should I or shouldn't I change my bikes...



P

Paul Nevai

Guest
I have several bikes but my 2 favorites are a Bridgestone RB1 and a
Cannondale T1000.

Both are 12+ years old, both have rear luggage racks and shopping baskets
attached to them, both are in essentially perfect condition, both have a
gazillion gizmos such as mirrors, lamps, bike-computers, etc.

The only essential difference is that the Cannondale has fenders and the
Bridgestone doesn't [so I can use the former in rain and winter].

I use both for the same general purpose: commuting, shopping, training, you
name it. Both are 100% fun.

I have not studied new bikes in the last 10+ years.

I realize that could keep my bikes and stay happy for the rest of my life.
However, I could be equally happy if I found bikes which are even better suit
my needs [commuting, shopping, training, etc.].

QUESTION. Are there any bikes you could recommend which would be better than
my current bikes?

I have only 2 condition: must be road bikes and must be able to accommodate
rear racks.

Money? Doesn't matter. Since I keep my bikes forever, money is not an issue.
Only quality, value, and fun-value matter.

Any suggestions?

Best Regards, Paul
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On 26 Apr 2004 17:40:50 GMT, [email protected] (Paul Nevai) may
have said:

>QUESTION. Are there any bikes you could recommend which would be better than
>my current bikes?
>
>I have only 2 condition: must be road bikes and must be able to accommodate
>rear racks.
>
>Money? Doesn't matter. Since I keep my bikes forever, money is not an issue.
>Only quality, value, and fun-value matter.
>
>Any suggestions?


Personally, I would apply the Engineer's Maxim: If it's not broke,
don't fix it. Bike technology fundamentals have changed only very
slightly in the past 12 years, and a lot of the changes are in the
area of bleeding-edge stuff that's really only cost-effective for
highly competitive racing situations, and often isn't durable in
long-term ordinary use.

I do not think you would gain anything by changing bikes. I'd advise
against it.

--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
M

mark

Guest
www.rivendellbicycles.com would be an obvious place to start looking.
Touring/off pavement frame called the Atlantis, road (sport touring) frame
called the Rambouillet, complete sport touring bicycle w/ a less fancy frame
than the Rambouillet called the Romulus, custom frame called the Rivendell.
All are built to accommodate fenders, racks, wider tires than most modern
frames. All are lugged steel.
HTH,
--
mark
"Paul Nevai" wrote
> I have several bikes but my 2 favorites are a Bridgestone RB1 and a
> Cannondale T1000.
>
> Both are 12+ years old, both have rear luggage racks and shopping

baskets
> attached to them, both are in essentially perfect condition, both

have a
> gazillion gizmos such as mirrors, lamps, bike-computers, etc.
>
> The only essential difference is that the Cannondale has fenders and the
> Bridgestone doesn't [so I can use the former in rain and winter].
>
> I use both for the same general purpose: commuting, shopping, training,

you
> name it. Both are 100% fun.
>
> I have not studied new bikes in the last 10+ years.
>
> I realize that could keep my bikes and stay happy for the rest of my life.
> However, I could be equally happy if I found bikes which are even better

suit
> my needs [commuting, shopping, training, etc.].
>
> QUESTION. Are there any bikes you could recommend which would be better

than
> my current bikes?
>
> I have only 2 condition: must be road bikes and must be able to

accommodate
> rear racks.
>
> Money? Doesn't matter. Since I keep my bikes forever, money is not an

issue.
> Only quality, value, and fun-value matter.
>
> Any suggestions?
>
> Best Regards, Paul
 
M

Michael Press

Guest

>QUESTION. Are there any bikes you could recommend which would be better than
>my current bikes?
>
>I have only 2 condition: must be road bikes and must be able to accommodate
>rear racks.


Generally I'd say don't replace perfect bikes with bikes you expect to
somehow be more perfect.

Having said that, I've recently purchased my "perfect" bike for
similar use - all-weather commuting. I got some features that weren't
available on my existing bikes and in fact aren't available on any
bikes except custom (in my case, a custom-fitted Ti racing bike with
disc brakes, fenders and rack. Great when it rains with the fenders
and disc brakes, and great when it doesn't rain with the custom
geometry and racing performance).

Another benefit would be STI, which your 12-year old bikes probably
don't have. I upgraded from downtube shifters to STI a few years back
and wouldn't want to go back.

Michael
 
J

Jay Beattie

Guest
"Paul Nevai" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I have several bikes but my 2 favorites are a Bridgestone RB1

and a
> Cannondale T1000.
>
> Both are 12+ years old, both have rear luggage racks and

shopping baskets
> attached to them, both are in essentially perfect

condition, both have a
> gazillion gizmos such as mirrors, lamps, bike-computers, etc.
>
> The only essential difference is that the Cannondale has

fenders and the
> Bridgestone doesn't [so I can use the former in rain and

winter].
>
> I use both for the same general purpose: commuting, shopping,

training, you
> name it. Both are 100% fun.
>
> I have not studied new bikes in the last 10+ years.
>
> I realize that could keep my bikes and stay happy for the rest

of my life.
> However, I could be equally happy if I found bikes which are

even better suit
> my needs [commuting, shopping, training, etc.].
>
> QUESTION. Are there any bikes you could recommend which would

be better than
> my current bikes?
>
> I have only 2 condition: must be road bikes and must be able to

accommodate
> rear racks.
>
> Money? Doesn't matter. Since I keep my bikes forever, money is

not an issue.
> Only quality, value, and fun-value matter.
>
> Any suggestions?


No, not unless you want a bike that is more upright or one that
can take a 26" wheel. Otherwise, the two bikes you have are the
hands-down bargain tourers. I have an 18 year old T1000 that I
prefer over my custom built (now stolen) steel touring bike. I
cold set the T1000 to 130mm (no easy feat) and have it set up for
8 speed STI. It is a great bike -- somewhat heavy, but the Al
tubing and long wheel-base makes it a super-stable and efficient
climber. -- Jay Beattie.
 
P

Paul Nevai

Guest
"mark" <[email protected]> aszonygya:
:www.rivendellbicycles.com would be an obvious place to start looking.

Funny... The rivendell guy sold me my Bridgestone [12+ years ago] before
Bridgestone left the US market and he formed his own company. I think his
name is Grant Petersen and we have exchanged many e-mails. A very-very nice
guy. He edited the Bridgestone magazines.

Alas, Rivendell is "way to conservative" for me, e.g., bar-end shifters.

Best regards, Paul
 
K

Kyle.B.H

Guest
"Paul Nevai" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "mark" <[email protected]> aszonygya:
> :www.rivendellbicycles.com would be an obvious place to start looking.
>
> Funny... The rivendell guy sold me my Bridgestone [12+ years ago] before
> Bridgestone left the US market and he formed his own company. I think his
> name is Grant Petersen and we have exchanged many e-mails. A very-very

nice
> guy. He edited the Bridgestone magazines.
>
> Alas, Rivendell is "way to conservative" for me, e.g., bar-end shifters.


They'll gladly build you a bike with STI/Ergo shifters, just ask. Look at
their owners' gallery - many of those have integrated shifters and other
modern ammenities. If you're looking for a bike as practical and durable as
your current rides, you won't find one as finely crafted and beautiful as a
Rivendell.

BTW - I have a beautiful, modern, hand-made steel sport touring bike, which
receives the majority of my miles, but the steed that gets the most rides by
far is my "poor man's Rivendell", a lugged 1980's Nishiki with moustache
bars, fenders, a rack, and 7 speed bar-ends. Some day (if they're is still
around in a decade or two) that bike will be a Rivendell.


Kyle
 
T

Terry Morse

Guest
Paul Nevai wrote:

> Alas, Rivendell is "way to conservative" for me, e.g., bar-end shifters.


Paul,

You can buy just the frame from Rivendell and bolt whatever
components you want onto it. The only components you're probably
"stuck with" are the standard reach Shimano brakes. The short reach
ones won't reach the rim.

terry
 
E

Ed

Guest
Paul Nevai says...
>
>I have several bikes but my 2 favorites are a Bridgestone RB1 and a
>Cannondale T1000.
>
>Both are 12+ years old, both have rear luggage racks and shopping baskets
>attached to them, both are in essentially perfect condition, both have a
>gazillion gizmos such as mirrors, lamps, bike-computers, etc.


I agree with the earlier replies, unless you race there is
little to be gained in performance by replacing your bikes.
If you do not already have them look at STI shifter/brakes and
clipless pedals.

Appearence is another matter and this newsgroup has experts who
might jump in to advise you.

I have a 1988 Cannondale road bike and a 1999 Trek touring bike
and use both about equally. I like to switch betweem them because
the bikes feel different. The road bike feels faster and more
responsive, the touring bike smoother and also has racks and fenders.
You might consider another type of bike, even a recumbent,
for variety.
 
A

ari

Guest
I would test drive some new ones and see if the benefit is worth the
added cost.

Paul Nevai wrote:

>I have several bikes but my 2 favorites are a Bridgestone RB1 and a
>Cannondale T1000.
>
>Both are 12+ years old, both have rear luggage racks and shopping baskets
>attached to them, both are in essentially perfect condition, both have a
>gazillion gizmos such as mirrors, lamps, bike-computers, etc.
>
>The only essential difference is that the Cannondale has fenders and the
>Bridgestone doesn't [so I can use the former in rain and winter].
>
>I use both for the same general purpose: commuting, shopping, training, you
>name it. Both are 100% fun.
>
>I have not studied new bikes in the last 10+ years.
>
>I realize that could keep my bikes and stay happy for the rest of my life.
>However, I could be equally happy if I found bikes which are even better suit
>my needs [commuting, shopping, training, etc.].
>
>QUESTION. Are there any bikes you could recommend which would be better than
>my current bikes?
>
>I have only 2 condition: must be road bikes and must be able to accommodate
>rear racks.
>
>Money? Doesn't matter. Since I keep my bikes forever, money is not an issue.
>Only quality, value, and fun-value matter.
>
>Any suggestions?
>
>Best Regards, Paul
>
>
 
A

andres muro

Guest
[email protected] (Paul Nevai) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

>
> QUESTION. Are there any bikes you could recommend which would be better than
> my current bikes?


No. There are lighter bikes, but you will not notice any difference
while riding. They have more gears, but if you don't notice that you
need more, then you don't need more.
>
> I have only 2 condition: must be road bikes and must be able to accommodate
> rear racks.
>
> Money? Doesn't matter. Since I keep my bikes forever, money is not an issue.
> Only quality, value, and fun-value matter.


Some people get exited and like the idea of getting something new.
This part is fun, but after a while, it looses the exitment. If you
are happy with what you have, keep it. I consider the bridgestone a
great bike but any standards. I would save the mnoney and spend it in
going to cancun with the bikes.

Andres
>
> Any suggestions?
>
> Best Regards, Paul