Shoulder Ache

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by Guest, Jul 21, 2002.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    You know I'm a new roadie (and loving it) but I need help, as my distances get longer and the time in the saddle increases I now find that I am beginning to suffer from shoulder ache (sometimes very painful).

    Whilst I know it's difficult to correct my riding position without actually seeing me ride, can anybody help me by pointing out what I should be looking out for.

    Thanks

    Laz
     
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  2. Vo2

    Vo2 Member

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    Laz, those handlebars are too low, mate. Remember that with your MTB you sat in a much more upright position, so you are not used to a road geometry.

    First of all, make sure your seat height is correct. Click here for a simple procedure on setting up your seat height. Next, adjust your handlebars so that they are about an inch lower than the top of the saddle. Remember, this is just a basic guideline.
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Thanks Vo2 I've checked the seat height and it's right but I've raised the bars.

    Because I find Road biking far more constant and the intensity is greater, it's taking me longer to recover than it does on a mtb, but I'll give it a go tomorrow (more pain ;D)

    Once again thanks

    Laz
     
  4. Vo2

    Vo2 Member

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    Laz, remember that this is just a guideline. You could find that after a few months on the new bike you may want to lower the bars again to achieve a more "aero" position. Resist the temptation to go "aero" until you are completely comfortable on the bike. Your elbows should be slightly bent and your shoulders relaxed (not hunched up).
    And remember the golden rule: SMALL ADJUSTMENTS OVER A PERIOD OF TIME.
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Try going down the gym for a few months and doing some specific exercises for strengthening your shoulders. If the ache is at the base of the neck its because you have to hold up your head and therefore you will need to do exercises aimed at your back. If its in the shoulders themselves work on all of the muscles in that area i.e. triceps, biceps, delts, lats, pecs, etc.

    See if that helps. Has someone expeianced looked at your setup and I don't just mean the kid in the bike shop? ;)
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    2lap, the bike shop owner helped me set the bike up, but to be honest I've been doing what Vo2 has just advised me in his last post. I've been adjusting things little by little after every ride - moving seat back/forward,up/down and only slightly adjusting the bars, maybe I went to far somewhere along the way and then the shoulder pain started.

    The gym is something I'll have to see about,because I'm skinnier than a gypsy's dog and it wouldn't do any harm to have some muscle on my arms and shoulders to go with the muscles on my legs (though they haven't got much :D).
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Good luck and take it easy in the gym. I'm a skinny guy too and get shoulder ache when I change to my racing bike or TT bike with their extreme positions!

    After a few rides my neck and back strengthen up and can take the stress of my big head (thick skull, small brain)!
     
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