Hope you enjoy your new bike

    Matt
     
  5. gator92

    gator92 New Member

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    You too!

    Let me know how you like the Litespeed.

    Mike
     
  6. Powderfinger

    Powderfinger New Member

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    TREK 5200

    hey... i would highly recommend the trek 5200. it's a little cheaper than the Tuscany (mine was about $2200) and it rides beautifully. With the extra cash you could put on some kick ass components or get a good cyclometer

    i know every devil and his dog seems to be riding this bike right now, but it does provide a good bang for the buck.
     
  7. vadimivich

    vadimivich New Member

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    I lived on Lookout Mountain for four years, I've visited the Litespeed factory twice, and been to River City Cycles more times than I can count (LBS in Chattanooga, just over the river). I'd never, never, never, ever buy a Litespeed. If I'm buying a Ti bike, I'm going to buy one where the seat tubes and chainstays are always full welded, and not tack welded and forgotten. Where the dropouts are going to be carefully machined and finished, not left unfinished on a fully polished bike, etc. I saw way, way to many poorly finished Litespeeds to ever invest my hard earned $$ into one. The Taiwanese frames that you blow off (simply based on manufacturing location) are generally far higher in quality than the American made frames. I'd buy a Litespeed Sirius long before I'd buy a Tuscany or Classic (or the worst of them all ... the Blade)

    For those of you who read the review of the Tuscany by bikesportmichigan, read this review (by the same site) of the Blade - it lists every fit and finish reason I'd never buy a Litespeed: http://bikesportmichigan.com/reviews/blade.shtml and here's a link from that to an example of Litespeeds often spotty weld quality: http://bikesportmichigan.com/reviews/blade/Bladecrappywelds.jpg (notice the completely missing weld on the back of the seat tube junction).

    If you want a Ti bike, and think the Litespeed name is more prestigious than say Habenero or Douglas or Dean ... then go for it, but I'd suggest looking at other Ti manufactures before throwing down your cash. If you want a truly high end Ti frame ... Moots, Serotta and Seven all make very nice bikes that put anything Litespeed produces to shame.
     
  8. xranger_99

    xranger_99 New Member

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    Powder,

    My $2200 gets me the add ons. The $2200 is the "whole" bike not just the frame. Thats what I was saying, I bought the frame at a reduced cost so that I could have all the fun stuff. :)
     
  9. xranger_99

    xranger_99 New Member

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  10. vadimivich

    vadimivich New Member

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    The problem is that on many Litespeeds I've seen, the tack welds were the only welds applied ... the finish welding seemed to be simply forgotten. While a tack weld might be enough to hold a frame in a jig, I'm not sure I really want to be riding on it.

    There are other Ti bikes in the same price range as the Litespeeds, and I'd much rather purchase a Dean or a Guru Veloci'ti or a Lemond, etc
     
  11. xranger_99

    xranger_99 New Member

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    Well I would agree with you on that. Im not sure I would want to ride on a tack weld either. Actually the article praised the Tuscany line for the perfect welds. No weld can be deemed perfect unless it goes through NDT ( non destructive testing ) Which Im not sure any bike does, atleast 100% of production.
    You know the funny part of this, people talk about how people want to look good or its the name . I dont even know the color of my frame yet ( if it was a painted model) I forgot to ask..lol

    I just hope its not fusia :p
     
  12. gator92

    gator92 New Member

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    Did you ride a Litespeed?
    What bike do you ride ?


    The question is not the process, it is the final product and the RIDE. I have seen a lot of great engineering marvels that I'd never ride.

    I like my bike. I could have had a aluminum for much less. That was not an option.

    Mike
     
  13. justcook

    justcook New Member

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    I actually ride a Litespeed, the old Catalyst. I bought it the final year it was produced, back when they upgraded the tubes to double butted. Then they started offering the cheap-o looking painted models and dropped the Catalyst. Anyway, my point is that I ride what used to be the least expensive Litespeed model, and the bike has been a dream. I rode aluminum bikes for many years before that, and they rattled my bones. My Litespeed takes serious abuse without any faltering. I feel like it transfers my energy to the wheels far better than any aluminum bike can. It has just enough give in the frame to save my back. The geometry is tight enough for short rides, but I feel just as comfortable on long, hilly rides.

    I'm surprised to read the stuff on this thread from guys slamming Litespeed. I feel good about buying an American-made frame (the Catalyst was produced entirely in the U.S.). The ti-market has grown a lot since I bought my bike, but I'm here to vouch for Litespeed quality. I crashed pretty hard about two years ago. I destroyed my Bell helmet in the crash and got bruised up pretty bad too. But my bike came through without a scratch or dent (my model is brushed, so that helped). If I had been on one of my old aluminum Cannondales, I could have kissed the frame good-bye after a crash like that.

    My last bit of advise it to go for the best frame you can afford. I don't agree with the people saying to buy a Trek and get better components. I bought my bike with Shimano Ultegra and Mavic wheels. Now I have mostly Dura-Ace components and Rolf wheels. I've changed other parts like the saddle, stem, etc. Everytime I add new stuff to this high-quality frame, it feels like I've bought a brand new bike.
     
  14. vadimivich

    vadimivich New Member

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    I own a Klein Quantum Race frameset, built up with Campy Record 10sp. I wanted an aluminum frame for the ride quality, and Klein makes a killer bike, plus it's American made and has as good finish work as anyone.

    There are many other American manufacturers who work with titanium ... it's seems to be the American frame material of choice. Dean, Habenero and others make very high quality frames here in the USA which would shame the Litespeeds in the same price range. And if you truly want a high end, custom made frame ... spend your $5k on a Moots Vamoots or a Seven Axiom.

    My beef with Litespeed is that they are seen as "High End American Titanium" when they are really nothing of the sort - there are many other manufacturers who are overshadowed by their marketing machine, yet make much finer bikes, all hand made here in the US. Litespeed makes good Ti frames, but nothing special compared to 10 other manufactures, many of whom produce better quality work at a similar, or even lower, price.

    http://www.moots.com

    http://www.sevencycles.com

    http://www.deanbikes.com/index2.htm

    http://www.habcycles.com
     
  15. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Deej: Are any bikes still built in your neighborhood? I've got an old 1974 Raleigh Gran Sport, from the "Carlton Frame Works". It's a stout Reynolds 531 bike which served me well for many years. But, if you take a close look at the quality of the welds and the alignment, I'm sorry to say you could already see the end of the british cycle industry coming 30 years ago.

    My newer RT600 Raleigh is from Kent, WA, and looks much better, although the paint work leaves something to be desired and the alum/steel collars are starting to corrode.

    I've been looking at the Heritage Pro online, understand they are now made in Taiwan. Local shops don't stock these.....anyone have comments on the quality of the welds and paint?

    Thanks,
    Dan
     
  16. szbert

    szbert New Member

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    Sounds a wee bit snobbish :) But that's ok.
    I had a Tuscany - loved it! Great bike.
    Unfortunately, a bike thief lusted after it as well and it is gone.

    Now I ride an Airborne Zeppelin. It's every bit as good a frame as the Tuscany at a whole lot less money. I'm 220+ lbs and can stress a bike. The Tuscany held up fine and the Airborne is just as awesome.

    I won't say I'd never spend the money on a Litespeed again - but I probably won't. With the money saved compared to the Tuscany I upgraded to Campy Record gruppo and have never regretted it.:)

    That said - I'm sure you'll love the Tuscany. I just hope the dirtball who stole mine met the front end of a garbage truck at high speed :mad:
     
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