Should I listen to the salesman?



Ghost9

New Member
Jun 1, 2006
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I used to love riding through the woods jumping over tree stumps and down trails etc but then I moved. I haven't been riding much in several years but I'm eager to get back into it. What I need help with is pricing, quality, and type. Basically I'd like to be able to ride on trails and do mountain bike type of things, but I live in the city and the majority of riding I'll be doing is probably going to be paved trails. But I'd still like to be able to make a trip and take my bike on some off road type trails.

I talked to a sales guy at a local bike shop and he was suggesting either a marin bike(forgot the model) with road tires at about $470; or for a mountain bike, a Kona(forgot the model) at $560. Now I'm somewhat out of the loop on prices and yes I know a model name would make a lot of difference, but what is a reasonable price for a good bike? I'm no expert so I don't need racing or expert bikes, but I'm not sure what a good price range is. I have a feeling this bike shop may be over priced or very specialty. The majority of bikes they had were 500+, and then I see bikes at Sports Authority(and other stores like it) for bikes starting at 250. I guess I just don't know what's worth it. The guy did show me one bike they had that was 260, but he said it was **** and would wear out much faster. How do I know if he was just being a salesman trying to get me to spend?

I have been searching and searching on the net for a good reliable site for bike reviews, but have had a hard time finding one. This is the first site that is actually up to date with content. Does anyone know a good bike review site? Do some brands have a bad name where some are more reliable?

The sales guy told me that if I ever wanted to go on rough trails I should probably pick up a mountain bike. He said that if I wasn't on a rough trail I could always put road tires on, but if I was ever going to do some off road I should get a mountain bike. It made sense to me, but he was also suggesting a more expensive bike. Anyone have an opinion on the direction I should go?

Thanks for any suggestions in advance!!
 

Topsi1208

New Member
May 6, 2006
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I went with a Hybrid because I thought I would be riding off road some but it turns out I ride almost exclusively on the road. I found out my hybrid is o.k. for hard packed dirt trails but not much else off road. I did ride it on some motor bike trails that run under some power lines, not too steep and it about beat me to death! No suspension on my bike. I haven't taken it off road since! I'm ready to upgrade to a true road bike & my hybrid is up for sale! If I decide to go off road, I will buy a real mountain bike.



Ghost9 said:
I used to love riding through the woods jumping over tree stumps and down trails etc but then I moved. I haven't been riding much in several years but I'm eager to get back into it. What I need help with is pricing, quality, and type. Basically I'd like to be able to ride on trails and do mountain bike type of things, but I live in the city and the majority of riding I'll be doing is probably going to be paved trails. But I'd still like to be able to make a trip and take my bike on some off road type trails.

I talked to a sales guy at a local bike shop and he was suggesting either a marin bike(forgot the model) with road tires at about $470; or for a mountain bike, a Kona(forgot the model) at $560. Now I'm somewhat out of the loop on prices and yes I know a model name would make a lot of difference, but what is a reasonable price for a good bike? I'm no expert so I don't need racing or expert bikes, but I'm not sure what a good price range is. I have a feeling this bike shop may be over priced or very specialty. The majority of bikes they had were 500+, and then I see bikes at Sports Authority(and other stores like it) for bikes starting at 250. I guess I just don't know what's worth it. The guy did show me one bike they had that was 260, but he said it was **** and would wear out much faster. How do I know if he was just being a salesman trying to get me to spend?

I have been searching and searching on the net for a good reliable site for bike reviews, but have had a hard time finding one. This is the first site that is actually up to date with content. Does anyone know a good bike review site? Do some brands have a bad name where some are more reliable?

The sales guy told me that if I ever wanted to go on rough trails I should probably pick up a mountain bike. He said that if I wasn't on a rough trail I could always put road tires on, but if I was ever going to do some off road I should get a mountain bike. It made sense to me, but he was also suggesting a more expensive bike. Anyone have an opinion on the direction I should go?

Thanks for any suggestions in advance!!
 

RickF

New Member
Jul 27, 2005
646
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70
Topsi1208 said:
I went with a Hybrid because I thought I would be riding off road some but it turns out I ride almost exclusively on the road. I found out my hybrid is o.k. for hard packed dirt trails but not much else off road. I did ride it on some motor bike trails that run under some power lines, not too steep and it about beat me to death! No suspension on my bike. I haven't taken it off road since! I'm ready to upgrade to a true road bike & my hybrid is up for sale! If I decide to go off road, I will buy a real mountain bike.
There are some off-road trails where hybrids are perfect. In our area, we have some rails-to-trails that are paved with granite screenings. They are in relatively good shape, and the steepest grade is 4%. The major obsticals are horse biscuits, hoof prints, and the occasional washouts. I would not feel comfortable on a road bike with 23 or 25 mm tires on the soft surface, but there is no need for a true mountain bike. Hybrids are perfect on these trails.

As far as prices go, hybrids run between is $300 and $1200. Road bikes start at about $700, and the sky is the limit for the upper end.

The mass merchandise bikes that are available for less than $300 generally have inferior components that do not hold up to rigorous use, and usually are not set up correctly. I ride to work on the bus with a fellow who used to bike to work (about 16 miles each way) on a department store bike. After a few weeks, a bearing in the rear wheel hub siezed and destroyed the hub. The repair bill for the wheel was as much as the bike cost to begin with. I would rather pay the LBS a little more for a bike that fits me, is set up correctly, and will last for many years.
 

Ghost9

New Member
Jun 1, 2006
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I guess i'm debating whether or not 600 for a bike would be worth it for me yet as currently I like in the city. but i don't want some department store bike that's going to fall apart either. Hard to find any real reviews for the cheap bikes.
 

rosborn

New Member
Aug 26, 2004
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Ghost9 said:
I guess i'm debating whether or not 600 for a bike would be worth it for me yet as currently I like in the city. but i don't want some department store bike that's going to fall apart either. Hard to find any real reviews for the cheap bikes.
I would suggest that you deal with your LBS and get a bike that fits you and your needs. The "small" price that you would end up paying, over what the commercial stores offer, will benefit you in the end. In other words, go with what your LBS is telling you. Besides, the commercial store is only interested in selling you a bike off the shelf while the LBS is interested in building a relationship with with you.

Rob
 

RickF

New Member
Jul 27, 2005
646
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70
Ghost9 said:
I guess i'm debating whether or not 600 for a bike would be worth it for me yet as currently I like in the city. but i don't want some department store bike that's going to fall apart either. Hard to find any real reviews for the cheap bikes.
Check out this site: http://www.bikesrnottoys.com/

You do not need to spend $600 to find out if you like it. Entry level Trek or Specialized mountain and hybrid bikes can be found in the $250 to $350 range.
 

Topsi1208

New Member
May 6, 2006
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I agree. The LBS offers so much more in the way of customer service as well help with bike adjustments & tune ups. That service after the sale is well worth it.



RickF said:
There are some off-road trails where hybrids are perfect. In our area, we have some rails-to-trails that are paved with granite screenings. They are in relatively good shape, and the steepest grade is 4%. The major obsticals are horse biscuits, hoof prints, and the occasional washouts. I would not feel comfortable on a road bike with 23 or 25 mm tires on the soft surface, but there is no need for a true mountain bike. Hybrids are perfect on these trails.

As far as prices go, hybrids run between is $300 and $1200. Road bikes start at about $700, and the sky is the limit for the upper end.

The mass merchandise bikes that are available for less than $300 generally have inferior components that do not hold up to rigorous use, and usually are not set up correctly. I ride to work on the bus with a fellow who used to bike to work (about 16 miles each way) on a department store bike. After a few weeks, a bearing in the rear wheel hub siezed and destroyed the hub. The repair bill for the wheel was as much as the bike cost to begin with. I would rather pay the LBS a little more for a bike that fits me, is set up correctly, and will last for many years.