Simple test for overtraining



mogulhead

New Member
Jul 18, 2003
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Just came across this simple check list for overtraining. The website it came from was here.

It goes like this.

Simply rate each statement on a 1-5 scale as follows: 1 = strongly disagree; 2 = disagree; 3 = neutral; 4 = agree; 5 = strongly agree.
(1) I slept really well last night.
(2) I am looking forward to today's workout.
(3) I am optimistic about my future performance(s).
(4) I feel vigorous and energetic.
(5) My appetite is great.
(6) I have very little muscle soreness.

Evaluate yourself in this way each morning when you are ready to start your day. If your total score is 20 or above, your overall state of recovery is pretty good and you have probably recovered enough to carry out a high-quality workout on that day. If your total score is below 20, it is probably a good idea to rest or work easily until your score rises again.

Do you people think that this would be useful?

Cheers
 
J

John Tserkezis

Guest
mogulhead wrote:

> Do you people think that this would be useful?


An easier way is to measure your resting heart rate (soon after you wake up).

As you get fitter, it drops, and eventually levels off.

If you observe it going up again, even though you're training hard, it means
you're overtraining.

Of course, this technique means you need a significant amount of data (at
least a month or two) to determine a baseline before being able to get a
reliable diagnosis.



The problem with your suggestion is that it very much involves subjective
feelings and interpetations. I have not found this to be a reliable repeatable
measurable quantity.
It also leaves the daily 'score' somewhat open to drift and/or spikes due to
mood changes, if you're predisposed to that.
--
Linux Registered User # 302622 <http://counter.li.org>
 

mogulhead

New Member
Jul 18, 2003
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This article here suggests that heart rate monitoring is not that good at measuring overtraining and that a questionaire has the best results. An extract of the article is quoted below. I must say that this is something I want to believe as I am hesitant to buy a heart rate monitor due to the cost. Has the heart rate monitor been effective for you in assessing overtraining.

"Heart-rate monitoring comes to mind, but both exercising and resting heart rates tend to do a remarkably poor job of predicting performance and assessing recovery status. One problem is that heart rate is dependent on a wealth of different variables, including emotional state, diet, hydration status, temperature, humidity, sleep patterns, sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity. One or more of these variables could easily mask the drop in heart rate associated with optimal recovery - or might even disguise the ill effects of a totally inadequate recovery!
Bear in mind that measures of wellbeing have often done an excellent job of predicting performance and assessing recovery adequacy."

Cheers
 
O

Oscar

Guest
mogulhead wrote:
> Just came across this simple check list for overtraining. The website
> it came from was 'here' (http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/cycling.htm).
>
> It goes like this.
>
> Simply rate each statement on a 1-5 scale as follows: 1 = strongly
> disagree; 2 = disagree; 3 = neutral; 4 = agree; 5 = strongly agree.
> (1) I slept really well last night.
> (2) I am looking forward to today's workout.
> (3) I am optimistic about my future performance(s).
> (4) I feel vigorous and energetic.
> (5) My appetite is great.
> (6) I have very little muscle soreness.
>
> Evaluate yourself in this way each morning when you are ready to start
> your day. If your total score is 20 or above, your overall state of
> recovery is pretty good and you have probably recovered enough to carry
> out a high-quality workout on that day. If your total score is below 20,
> it is probably a good idea to rest or work easily until your score rises
> again.
>
> Do you people think that this would be useful?
>
> Cheers
>
>


I remember one from a triathlete that says if you meet three bastards in
one day it means you're overtraining. It works!
 

warrwych

New Member
Jun 7, 2004
1,009
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0
John Tserkezis said:
mogulhead wrote:

> Do you people think that this would be useful?


An easier way is to measure your resting heart rate (soon after you wake up).

As you get fitter, it drops, and eventually levels off.

If you observe it going up again, even though you're training hard, it means
you're overtraining.

Of course, this technique means you need a significant amount of data (at
least a month or two) to determine a baseline before being able to get a
reliable diagnosis.



The problem with your suggestion is that it very much involves subjective
feelings and interpetations. I have not found this to be a reliable repeatable
measurable quantity.
It also leaves the daily 'score' somewhat open to drift and/or spikes due to
mood changes, if you're predisposed to that.
--
Linux Registered User # 302622 <http://counter.li.org>


simple solution - use both methods.. as to the 3 bastards in a day method, i must be permanently overtrained!!!!!!!!!!!!! :p
 

MikeyOz

New Member
Aug 12, 2003
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warrwych said:
simple solution - use both methods.. as to the 3 bastards in a day method, i must be permanently overtrained!!!!!!!!!!!!! :p
from personal experience, heart rate is too unreliable to tell if over trained, I almost know from how I am feeling myself if I am over trained or not, I dont think heart rate would work to measure overtraining, if anything your heart rate would be more effected by the "outside" influences....

I usually meet 3 bastards every day.... cool....