Simoni to Cunego

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Robert Chung, May 30, 2004.

  1. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    "*That*'s how you lead someone out for the win."
     
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  2. Robert Chung wrote:
    > "*That*'s how you lead someone out for the win."

    I had to think just a little bit before I got it, but then
    you had me rolling on the floor, really good one ;))) It was
    also really cool to see how Cunego didn't challenge Cioni
    for the last KOM points thus paying back Wegman for his
    efforts the other day.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  3. Trg

    Trg Guest

    Per Elmsäter wrote:
    > Robert Chung wrote:
    >> "*That*'s how you lead someone out for the win."
    >
    > I had to think just a little bit before I got it, but then
    > you had me rolling on the floor, really good one ;))) It
    > was also really cool to see how Cunego didn't challenge
    > Cioni for the last KOM points thus paying back Wegman for
    > his efforts the other day.

    That and the fact that Cioni pulled him up the mountain.
    Having someone pull for many K's and then steal the bonus
    from them in a sprint (when those seconds won't mean
    anything for you or your team but will for him) leaves a bad
    taste in the mouth. makes me think of Mayo, staying on
    Ullrich's wheel up Luz Ardiden last year and then taking the
    bonus when Ullrich was 15 seconds behind Armstrong while
    Mayo was somethink like 3 minutes behind Vino and 3 minutes
    ahead of Basso).
     
  4. Psycholist

    Psycholist Guest

  5. On Sun, 30 May 2004 08:16:00 +0200, Robert Chung wrote:
    >"*That*'s how you lead someone out for the win."

    I was away today, in the Ardennes around but not the
    cyclotouriste T-B-T, so I don't get it (at least I hope
    that's the reason). Whaddaya mean, Velo and Petacchi?
     
  6. Jeff Jones

    Jeff Jones Guest

    "Ewoud Dronkert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 30 May 2004 08:16:00 +0200, Robert Chung wrote:
    > >"*That*'s how you lead someone out for the win."
    >
    > I was away today, in the Ardennes around but not the
    > cyclotouriste T-B-T, so I don't get it (at least I hope
    > that's the reason). Whaddaya mean, Velo and Petacchi?

    Stage 19, where Gibo led out Garzelli (it could be argued
    for the last 85 km)
     
  7. On Mon, 31 May 2004 06:21:09 +1000, Jeff Jones wrote:
    >Stage 19, where Gibo led out Garzelli (it could be argued
    >for the last 85 km)

    Oh ok, yeah funny. Although it wasn't even as much of a
    leadout as it should have been. I think someone said it
    before (in rbr), but Simoni should of course have kept
    riding, in stead of pretending to play for the sprint.
    Unless he bought it, he would never ever stay ahead of
    Garzelli in a sprint, who is a decent hard race sprinter,
    while Simoni is one of the biggest strijkijzers around.
     
  8. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Ewoud Dronkert wrote:
    > On Mon, 31 May 2004 06:21:09 +1000, Jeff Jones wrote:
    >
    >>Stage 19, where Gibo led out Garzelli (it could be argued
    >>for the last 85 km)
    >
    >
    > Oh ok, yeah funny. Although it wasn't even as much of a
    > leadout as it should have been. I think someone said it
    > before (in rbr), but Simoni should of course have kept
    > riding, in stead of pretending to play for the sprint.
    > Unless he bought it, he would never ever stay ahead of
    > Garzelli in a sprint, who is a decent hard race sprinter,
    > while Simoni is one of the biggest strijkijzers around.

    Strijkijzer? When I Google this I get listings for steam
    irons. Does this have some other meaning?
     
  9. Sonarrat

    Sonarrat Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Dave <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Ewoud Dronkert wrote:
    > > On Mon, 31 May 2004 06:21:09 +1000, Jeff Jones wrote:
    > >
    > >>Stage 19, where Gibo led out Garzelli (it could be
    > >>argued for the last 85 km)
    > >
    > >
    > > Oh ok, yeah funny. Although it wasn't even as much of a
    > > leadout as it should have been. I think someone said it
    > > before (in rbr), but Simoni should of course have kept
    > > riding, in stead of pretending to play for the sprint.
    > > Unless he bought it, he would never ever stay ahead of
    > > Garzelli in a sprint, who is a decent hard race
    > > sprinter, while Simoni is one of the biggest
    > > strijkijzers around.
    >
    > Strijkijzer? When I Google this I get listings for steam
    > irons. Does this have some other meaning?

    It's a term that entered common RBR usage during the spring
    classics period this year when Rebellin beat Boogerd twice
    in the space of a week, but it first appeared on the
    newsgroup in 2000, below:

    ==

    "Theodore Heise" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Ewoud Dronkert writes:
    > > Boogerd. [...] he sprints like a strijkijzer.
    >
    > Okay, I gotta ask. What's a strijkijzer?

    Flat-iron. (it's doesn't accelerate very well). Also hear
    http://www.xs4all.nl/~ewoud/cycling/strijkijzers.mp3 (66
    kB), Mark Uytterhoeven on Flemish TV describing Tafi,
    Wauters and Serpellini in a breakaway in the 2000 Ronde van
    Vlaanderen as a 'shop of flat-irons'.

    ED

    Also:

    ==

    Nev Shea <[email protected]> schreef in berichtnieuws
    [email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, "benjamin maso"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I'm not so sure that Armstrong can beat Pantani in the
    > > sprint. Pantani is a better sprinter than people think,
    > > and Armstrong is probably the only racer in the world
    > > who ever lost a sprint to Michael Boogerd.
    >
    > Perhaps Lance would have had more in his sprint at the
    > Amstel (or Boogerd a bit less) if Boogerd had taken a pull
    > or 2 instead of sucking Lance's wheel to the end.

    Sure, but we're talking about Boogerd, the prototype of what
    in Dutch is called a `strijkijzer' (flat-iron), which means
    the type of rider which every average sprinter can beat,
    even after having towed him for 50 miles.

    Benjo Maso
     
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