Shox/fork measurements?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by mortimer, Jul 31, 2007.

  1. mortimer

    mortimer New Member

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    ok, i'm new to this so please be understanding. I have an old GT Tequesta from '92 i beleive. In great condition. Have had it since it was new. Anyway I really like this bike but since it has no suspension what so ever I am looking at forks. Rockshox, Manitou or whatever. Problem is the sizes are a bit confusing. I still have my brochure when I was looking for the bike way back when. It does say that it is 1 1/8" oversize sealed mech. Don't know what the sealed mech means. And doesn't give a length for the stem. How can I measure it And anything else I need to look for. I tried emailing GT but they have no information before 2000 or something like that. Thanks
     
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  2. mortimer

    mortimer New Member

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    Can anyone help me here please?
     
  3. Scotty_Dog

    Scotty_Dog New Member

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    I believe you currently have a threadless 1-1/8" headset and fork combo, but it wouldn't hurt to disassemble and measure it. If it is in fact 1-1/8" threadless, you could replace it with virtually any modern suspension fork with rim brake bosses. To keep the frame geometry somewhat normal, choose a fork with minimal total travel.

    On another note, good suspension forks can easily cost $250 and up. I wouldn't spend that money on a 15 year old bike with 15 year old components and technology. I'd keep your bike as is, making minimal repairs only when needed, and save your money for a newer bike.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Actually, you probably have a threaded fork.

    What you need is the suspension fork of your choice + a threadless headset (e.g., Cane Creek ... good value for the money) + threadless stem.

    You will find that the geometry of your current frame + a suspension fork actually mimics the geometry of most new hardtails (few that they are, now) ... which should tell you that the geometry of most currently available hardtails wasn't changed when suspension forks were added ... at least, that is what I "discovered" when I updated my comparably old Trek.

    FWIW. I recommend Marzocchi.
     
  5. Scotty_Dog

    Scotty_Dog New Member

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    After a quick search, you do probably have a threaded fork. You also probably have center pull cantilever brakes.

    Now, more than before, I maintain spending $250+ on a new fork, $50+ on a new headset/stem, and $20 on a brake adapter is a waste of money.

    Take that $320 and buy a nice used hardtail from 2004, or a new off-brand like this: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/motobecane_400HT07.htm
     
  6. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, it's a tough call whether or not to upgrade ANY bike ...

    The advantage of upgrading your GT is that you can generally get a better fork for the money, new-or-used, than the used hardtail will have ... particularly, since most low-to-mid-range hardtails often come with barely acceptable forks (i.e., too bouncy).

    If you buy a reasonably "good" fork, you always keep-it-and-use-it on almost any future (if ever) MTB you might end up getting.
     
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