Single Guy Cookbook?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by biig, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. biig

    biig Guest

    Even better...the Hamilton-Beach grill with the removable grates. It
    has a larger capacity drip tray and is easier to clean. My George
    Forman grill began to lose it's nonstitck coating fairly quickly and the
    drip tray is separate. The H-B model is a little "drawer" that fits
    into the side. I've had mine for two years and love it. I use it 2-3
    times a week. Sharon in Canada

    David Rhodes wrote:
    >
    > Get yourself a George Foreman grill. The family size one comes with a good
    > cookbok for making quick tasty meals. It costs about $60.00.
    > "Kyonn Gowans" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hello all
    > >
    > > I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something that
    > > emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap to
    > > make, any suggestions?
    > >
     
    Tags:


  2. Kyonn Gowans

    Kyonn Gowans Guest

    Hello all

    I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something that
    emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap to make,
    any suggestions?
     
  3. Books I have seen in new and used bookstores:

    Bachelors Aid Cookbook, Owens
    The Campus Survival Cookbook, Wood & Gilchrist
    College Student's Cookbook, Lambert
    Cookbook for One, O'Neill
    Cookery for One or Two, Swain
    Eating In, Official Single Man's Cookbook, Lippman & Malonado
    Meals for Two, Culinary Arts Institute
    Rice Bowl Recipes, Asada
    Single Servings, Bell
    Starving Students Cookbook, Hall

    Those should give you a start. Especially the College Student type books.
    Another source of ideas would be Camping Cookbooks. There are quite a few
    aimed at the single camper. A few that come to mind are:

    Cooking the One Burner Way, Gray/Tilton
    The One Burner Gourmet, Barker
    The One Pan Gourmet, Jacobson
    Simple Foods for the Pack, Sierra Club

    Even more esoteric are cookbooks aimed at the single touring bicyclist,
    don't have the names for those.

    Hope this is of some help....I probably just scratched the service. But a
    good perusing of book stores (especially the used ones) will get you
    started....Eric
     
  4. David Rhodes

    David Rhodes Guest

    Get yourself a George Foreman grill. The family size one comes with a good
    cookbok for making quick tasty meals. It costs about $60.00.
    "Kyonn Gowans" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello all
    >
    > I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something that
    > emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap to
    > make, any suggestions?
    >
     
  5. Ashlyn

    Ashlyn Guest

    There is a book called "A Man, a Can, and a Plan". It is all very easy
    recipes starting with some canned food item, and geared to the "domestically
    challenged". Definitely a single guy cookbook!



    "Kyonn Gowans" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello all
    >
    > I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something that
    > emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap to
    > make, any suggestions?
    >
     
  6. Skipper

    Skipper Guest

    On Mon, 31 Jan 2005 15:59:06 -0900, "Kyonn Gowans" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Hello all
    >
    > I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something that
    >emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap to make,
    >any suggestions?
    >


    Get regular cookbooks for foods you want to learn. Read the book
    and cut down to your size. The best foods come from your own oven. It
    can be fast and still be good.
    When you look at cookbooks, avoid the books that call for "a can
    of" or "a package of" as part of the recipe. Anyone can pour a can of
    soup over a roast. It creates a mediocre meal, at best.
    A little experience with herbs, spices, and flavor combinations,
    and you won't need a book. Remember that the (now) common spice, black
    pepper, was called the king of spices for a good reason.

    For cheap, use potatoes, rice, chicken, and fresh vegetables.
    Always use fresh or dried. Avoid cans of anything. Save the water from
    steaming vegetables for soup or stock. Try using a crockpot.
     
  7. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    I have both the George Foreman and the Hamilton-Beach grills, and I agree --
    the HB grill is much better. I prefer having removable grills that I can
    soak in the sink. In addition, the GF drip tray sits below the grill but is
    not attached. It would be very easy to bumb or knock it when working in the
    area. The drip tray for the HB grill slides into the side of the grill like
    a little drawer -- a much better and safer arrangement.

    MaryL

    "biig" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > Even better...the Hamilton-Beach grill with the removable grates. It
    > has a larger capacity drip tray and is easier to clean. My George
    > Forman grill began to lose it's nonstitck coating fairly quickly and the
    > drip tray is separate. The H-B model is a little "drawer" that fits
    > into the side. I've had mine for two years and love it. I use it 2-3
    > times a week. Sharon in Canada
    >
    > David Rhodes wrote:
    >>
    >> Get yourself a George Foreman grill. The family size one comes with a
    >> good
    >> cookbok for making quick tasty meals. It costs about $60.00.
    >> "Kyonn Gowans" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > Hello all
    >> >
    >> > I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something that
    >> > emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap to
    >> > make, any suggestions?
    >> >
     
  8. jem

    jem Guest

    Kyonn Gowans wrote:
    > Hello all
    >
    > I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something that
    > emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap to make,
    > any suggestions?
    >
    >

    Try the frozen foods section at the grocery store. Deli counter, too.
     
  9. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "jem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Kyonn Gowans wrote:
    >> Hello all
    >>
    >> I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something that
    >> emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap to
    >> make, any suggestions?

    > Try the frozen foods section at the grocery store. Deli counter, too.


    Funny - I've never seen any cookbooks at the frozen foods section.

    Gee, thanks for the helpful reply.



    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  10. Vox Humana

    Vox Humana Guest

    "jem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Kyonn Gowans wrote:
    > > Hello all
    > >
    > > I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something that
    > > emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap to

    make,
    > > any suggestions?
    > >
    > >

    > Try the frozen foods section at the grocery store. Deli counter, too.


    I would recommend "Everyday Food" by Martha Stewart. It is a small format
    publication sold either on the magazine rack or with the tabloids in the
    supermarket. It has simple recipes for good food made with a minimum of
    easy-to-find ingredients. There are menus and shopping lists along with
    tips and techniques. You can see a sample here:
    http://www.marthastewart.com/page.jhtml?type=page-cat&id=cat16260
     
  11. jem

    jem Guest

    Peter Aitken wrote:
    > "jem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Kyonn Gowans wrote:
    >>
    >>>Hello all
    >>>
    >>> I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something that
    >>>emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap to
    >>>make, any suggestions?

    >>
    >>Try the frozen foods section at the grocery store. Deli counter, too.

    >
    >
    > Funny - I've never seen any cookbooks at the frozen foods section.
    >
    > Gee, thanks for the helpful reply.


    Sorry, it actually was a feeble attempt at humor. As a single guy for
    most of my adult life I can appreciate the difficulty of cooking for
    one. My solution was always "embrace leftovers".
     
  12. jem wrote:

    > Peter Aitken wrote:
    > > "jem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >>Kyonn Gowans wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>Hello all
    > >>>
    > >>> I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something that
    > >>>emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap to
    > >>>make, any suggestions?
    > >>
    > >>Try the frozen foods section at the grocery store. Deli counter, too.

    > >
    > >
    > > Funny - I've never seen any cookbooks at the frozen foods section.
    > >
    > > Gee, thanks for the helpful reply.

    >
    > Sorry, it actually was a feeble attempt at humor. As a single guy for
    > most of my adult life I can appreciate the difficulty of cooking for
    > one. My solution was always "embrace leftovers".



    You need an ole lady...train her to cook yer vittles...fetch yer bunny
    slippers...and run to you all sexually insatiable when you've got a woodrow
    on and you whistle "Here, girl...".

    Be sure to put her on a *very* short leash...and beat the living crap out of
    her when she gets "out of line"...

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  13. Mrs Bonk

    Mrs Bonk Guest

    "Gregory Morrow"
    <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    >
    > jem wrote:
    >
    > > Peter Aitken wrote:
    > > > "jem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > >
    > > >>Kyonn Gowans wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >>>Hello all
    > > >>>
    > > >>> I'm looking a cookbook geared towards a single guy, something

    that
    > > >>>emphasizes single serving that are fast, cheat and relatively cheap

    to
    > > >>>make, any suggestions?
    > > >>
    > > >>Try the frozen foods section at the grocery store. Deli counter, too.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Funny - I've never seen any cookbooks at the frozen foods section.
    > > >
    > > > Gee, thanks for the helpful reply.

    > >
    > > Sorry, it actually was a feeble attempt at humor. As a single guy for
    > > most of my adult life I can appreciate the difficulty of cooking for
    > > one. My solution was always "embrace leftovers".

    >
    >
    > You need an ole lady...train her to cook yer vittles...fetch yer bunny
    > slippers...and run to you all sexually insatiable when you've got a

    woodrow
    > on and you whistle "Here, girl...".
    >
    > Be sure to put her on a *very* short leash...and beat the living crap out

    of
    > her when she gets "out of line"...


    I have a recipe for woolly mammoth stew if you're interested!
     
  14. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    jem wrote:

    > Sorry, it actually was a feeble attempt at humor. As a single guy for
    > most of my adult life I can appreciate the difficulty of cooking for
    > one. My solution was always "embrace leftovers".


    Leftovers? Yech.

    Ok, there are some leftover things things that are good. I like roasted
    chicken and beef cold or reheated, especially in gravy. I have made up some
    sort of curries for left over lamb. I have no use for leftover pork. Some
    things are even better as leftovers than the first time round, like good
    stews. My old coworker was a bachelor and he cooked more roasts than my wife
    and I do. He roast for himself every sunday night, and then he has leftovers
    more most of the rest of the week. When I am baching it for a few days I tend
    to do stir fries.
     
  15. On Sun, 06 Feb 2005 17:35:53 -0500, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >jem wrote:
    >
    >> Sorry, it actually was a feeble attempt at humor. As a single guy for
    >> most of my adult life I can appreciate the difficulty of cooking for
    >> one. My solution was always "embrace leftovers".

    >
    >Leftovers? Yech.


    Not necessarily. I'm a single woman, and I batch cook on weekends.
    Soups and stews designed to be freezable all go into the freezer for
    consumption at later dates. Stir-frys hold quite nicely for
    consumption during the week over noodles or rice. Risottos make
    fantastic lunches along with a green salad, as do fritattas, lasange,
    and any pasta sauce over pasta.

    That would be embracing leftovers deliberately, yeah, and I always
    have something ready for friends who drop by.

    >Ok, there are some leftover things things that are good. I like roasted
    >chicken and beef cold or reheated, especially in gravy. I have made up some
    >sort of curries for left over lamb. I have no use for leftover pork. Some
    >things are even better as leftovers than the first time round, like good
    >stews. My old coworker was a bachelor and he cooked more roasts than my wife
    >and I do. He roast for himself every sunday night, and then he has leftovers
    >more most of the rest of the week.


    Sound cooking policy. Do that myself with a chicken. Cook once, hot
    dinner one night, lovely chicken and tomato sandwiches the rest of the
    week.

    So, in answer to the original poster's question, no, I can't think of
    a cookbook specifically designed for a single guy with minimal cooking
    experience. _However_ a good basic cookbook that explains why you want
    to do things a certain way, food handling guidelines and some flavour
    combinations will do you wonders. What food types are you interested
    in? If you are eating a vegetarian diet, you're going to need more
    nutritional information that one with meat. Eat lots of veggies,
    that's a given, and you'll want something with good recipes for that.
    I'm partial to Deborah Madison's "Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone" in
    that department. Her recipes are nutritionally balanced, use fats in
    an appropriate manner (not too little, and not too much) and have
    variation suggestions. I'm currently drooling after "Cookwise", as my
    former room-mate's copy was a goldmine about why some recipes work and
    why others don't. The Fanny Farmer Cookbook or Joy of Cooking should
    be in everyone's kitchen, as they both explainbasic principles, have
    "know you ingredients" sections and have lots of basic recipes that
    allow you to deal with anything from beans to deer to kolhrabi. Add
    in another recipe book with an emphasis on quick and easy
    combinations, preferably one with an emphasis on heartsmart cooking
    and you should be set up nicely.

    It's a lot of work to cook for one person in ratio to the results.
    That's why batch cooking is so useful.
     
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