Simple Green and Chains - Velonews article

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Llatikcuf, Nov 29, 2005.

  1. Llatikcuf

    Llatikcuf Guest

    Tags:


  2. JeffWills

    JeffWills Guest

    Llatikcuf wrote:
    > VeloNews did a tech article on it:
    >
    > http://www.velonews.com/tech/report/articles/9216.0.html
    >
    > -Nate


    Humph. One more reason to avoid cleaning my chain with Simple Green-
    it's water based. I can't see how it would be good to wash the chain
    off with water, then try to get all the water out with oil. Why not use
    an oil-based solvent to begin with? (I use kerosene, by the way.)

    Jeff
     
  3. Wannagofast

    Wannagofast Guest

    I've always wondered the same thing, I use Diesel or Mobil One cut with 4
    parts Paint Thinner.


    "JeffWills" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Llatikcuf wrote:
    >> VeloNews did a tech article on it:
    >>
    >> http://www.velonews.com/tech/report/articles/9216.0.html
    >>
    >> -Nate

    >
    > Humph. One more reason to avoid cleaning my chain with Simple Green-
    > it's water based. I can't see how it would be good to wash the chain
    > off with water, then try to get all the water out with oil. Why not use
    > an oil-based solvent to begin with? (I use kerosene, by the way.)
    >
    > Jeff
    >
     
  4. bit eimer

    bit eimer Guest

    "Wannagofast" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Knajf.26033$q%[email protected]
    > I've always wondered the same thing, I use Diesel or Mobil One cut with 4
    > parts Paint Thinner.
    >
    >
    > "JeffWills" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> Llatikcuf wrote:
    >>> VeloNews did a tech article on it:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.velonews.com/tech/report/articles/9216.0.html
    >>>
    >>> -Nate

    >>
    >> Humph. One more reason to avoid cleaning my chain with Simple Green-
    >> it's water based. I can't see how it would be good to wash the chain
    >> off with water, then try to get all the water out with oil. Why not use
    >> an oil-based solvent to begin with? (I use kerosene, by the way.)
    >>
    >> Jeff
    >>

    >
    >


    Hi,

    I'm new to the group; been lurking for a while - thought I'd toss in my
    2-cents on this one. I recently bought a small ultrasonic cleaner (for
    jewelry). Its intended for water, but I use mineral spirits in it to clean
    bicycle parts. It does an excellent job, especially on chains and
    freewheels.

    For lubrication, I soak the chain in liquid parafin - something I learned 25
    years ago. Maybe not the best method, but the chain is quiet and doesn't
    seem to collect much grime.


    --
    ....The Bit Eimer NAR 84054 L1
    "My goal in life is to be the kind of person my cat thinks he is"
    [remove keinewurst and reverse letters in domain to email me]
    --------------------------------------------------------------
     
  5. CEarly

    CEarly Guest

    "Wannagofast" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Knajf.26033$q%[email protected]
    > I've always wondered the same thing, I use Diesel or Mobil One cut with 4
    > parts Paint Thinner.


    That gives you a 50% chance of actually using a lubricant.

    Cal
     
  6. John

    John Guest

    Llatikcuf wrote:
    > VeloNews did a tech article on it:
    >
    > http://www.velonews.com/tech/report/articles/9216.0.html
    >
    > -Nate


    COULD IT BE THE CHAIN?

    A couple of months ago I bought a new Sram chain and soaked it paint
    thinner for about 10 minutes to take off the factory lube because I use
    White Lightning wax and you need to remove all lube before applying the
    wax. Anyway, after putting on the chain and taking my bike for a ride,
    the drive train sounded really bad. I discovered there were 3 missing
    rollers (all next to each other) so I replaced them with the extra
    chain links I still had and haven't had a problem since(about 400
    miles.
    I'm not sure if the rollers were missing from the beginning, broke off
    after installing the chain and riding, or if the paint thinner caused
    it. I know there have been other post about Sram chain rollers being
    pitted.

    John
     
  7. Llatikcuf

    Llatikcuf Guest

  8. maxo

    maxo Guest

    Anybody that leaves parts to soak in a water based degreaser overnight
    deserves whatever damage gets done.

    I use Simple green on the chain when it's warm enough outside to dry
    the chain completely before relubing.

    In the winter, it's a matter of using Power Lube (or similar), and then
    wiping the thing dry. About once every other moth is all that's needed.

    Get some fenders for winter folks, and keep at least a modicum of slop
    off your chains--you won't have to deal with them that oftern.
     
  9. C Wright

    C Wright Guest

    After reading several posts in this thread I got out a spray can of Simple
    Green that I have and actually read the directions!
    What it actually says regarding "soak" time is: "Let foam stand on surface
    for several minutes." "Leave on longer for heavier soiled surfaces."
    It then goes on to recommend scrubbing, rinsing with water and drying.
    From those directions I would conclude that 'longer' would mean more minutes
    of soak time, not hours, days, weeks or months!
    Perhaps the directions are different on different forms of Simple Green
    containers (I just have the spray can) but if those directions are at all
    consistent from one type of container to another I wonder where people would
    get the idea that soaking chains for days, weeks, and longer, was a good
    idea?
    Chuck
     
  10. maxo

    maxo Guest

    This reminds me of the "Don't drink Coke, it dissolves pennies!"
    nonsense. LOL
     
  11. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    Llatikcuf wrote:
    > VeloNews did a tech article on it:
    >
    > http://www.velonews.com/tech/report/articles/9216.0.html
    >
    > -Nate
    >


    I love the description of the new product by their "marketing specialist":

    "The new product, called Extreme Simple Green Aircraft & Precision
    Cleaner, has heightened non-corrosive qualities"

    Now that's some marketing-speak!
     
  12. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 29 Nov 2005 19:08:33 -0800, "Llatikcuf" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >VeloNews did a tech article on it:
    >
    >http://www.velonews.com/tech/report/articles/9216.0.html


    Just an observation; I don't know if it proves anything. I've been
    cleaning my chains in Simple Green for years and have noticed that
    when I first put the chain in the Simple Green there's lots of
    activity happening at the surface. There are no visible bubbles
    appearing, but the film of lubricant dances around on the surface of
    the Simple Green.

    I've often wondered what causes this. Anyone?


    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  13. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    On Tue, 29 Nov 2005 22:52:52 -0700, bit eimer wrote:

    > I'm new to the group; been lurking for a while - thought I'd toss in my
    > 2-cents on this one. I recently bought a small ultrasonic cleaner (for
    > jewelry). Its intended for water, but I use mineral spirits in it to clean
    > bicycle parts. It does an excellent job, especially on chains and
    > freewheels.


    These are amazing, perfect for bike chains. I don't understand why
    they're not common in bike shops. I wish I still had mine.

    Matt O.
     
  14. jim beam

    jim beam Guest

    Peter Cole wrote:
    > Llatikcuf wrote:
    >
    >> VeloNews did a tech article on it:
    >>
    >> http://www.velonews.com/tech/report/articles/9216.0.html
    >>
    >> -Nate
    >>

    >
    > I love the description of the new product by their "marketing specialist":
    >
    > "The new product, called Extreme Simple Green Aircraft & Precision
    > Cleaner, has heightened non-corrosive qualities"
    >
    > Now that's some marketing-speak!


    the quote i like is "...probably caused by hydrogen embrittlement of the
    steel chain. This is also known as stress cracking corrosion."

    more evidence that the "little knowledge is a dangerous thing" crowd are
    /way/ over-represented in cycling "tech" - stress corrosion & hydrogen
    embrittlement are two /very/ different things.

    [for the record, that probably /is/ stress corrosion. for thin section
    like this, the rate of hydrogen diffusion is so high, it's almost
    certainly not the issue.]
     
Loading...
Loading...