shouldn't the bike manufactuers start a cycling channel ?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Laz, Sep 15, 2005.

  1. Laz

    Laz Guest

    just wondering, we are all expecting fools at oln to give us racing
    coverage, but they never will. so, lets try to get the bike industry to
    start a cycling channel. it shouldn't cost too much especially if the cost
    is collectively shared and they could expect a boost in revenues as coverage
    should lead to greater interest and acceptance of the sport, increasing
    advertising and team sponsorship.

    thoughts ?

    Laz
     
    Tags:


  2. Tom

    Tom Guest

    Yeah that makes about as much sense as a car maker to start making
    vaccuum cleaners.

    Bike manufacturers make bikes, not TV stations.

    Get over it. Cycling is, and always will be a fringe sport in
    America. We have the internet. You can read coverage of just about
    every race in the world somewhere.

    Running TV stations is expensive, and aren't companies in it to MAKE
    money, not shell it out on useless wasteful projects? Yes, yes
    indeed they are.

    Tom
     
  3. Laz wrote:
    > just wondering, we are all expecting fools at oln to give us racing
    > coverage, but they never will. so, lets try to get the bike industry to
    > start a cycling channel. it shouldn't cost too much especially if the cost
    > is collectively shared and they could expect a boost in revenues as coverage
    > should lead to greater interest and acceptance of the sport, increasing
    > advertising and team sponsorship.
    >
    > thoughts ?





    Goddamm, that is stupid.

    The market has spoken. Only the TdF and a few other classics attract
    enough viewers.


    thanks,

    K. Gringioni.
     
  4. Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    > Laz wrote:
    > > just wondering, we are all expecting fools at oln to give us racing
    > > coverage, but they never will. so, lets try to get the bike industry to
    > > start a cycling channel. it shouldn't cost too much especially if the cost
    > > is collectively shared and they could expect a boost in revenues as coverage
    > > should lead to greater interest and acceptance of the sport, increasing
    > > advertising and team sponsorship.
    > >
    > > thoughts ?

    >
    >
    > Goddamm, that is stupid.
    >
    > The market has spoken. Only the TdF and a few other classics attract
    > enough viewers.
    >
    >
    > thanks,
    >
    > K. Gringioni.


    Prediction for '06 - If Lance doesn't race, Tour coverage will be one
    hour highlight shows Sat and Sun shown once each day - non prime time.
     
  5. The folks at OLN are not fools. They took a channel that had a very
    limited audience and figured out a way to attract another (completely
    different) audience and significantly boost their ratings overall.
    Before the Tour, they were pretty much just showing repeats in July to
    an audience that was mostly all away on vacation. By August, their
    normal audience is starved for Bassmasters and that boosts their August
    ratings. The TV industry should give OLN's CEO an award for good
    thinking.

    And you benefitted too. They gave you first-rate, live coverage that
    you've NEVER seen before in the USA. Feel lucky that you even got any
    Vuelta and Giro coverage at all, because those were also firsts in the
    USA. CBS, NBC, ABC, ESPN...None of them ever covered the Giro or
    Vuelta, not even in delayed broadcast.

    Besides: America is a land of fat-asses. The only thing they can
    generally appreciate about bike racing is that it's tough, and the Tour
    adequately reminds them of that every year. America is getting its
    fill already. As Kurgan said: The market has spoken already. OLN is
    a channel that almost no one watched before they carried the Tour. For
    a channel like them to drop a cycling event because of poor ratings is
    really saying something.
     
  6. Laz, that's an interesting idea, notwithstanding the shitbrain
    responses that have been posted. The bike companies would not, of
    course, operate such a channel, they would only put up the $$ to back
    it. The cost would be extremely low, since 95% of the programming
    would be re-showing past races. Have you checked out cycling.tv? It is
    a 24hr cycling channel on the web that covers road, cross, mtb,
    interviews etc. As long as you have high speed net access, it serves
    the purpose you describe. The only drawback is the reduced size of the
    screen. It clearly gets its advertising funding from bike
    manufacturers, shops, nutrition products, etc.

    This crap about "the market has already spoken" is just that, crap.
    That's like saying "don't going throwing new ideas into the
    marketplace, people don't want it - after all, innovative, creative
    ideas never catch on."
     
  7. I volunteer you to be the venture capitalist to fund such a new
    channel. Laz can be CEO.

    With cycling.tv's stellar revenues as a projection model, you just
    can't lose!
     
  8. [email protected] wrote:
    > Laz, that's an interesting idea, notwithstanding the shitbrain
    > responses that have been posted. The bike companies would not, of
    > course, operate such a channel, they would only put up the $$ to back
    > it. The cost would be extremely low, since 95% of the programming
    > would be re-showing past races. Have you checked out cycling.tv?


    The TV channel has to pay the races for the right to show them.
    cycling.tv presumably has to pay less for web rights, and even
    then they don't show the biggest races. Then the TV channel
    has to persuade cable companies to carry it. There are still
    a limited number of cable channels. And most people beyond us
    fanatics aren't going to spend a lot of time watching old races.

    When bandwidth makes quality streaming TV realistic, or at least
    as available as streaming radio is now, then special purpose
    channels like this will probably spring up.

    I don't know what the budget or capitalization of OLN is since
    it is part of Comcast, but I bet it is significantly larger than
    any US bike company. Bike companies are a marginal business.
    Expecting them to underwrite a TV channel is unrealistic even
    if the channel eventually turned a profit.
     
  9. I actually prefer it the way we have it now. If the news stream became
    dominated by broadcasters, the smaller peeps like velonews would go
    away and not bother anymore. Because I have to read my most of my
    news, I feel it is more comprehensive.
     
  10. Maybe instead I'll throw around a little MBA jargon to give the false
    impression that I know what I'm talking about. Yeah, that's a great
    idea!
     
  11. Laz Sep 15, 10:03 am show options

    Newsgroups: rec.bicycles.racing
    From: "Laz" <[email protected]> - Find messages by this author
    Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2005 10:03:09 -0400
    Local: Thurs, Sep 15 2005 10:03 am
    Subject: shouldn't the bike manufactuers start a cycling channel ?
    Reply | Reply to Author | Forward | Print | Individual Message | Show
    original | Report Abuse

    just wondering, we are all expecting fools at oln to give us racing
    coverage, but they never will. so, lets try to get the bike industry to

    start a cycling channel. it shouldn't cost too much especially if the
    cost
    is collectively shared and they could expect a boost in revenues as
    coverage
    should lead to greater interest and acceptance of the sport, increasing

    advertising and team sponsorship.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------

    well, to a certain extent, we've seen that with the whole
    Lance/Trek/OLN/Carmichael/ bundle, the OLN
    coverage was partly financed by the cycling industry, who
    sold millions of Treks as a result - but that is gone
    for now, since it was held together by Lance's popularity.
    but other reasons include:
    - There is not much money in the USA bike industry, it's not like
    car maufacturers. It's kind of a "hobbyist" industry, like
    RC cars or something like that, ...bikes are mostly
    made in china and taiwan, or they are a few american
    "boutique" makers, who aren't gonna have money
    to give to a cycling channel few people are gonna watch
    and will lose money - people involved in the USA cycling
    industry like to KEEP the slim profits, if you've ever been involved
    in getting sponsorship you know that getting cash from anyone
    in the cycling industry is close to impossible unless
    you are one of the top three pro teams, they are
    very generous with equipment and they do support the sport
    better than in some other non-traditional cycling countries,
    where even equipment is hard to get.

    They also know that you are gonna watch whatever
    you get - even 15 minutes
    of tour coverage on ESPN like it used to be, so they
    can just invest in a commercial there and reach
    %100 of their target audience .


    I worked in a few bike shops, and most make a living
    selling $250-$500 bikes, with a few display $1200
    shimano 105 bikes, you have your exceptions,
    in San Francisco, Boulder and other areas,
    but the economics of cycling are kinda weird -
    there is the "gym membership" thing - %80
    of the bikes you sell to adults aren't really
    gonna be used much anyway, they will sit in a garage
    anyway. BMX bikes for kids is more profitable,
    they go through a few every couple years.
    Bike shop owners and reps and everyone in
    the bike industry think of 'road racers' very cynically:
    you want everything free or pro-deal,
    you order mail order off the net, you are
    very fickle and want only the newest
    lightest stuff, and then when it breaks
    you want a new one. They hate you.
    They want to sell bikes to a fat dude who
    is gonna ride the bike path, realize it hurts
    his butt, and then hang it in the garage.
    There are many more of these guys than
    you...
    they do like the elite guys to ride their
    stuff because it legitimizes it, but they
    don't make any money at all off that -
    it's just advertising really, used to add
    prestige to an entire brand (Trek,
    Cannondale, Spez) so they can
    sell more of the cheap stuff to bike
    path freds.

    so a cycling channel isn't going to sell more bikes,
    maybe a small amount of high end bikes, but
    the average US cyclist is not one of us,
    they don't spend thousands on bike gear,
    and race, and obsess on the sport - we
    are a very small group of people.
    Look at licensed racers in the USA, the
    numbers are very small, and I can't see
    that many non-racers cracking open
    a bud on sunday and watching paris-
    brussels.

    the only way to make it a "mainstream"
    sport is to extremify it - like the X-games,
    Mountain Dew, Nascar style - made
    up rivalries (Floyd Landis screaming at
    Levi Leipheimer after a stage, WWF
    style trach talking, etc). The only sports
    that have become popular in the last
    10 years in the USA have been EXTREME.

    remember the usa pro city league?
    where each city had a pro team and
    they'd do crits and like beat up on each
    other back in the early 90s?
    yeah...that didn't work. so it's been tried.
     
  12. Yes, it was funny to watch Mike McCarthy and his buddies duking it out
    each week on late night TV as they rode laps around spectator-free
    courses. The majority of viewers that did see it thought they were
    going to see a tractor pull instead and could only choose between that
    and Tom Vu.

    I myself usually chose Tom Vu and his bikini clad entourage.
     
  13. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > Bike shop owners and reps and everyone in
    > the bike industry think of 'road racers' very cynically:
    > you want everything free or pro-deal,
    > you order mail order off the net, you are
    > very fickle and want only the newest
    > lightest stuff, and then when it breaks
    > you want a new one. They hate you.


    The bike shop owners I've worked with (and around) agree with that, but you
    know, they hate triathletes even more. Those guys seem to be even fussier, and
    you just can't make any money because of the time that gets spent nursing them
    through a sale. ANY sale...

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    Butter is love.

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  14. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > Yes, it was funny to watch Mike McCarthy and his buddies duking it out
    > each week on late night TV as they rode laps around spectator-free
    > courses.


    Didn't Fran Tarkington own one of the teams? I remember when they did a cover
    article on that league in Winning Magazine, they put him on the cover. That is,
    if it was him - I'm certain it was an ex-football player.

    > The majority of viewers that did see it thought they were
    > going to see a tractor pull instead and could only choose between that
    > and Tom Vu.
    >
    > I myself usually chose Tom Vu and his bikini clad entourage.


    Haha, it was pretty funny to see that guy on some big-ass boat with a bunch
    of Silicone Sallys.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    Butter is love.

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  15. Howard Kveck wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > Yes, it was funny to watch Mike McCarthy and his buddies duking it out
    > > each week on late night TV as they rode laps around spectator-free
    > > courses.

    >
    > Didn't Fran Tarkington own one of the teams? I remember when they did a cover
    > article on that league in Winning Magazine, they put him on the cover. That is,
    > if it was him - I'm certain it was an ex-football player.
    >


    Franco Harris. He owned the Pittsburgh franchise, of course.
     
  16. Carl Sundquist Sep 15, 10:05 pm show options

    Howard Kveck wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] wrote:


    > > Yes, it was funny to watch Mike McCarthy and his buddies duking it out
    > > each week on late night TV as they rode laps around spectator-free
    > > courses.



    > Didn't Fran Tarkington own one of the teams? I remember when they did a cover
    > article on that league in Winning Magazine, they put him on the cover. That is,
    > if it was him - I'm certain it was an ex-football player.


    ---------------------------------------------
    carl -
    were you on a team? I remember seeing an article with a carney
    and some other guys doing it, LA wings, bunch of other teams.
    I think wordin was even a rider...
    where is wordin these days?
     
  17. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Carl Sundquist" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Howard Kveck wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > [email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > > > Yes, it was funny to watch Mike McCarthy and his buddies duking it out
    > > > each week on late night TV as they rode laps around spectator-free
    > > > courses.

    > >
    > > Didn't Fran Tarkington own one of the teams? I remember when they did a
    > > cover
    > > article on that league in Winning Magazine, they put him on the cover. That
    > > is,
    > > if it was him - I'm certain it was an ex-football player.
    > >

    >
    > Franco Harris. He owned the Pittsburgh franchise, of course.


    That's the guy. Thanks, Carl. I guess I got those two mixed up because all
    football players look alike.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    Butter is love.

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  18. Donald Munro

    Donald Munro Guest

    mike wrote:
    >> Bike shop owners and reps and everyone in
    >> the bike industry think of 'road racers' very cynically:
    >> you want everything free or pro-deal,
    >> you order mail order off the net, you are
    >> very fickle and want only the newest
    >> lightest stuff, and then when it breaks
    >> you want a new one. They hate you.


    Howard Kveck wrote:
    > The bike shop owners I've worked with (and around) agree with that, but you
    > know, they hate triathletes even more. Those guys seem to be even fussier, and
    > you just can't make any money because of the time that gets spent nursing them
    > through a sale. ANY sale...


    WADA hates them too after one of them messed up their EPO test.
     
  19. Laz wrote:

    > Cycling is boring ? No it's not. It is as least as exciting as F1.




    Dumbass -

    You've got your head up your ass.

    F1, to the typical American viewer, is boring, as is cycling.

    The problem with road racing is it generally doesn't televise that
    well. Great in person, televises like crap. Mountain climbs, for
    instance, don't look steep in 2 dimensions.

    Hence the lack of success of Grand Tour telecasts outside of the TdF
    (which have all been cancelled by OLN).


    good luck w/ your delusions,

    K. Gringioni.
     
  20. Tom

    Tom Guest

    I didn't say watching cycling was boring to you, but yes, to most of
    the American public it is. And as Kurgan says below, so is F1.
    Fringe sports my friend, fringe sports that don't carry a lot of
    interest or viewership in America, and they never will. That's the
    bottom line really.

    I would rather watch cycling, but most of the American public would
    rather watch reality TV. Ratings have proven this out. When was the
    last time a Tour de France stage, or any bike race for that matter,
    took in 30 million viewers in the US? I'm betting that would be, umm,
    never. American Idol (stupid ass show) does that every week. So what
    would you show to maximize your profits? Exactly.

    Be realistic. Cycling, does not sell in America.

    Tom
     
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