Show Turkeys

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Paul F Austin, Dec 17, 2003.

  1. The Washington Post revealed the awful truth in today's Editorial Page: that you can't cook a turkey
    that tastes good and looks great.

    Them folks don't know how to toast a turkey. _My_ turkeys come out picture perfect, moist and tasty.

    I slow-roast my turkey overnight with total cooking time of about 10 hours. I prepare the turkey by
    cleaning out the cavity with two gallons of boiling water then stuff it. After stuffing, I rub the
    skin with sage, pepper and soy sauce (secret tanning formula). I put the turkey on a roasting rack
    and fill the (open) roasting pan with onions, carrots and celery and about half a gallon of
    industrial grade Chablis.

    After heating the oven to Incandescent, I throw the turkey on the fire, wait until the oven is back
    up to temperature then tent the turkey with foil and turn the oven down to 275. And go to bed.

    In the morning, I remove the foil and continue cooking until the internal temperature is up to 185,
    then I turn the oven off and let the beast rest. After cooling, I put the turkey on a cutting board
    for display and separate the drippings for gravy. The Chablis makes_terrific_gravy.

    This method always results in a beautiful, moist turkey that you don't have to hover over.
     
    Tags:


  2. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sat, 6 Dec 2003 07:35:53 -0500, "Paul F Austin"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >After heating the oven to Incandescent, I throw the turkey on the fire, wait until the oven is back
    >up to temperature then tent the turkey with foil and turn the oven down to 275. And go to bed.
    >
    >In the morning, I remove the foil and continue cooking until the internal temperature is up to 185,

    275 for 10 hours...internal temp of 185? Ugh.

    -sw
     
  3. Mokosh

    Mokosh Guest

    Paul F Austin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%%[email protected]...
    > The Washington Post revealed the awful truth in today's Editorial Page:
    that
    > you can't cook a turkey that tastes good and looks great.
    >
    > Them folks don't know how to toast a turkey. _My_ turkeys come out picture perfect, moist
    > and tasty.
    >
    > I slow-roast my turkey overnight with total cooking time of about 10
    hours.
    > I prepare the turkey by cleaning out the cavity with two gallons of
    boiling
    > water then stuff it. After stuffing, I rub the skin with sage, pepper and soy sauce (secret
    > tanning formula). I put the turkey on a roasting rack
    and
    > fill the (open) roasting pan with onions, carrots and celery and about
    half
    > a gallon of industrial grade Chablis.
    >
    > After heating the oven to Incandescent, I throw the turkey on the fire,
    wait
    > until the oven is back up to temperature then tent the turkey with foil
    and
    > turn the oven down to 275. And go to bed.
    >
    > In the morning, I remove the foil and continue cooking until the internal temperature is up to
    > 185, then I turn the oven off and let the beast rest. After cooling, I put the turkey on a cutting
    > board for display and
    separate
    > the drippings for gravy. The Chablis makes_terrific_gravy.
    >
    > This method always results in a beautiful, moist turkey that you don't
    have
    > to hover over.

    When I cook a turkey, I want the skin to be crackly-crisp and the meat sliceable, not falling off
    the bone in shreds. Does your method produce that? MJ
     
  4. Louis Cohen

    Louis Cohen Guest

    Agreed. Disgusting.

    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----
    Louis Cohen Living la vida loca at N37° 43' 7.9" W122° 8' 42.8"

    Bah! Humbug!

    "Steve Wertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:ZL-dnS0R6vBUfUyiRVn-
    [email protected]
    > On Sat, 6 Dec 2003 07:35:53 -0500, "Paul F Austin" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >After heating the oven to Incandescent, I throw the turkey on the fire,
    wait
    > >until the oven is back up to temperature then tent the turkey with foil
    and
    > >turn the oven down to 275. And go to bed.
    > >
    > >In the morning, I remove the foil and continue cooking until the internal temperature is up
    > >to 185,
    >
    > 275 for 10 hours...internal temp of 185? Ugh.
    >
    > -sw
     
  5. "Mokosh" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Paul F Austin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:%%[email protected]...
    > > The Washington Post revealed the awful truth in today's Editorial Page:
    > that
    > > you can't cook a turkey that tastes good and looks great.
    > >
    > > Them folks don't know how to toast a turkey. _My_ turkeys come out
    picture
    > > perfect, moist and tasty.
    > >
    > > I slow-roast my turkey overnight with total cooking time of about 10
    > hours.
    > > I prepare the turkey by cleaning out the cavity with two gallons of
    > boiling
    > > water then stuff it. After stuffing, I rub the skin with sage, pepper
    and
    > > soy sauce (secret tanning formula). I put the turkey on a roasting rack
    > and
    > > fill the (open) roasting pan with onions, carrots and celery and about
    > half
    > > a gallon of industrial grade Chablis.
    > >
    > > After heating the oven to Incandescent, I throw the turkey on the fire,
    > wait
    > > until the oven is back up to temperature then tent the turkey with foil
    > and
    > > turn the oven down to 275. And go to bed.
    > >
    > > In the morning, I remove the foil and continue cooking until the
    internal
    > > temperature is up to 185, then I turn the oven off and let the beast
    rest.
    > > After cooling, I put the turkey on a cutting board for display and
    > separate
    > > the drippings for gravy. The Chablis makes_terrific_gravy.
    > >
    > > This method always results in a beautiful, moist turkey that you don't
    > have
    > > to hover over.
    >
    > When I cook a turkey, I want the skin to be crackly-crisp and the meat sliceable, not falling off
    > the bone in shreds. Does your method produce that?

    Yep. The skin is brown and crips and the white meat slices very well although the dark meat is
    "falling off the bone". I tried various bag-turkey methods and was repelled by the white, white skin
    and the boiled-turkey texture.
     
  6. "Louis Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s51...
    > Agreed. Disgusting.
    >
    > --
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    --
    > ----
    > Louis Cohen
    > Living la vida loca at N37° 43' 7.9" W122° 8' 42.8"
    >
    > Bah! Humbug!
    >
    > "Steve Wertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > On Sat, 6 Dec 2003 07:35:53 -0500, "Paul F Austin"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > >After heating the oven to Incandescent, I throw the turkey on the fire,
    > wait
    > > >until the oven is back up to temperature then tent the turkey with foil
    > and
    > > >turn the oven down to 275. And go to bed.
    > > >
    > > >In the morning, I remove the foil and continue cooking until the
    internal
    > > >temperature is up to 185,
    > >
    > > 275 for 10 hours...internal temp of 185? Ugh.
    > >
    > > -sw

    Been doing it for years. Everyone likes it and no complaints. The
    cavity-wash is a key though.
     
  7. Tntyz

    Tntyz Guest

    "Paul F Austin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Mokosh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:vIadnUcrDseqckyiRVn-
    > [email protected]
    > > Paul F Austin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:%%[email protected]...
    > > > The Washington Post revealed the awful truth in today's Editorial
    Page:
    > > that
    > > > you can't cook a turkey that tastes good and looks great.
    > > >
    > > > Them folks don't know how to toast a turkey. _My_ turkeys come out
    > picture
    > > > perfect, moist and tasty.
    > > >
    > > > I slow-roast my turkey overnight with total cooking time of about 10
    > > hours.
    > > > I prepare the turkey by cleaning out the cavity with two gallons of
    > > boiling
    > > > water then stuff it. After stuffing, I rub the skin with sage, pepper
    > and
    > > > soy sauce (secret tanning formula). I put the turkey on a roasting
    rack
    > > and
    > > > fill the (open) roasting pan with onions, carrots and celery and about
    > > half
    > > > a gallon of industrial grade Chablis.
    > > >
    > > > After heating the oven to Incandescent, I throw the turkey on the
    fire,
    > > wait
    > > > until the oven is back up to temperature then tent the turkey with
    foil
    > > and
    > > > turn the oven down to 275. And go to bed.
    > > >
    > > > In the morning, I remove the foil and continue cooking until the
    > internal
    > > > temperature is up to 185, then I turn the oven off and let the beast
    > rest.
    > > > After cooling, I put the turkey on a cutting board for display and
    > > separate
    > > > the drippings for gravy. The Chablis makes_terrific_gravy.
    > > >
    > > > This method always results in a beautiful, moist turkey that you don't
    > > have
    > > > to hover over.
    > >
    > > When I cook a turkey, I want the skin to be crackly-crisp and the meat sliceable, not falling
    > > off the bone in shreds. Does your method produce that?
    >
    > Yep. The skin is brown and crips and the white meat slices very well although the dark meat is
    > "falling off the bone". I tried various bag-turkey methods and was repelled by the white, white
    > skin and the boiled-turkey texture.
    >
    >
    What about food safety? 10 hours seems like a long incubation period to me. I thought the rule
    of thumb was "4 hours between 40 and 140"? How fast do you think the turkey's getting into the
    140 range?
     
  8. "TNTYZ" wrote
    >
    > "Paul F Austin" wrote
    > >
    > > "Mokosh" wrote
    > > > Paul F Austin" wrote
    > > > > The Washington Post revealed the awful truth in today's Editorial
    > Page:
    > > > that
    > > > > you can't cook a turkey that tastes good and looks great.
    > > > >
    > > > > Them folks don't know how to toast a turkey. _My_ turkeys come out
    > > picture
    > > > > perfect, moist and tasty.
    > > > >
    > > > > I slow-roast my turkey overnight with total cooking time of about 10
    > > > hours.
    > > > > I prepare the turkey by cleaning out the cavity with two gallons of
    > > > boiling
    > > > > water then stuff it. After stuffing, I rub the skin with sage,
    pepper
    > > and
    > > > > soy sauce (secret tanning formula). I put the turkey on a roasting
    > rack
    > > > and
    > > > > fill the (open) roasting pan with onions, carrots and celery and
    about
    > > > half
    > > > > a gallon of industrial grade Chablis.
    > > > >
    > > > > After heating the oven to Incandescent, I throw the turkey on the
    > fire,
    > > > wait
    > > > > until the oven is back up to temperature then tent the turkey with
    > foil
    > > > and
    > > > > turn the oven down to 275. And go to bed.
    > > > >
    > > > > In the morning, I remove the foil and continue cooking until the
    > > internal
    > > > > temperature is up to 185, then I turn the oven off and let the beast
    > > rest.
    > > > > After cooling, I put the turkey on a cutting board for display and
    > > > separate
    > > > > the drippings for gravy. The Chablis makes_terrific_gravy.
    > > > >
    > > > > This method always results in a beautiful, moist turkey that you
    don't
    > > > have
    > > > > to hover over.
    > > >
    > > > When I cook a turkey, I want the skin to be crackly-crisp and the meat sliceable, not falling
    > > > off the bone in shreds. Does your method
    produce
    > > > that?
    > >
    > > Yep. The skin is brown and crips and the white meat slices very well although the dark meat is
    > > "falling off the bone". I tried various bag-turkey methods and was repelled by the white, white
    > > skin and the boiled-turkey texture.
    > >
    > >
    > What about food safety? 10 hours seems like a long incubation period to
    me.
    > I thought the rule of thumb was "4 hours between 40 and 140"? How fast do you think the turkey's
    > getting into the 140 range?

    I've used this slow-cooking method for about ten years with no problems with turkeys as large as 26
    pounds (I like big turkeys). I do use three rules: no uncooked material in the stuffing, I sear the
    turkey in the oven initially and I wash the cavity thoroughly with boiling water.

    Personally, I'm all in favor of installing a gamma cell in every slaughterhouse to kill food
    pathogens.
     
Loading...