Simple syrup

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Photoman, Feb 19, 2004.

  1. Photoman

    Photoman Guest

    I boiled equal parts of water and sugar to the desired thickness, but after cooling there is a
    precipitate of solidified sugar. How do I avoid this condition? TIA Joe Arnold
     
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  2. Sandy N Ne

    Sandy N Ne Guest

    I grew up working at my moms Dairy Queen, and we made simple syrup in 5 gallon batches. The key is
    hot boiling water added to the sugar, then stir until your arm feels ready to fall off, until all
    the sugar is dissolved. . You add cold water to the sugar and try to bring it up to heat you get the
    crystalization problem. I know we would mix 1-20 lb bag of sugar to 5 gallons of water.

    Sandra
     
  3. Photoman

    Photoman Guest

    "Sandy n ne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I grew up working at my moms Dairy Queen, and we made simple syrup in 5
    gallon
    > batches. The key is hot boiling water added to the sugar, then stir until
    your
    > arm feels ready to fall off, until all the sugar is dissolved. . You add
    cold
    > water to the sugar and try to bring it up to heat you get the
    crystalization
    > problem. I know we would mix 1-20 lb bag of sugar to 5 gallons of water.
    >
    > Sandra

    Thank you Sandra! I'm making it (adding vanilla extract) to make milk shakes and vanilla cokes. Joe
     
  4. The Joneses

    The Joneses Guest

    PhotoMan wrote:

    > I boiled equal parts of water and sugar to the desired thickness, but after cooling there is a
    > precipitate of solidified sugar. How do I avoid this condition? TIA Joe Arnold

    From the foodtv & a recipe for candied ginger, the deal is to add a tablespoon or 4 (depending on
    the amount you make) of corn syrup to your simple syrup. Corn syrup is a different kind of sugar
    (fructose?) and will help prevent the sugar syrup (glucose?) from organizing into crystals. Not too
    terribly scientific on my part, but there you go anyway. Edrena
     
  5. Photoman

    Photoman Guest

    Thanks folks - really 'preciate the help! Joe

    "The Joneses" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > PhotoMan wrote:
    >
    > > I boiled equal parts of water and sugar to the desired thickness, but
    after
    > > cooling there is a precipitate of solidified sugar. How do I avoid this condition? TIA Joe
    > > Arnold
    >
    > From the foodtv & a recipe for candied ginger, the deal is to add a
    tablespoon
    > or 4 (depending on the amount you make) of corn syrup to your simple
    syrup.
    > Corn syrup is a different kind of sugar (fructose?) and will help prevent
    the
    > sugar syrup (glucose?) from organizing into crystals. Not too terribly scientific on my part, but
    > there you go anyway. Edrena
     
  6. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Sandy n ne wrote:
    > I grew up working at my moms Dairy Queen, and we made simple syrup in 5 gallon batches. The key is
    > hot boiling water added to the sugar, then stir until your arm feels ready to fall off, until all
    > the sugar is dissolved. . You add cold water to the sugar and try to bring it up to heat you get
    > the crystalization problem. I know we would mix 1-20 lb bag of sugar to 5 gallons of water.
    >
    > Sandra

    Agreed, Sandra. I worked at an ice cream parlor when I was 17 years old; we had to make simple syrup
    for the shakes and malts. HOT HOT HOT water and STIR STIR STIR was the key :)

    Jill
     
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