Signalling to overtake cyclists



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S

Simon Galgut

Guest
Is this a Good Thing ?

I have always signalled and given cyclists loads of space when passing (at least I have since I
started cycling :) ). However I have recently had to modify this behaviour to take into account
the moron in the vehicle behind and the particular stretch of road being travelled at the time.
When on a road in the country with no significant turnings to the right signalling is not a
problem, but in town when moving slowly and with turnoffs to the right it is inevitable that moron
behind thinks that the slow-moving PiTA in the Land Rover in front (that'll be me then) is about to
turn right and get out of the way. The upshot of which is a near collision between said moron as
they move to the left to squeeze past me, and the bike I have just overtaken. I now only signal
when not in town and would like to know if this is correct / stupid / recommended or what other
course of action is sensible.

Regards Simon
 
J

Just Zis Guy

Guest
On Thu, 13 Feb 2003 22:06:55 -0000, "Simon Galgut" <[email protected]> wrote:

>I now only signal when not in town and would like to know if this is correct / stupid / recommended
>or what other course of action is sensible.

I reckon that if your intention to overtake is unambiguous you shouldn't worry. The main thing is
not to come into conflict with other road users - if a signal helps to prevent this, then give one;
if it doesn't, don't. Well, that's my £0.02 anyway.

Guy
===
** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
dynamic DNS permitting)
NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
work. Apologies.
 
P

Paul - XXX

Guest
Simon Galgut deftly scribbled:

> Is this a Good Thing ?
>
> I have always signalled and given cyclists loads of space when passing (at least I have since I
> started cycling :) ). However I have recently had to modify this behaviour to take into account
> the moron in the vehicle behind and the particular stretch of road being travelled at the time.
> When on a road in the country with no significant turnings to the right signalling is not a
> problem, but in town when moving slowly and with turnoffs to the right it is inevitable that moron
> behind thinks that the slow-moving PiTA in the Land Rover in front (that'll be me then) is about
> to turn right and get out of the way. The upshot of which is a near collision between said moron
> as they move to the left to squeeze past me, and the bike I have just overtaken. I now only signal
> when not in town and would like to know if this is correct / stupid / recommended or what other
> course of action is sensible.
>
> Regards Simon

If the signal you give could confuse others (Can car drivers be easily confused ?) then I'd say
don't give a signal.

--
...................................Paul-*** Seti 1417 wu in 10303 hours
http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/ http://graffiti.virgin.net/ar.sole/Index.htm
 
A

Adrian Boliston

Guest
"Simon Galgut" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

> Is this a Good Thing ?

When I'm passing a slower cyclist on my cycle I would *not* normally indicate as (much to the
annoyance of cagers) I will have moved out into the overtaking position WELL before I get anywhere
near the slower cyclist, so by the time I actually approach the cyclist I am not moving to the
right, but simply continuting my current course (as per my previous post!).

Generally I reserve a right signal for changing lanes on multi lane roads, and making right turns.

I would generally follow these same rules when piloting a cage.
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
Simon Galgut wrote:
> Is this a Good Thing ?

Yes if you need road users behind to hang back or give more room, but normally I don't feel the
need. I look behind, wait for a suitable moment, then accelerate past them. Only takes a jiffy if
you put some welly into
it.

.....Hold on, hold on!!!! :) I've just realised from the rest of your post that you're talking
about overtaking in a car. I dunno. Perhaps ask on a motoring newsgroup?

~PB
 
R

Russell Pinder

Guest
My advanced driving instructor (who also trains all the police class 1 drivers) was most particular
that signalling should NOT be used in this instance in any situation. (Contrary to what I'd been
taught when learning to drive). Same applied to parked cars.

The basic idea was to indicate my intentions by my position on the road taken early and to only
indicate when changing lanes on multilane roads or turning right and even then only when this was
necessary ie. there was someone to indicate to and the signal was unambiguous.

Russ

Simon Galgut <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Is this a Good Thing ?
>
> I have always signalled and given cyclists loads of space when passing (at least I have since I
> started cycling :) ). However I have recently had to modify this behaviour to take into account
> the moron in the vehicle behind and the particular stretch of road being travelled at the time.
> When on a road in the country with no significant turnings to the right signalling is not a
> problem, but in town when moving slowly and with turnoffs to the right it is inevitable that moron
> behind thinks that the slow-moving PiTA in the Land Rover in front (that'll be me then) is about
to
> turn right and get out of the way. The upshot of which is a near collision between said moron as
> they move to the left to squeeze past me, and the
bike
> I have just overtaken. I now only signal when not in town and would like to know if this is
correct
> / stupid / recommended or what other course of action is sensible.
>
> Regards Simon
 
D

Dave

Guest
"Simon Galgut" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Is this a Good Thing ?
>
> I have always signalled and given cyclists loads of space when passing (at least I have since I
> started cycling :) ). However I have recently had to modify this behaviour to take into account
> the moron in the vehicle behind and the particular stretch of road being travelled at the time.
> When on a road in the country with no significant turnings to the right signalling is not a
> problem, but in town when moving slowly and with turnoffs to the right it is inevitable that moron
> behind thinks that the slow-moving PiTA in the Land Rover in front (that'll be me then) is about
to
> turn right and get out of the way. The upshot of which is a near collision between said moron as
> they move to the left to squeeze past me, and the
bike
> I have just overtaken. I now only signal when not in town and would like to know if this is
correct
> / stupid / recommended or what other course of action is sensible.
>
> Regards Simon
>
>
I go for the 'couple of flashes' approach. This usually confuses them enough to cause them to stop
and ask 'What's this prat playing at?' and take a couple of secs to assess the situation, by which
time it's clearer that I'm overtaking a cyclist... Dave.
 
B

Bazza De Looney

Guest
Am I unusual..... one two separate occaisons I have been out riding, signaled to turn right and
motorists have slowed to let me move across to the centre of the road.

Thank you to those two considerate drivers, if only there were more.

My final thought is..... do I look so scary on a bike that drivers wont even get close enough
to worry me?

Perhaps we could insitgate a 'Driver of the Month' award for any driver showing consideration
for cyclists!
 
N

Nick Kew

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, one of infinite monkeys
at the keyboard of "Simon Galgut" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Is this a Good Thing ?
>
> I have always signalled and given cyclists loads of space when passing (at least I have since I
> started cycling :) ). However I have recently had to modify this behaviour to take into account
> the moron in the vehicle behind and the particular stretch of road being travelled at the time.

Precisely. Who is your signal supposed to benefit?

> The upshot of which is a near collision between said moron as they move to the left to squeeze
> past me, and the bike I have just overtaken.

That situation suggests a certain road width, which in turn suggests that you must've had sufficient
space to pass the cyclist without crossing the centre line. Best policy there is to move out well in
advance (claim the middle of the road), but then not signal. That way, moron won't try and pass on
the left, and will only overtake if there's genuinely enough room.

--
Wear your paunch with pride!
 
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